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UAE Law: Everything You Need To Know About The #StayHome Guidelines

Photo: David Rodrigo/Unsplash We’ve said it once and we will say it again: “Please stay at home!” With UAE residents ignoring the advice to keep safe and stay indoors – in order to help prevent the spread of – the authorities have decided to take action. Dubai Police has stated that non-compliance with safety measures surrounding the campaign will lead to imprisonment and/or a fine between AED200,000 to AED1 million. The announcement was part of a tweet by Dubai Police which said, “@DubaiPoliceHQ has arrested a European national of Arab origin for posting a video showing her indifference to the #StayHome national campaign and encouraging people to defy authorities’ social distancing instructions. Legal measures were taken against her.” Earlier, the Dubai Police also arrested a beachgoer for posting a video which showed that he had been visiting a local beach, violating the instructions issued by the police and relevant authorities via social media. . — Dubai Media Office (@DXBMediaOffice) Dubai Police has repeatedly called on the public to follow the instructions, laws, and guidelines issued by official authorities amid the Covid-19 pandemic. “The law will strictly deal with anyone risking the security, safety, and comfort of members of our society,” it stated. Currently, everyone residing in the UAE has been urged to stay home this weekend while the country carries out its sanitization drive from 8pm on Thursday, March 26 to 6am on Sunday, March 29. The program will see the sterilization of all public places and transportation, government departments, as well as the streets. So, please stay home. Only leave if absolutely necessary, for example, to get medicine. Should you need to go out, for a valid reason, carry your ID. Other than for an emergency, don’t put yourself at risk by going for a walk or a jog. Stay indoors. If you are caught out and about you will be fined or jailed. Public transport will also be restricted during these days. Asking for cooperation from all citizens and residents, Brigadier Abdul Aziz Abdullah Ahmed from the Ministry of Interior said, “We will restrict the movement of traffic including public transport, and private vehicles during these days. Everyone should stay at home during this period from Thursday evening until Sunday morning except for employees in active sectors.” If you’re worried you will get bored staying in,. #News | Drones reinforce Coronavirus Precautionary Measures Details:https://t.co/L1OsY6tdKH#YourSecurityOurHappiness — Dubai Policeشرطة دبي (@DubaiPoliceHQ) When it comes to being a citizen or resident of the United Arab Emirates, there is a lot to be thankful for. This includes the. Remember, our protection from the virus is a joint effort between the people of the UAE as well as the government, and as, social distancing “is a critical demand from every one of us, in order for our city and our society to remain safe.” While the government is doing everything in its power to ensure our protection, it is up to us to make sure we follow the directives issued by authorities to safeguard public health. So, please #stayhome. Read Next: The post.

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Inside Mona Kattan’s Colorful and Artsy Villa on The Palm Jumeirah in Dubai

Perched on one of The Palm Jumeirah’s fronds, beauty entrepreneur Mona Kattan’s Dubai villa is colorful, artsy and happy  A hotel trolley is used for storing Mona Kattan’s many clothing deliveries, like this Jenny Packham dress. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Bright, beautiful, and peppered with dramatic design, when it comes to spectacular spaces, Dubai offers plenty of wow factor. As far as locations go, it doesn’t get more five-star than The Palm. It is home to. The 34-year-old’s villa, which she purchased with her sister Huda, founder of the billion-dollar empire, features cinematic views of its location and the Atlantis resort, which reminds Kattan of Aladdin. “It makes me feel like I’m in a fairy tale,” she says. Here, expect the paradise vibe to rival the plushest beach club. Lazy days are for barbecues and loafing by the private pool, which leads straight onto the beach. “As soon as you drive onto The Palm, you feel like you’re going on vacation,” she says. “I’m a big believer in feng shui and I think that being surrounded by water is so good for any living species. It takes away negative energy.” The poolside seating spot features an oil painting by Kattan’s favorite artist, Luca Valentini. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 The custom acrylic piano has led lights and plays music on its own. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 The villa has a big personality and its proportions are vast. At just under 1 500sqm, the grand scale of the property – epitomized by the seamless, open plan spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows – presents an opportunity to create a happy, art-filled interior. It is designed in the manner of any rock star Philippe Starck-planned home – incidentally Kattan’s favorite starchitect. Yet this cool, Travertine-floored interior has something else going on. On the one hand, the feel is floaty and serene; very much on point with the waterside location. On the other, it’s like a 90s bachelor pad with items such as a jukebox and Teckell T1 pink pool table. “I’ve always loved quirky furniture and art,” Kattan shares. “I like when things make you think, laugh, or smile. The house is calming because of all the water and white but I love the energy coming from the paintings and the fun aspects inside.” The open plan living areas feature gold bookcases and plush upholstery from Marina Home Interiors. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 After calling off her engagement to the timber trader Dominic Nowell-Barnes at the end of last year, this house is a true expression of Kattan’s personal taste. Her style pervades every corner of the space and she has created a home that she is happy living in on her own. Sheer white curtains form a halo and gold bookcases serve up dazzling lines, while a palette of ivory and gilding sets the chic island vibe. “Gold makes me happy,” says Kattan of the color scheme. “It is popular with Arabic interior design, so I feel like it’s my roots coming through.” Pushing the envelope with lashings of color, in the sitting room, huge pop art canvases are typical of Kattan’s appetite for fun. Each room is big on playful touches, which add energy and character. Disney princesses are a recurring motif and she has an anecdote for every piece. On the mezzanine, the paintings are by Italian artist Luca Valentini. Kattan says of the jasmine and unicorn piece, which she commissioned for the space, “I wanted to remind myself to have balance in life and to remember to dedicate equal time to love, romance, and happiness as much as I do to work. I’ve always been a workaholic but I’m trying to find more balance now.” An oversized crystal mirror takes pride of place in the open-plan living room. Elephants are a favorite for Kattan for their peaceful nature, like these ornaments on the marble console, all from Marina Home Interiors. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 “Everything has a lot of meaning for me,” she explains, not only of the artwork she has commissioned but also in the creation of perfumes for her fragrance line, part of Huda Beauty. Launching later this month, the new Kayali Déjà Vu features jasmine, a flower Kattan’s father would always pick for her when she was younger “I would keep them until they dried,” she recalls. Two-and-a-half years in the making, the new fragrance is romantic and floral and is intended to be layered alongside the existing four-bottle collection of musk, rose, citrus, and vanilla-based scents. Within the home, fragrance feature everywhere: in the office, bathroom, and dressing room but the majority of Kattan’s 2 000-strong perfume collection resides closeby at the Huda Beauty and Kayali headquarters in Jumeirah Lakes Towers. This way her fragrances are accessible at all times and can be used according to her mood. The Luca Valentini paintings above the hot pink pool table remind Kattan “To have balance in life”. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 The third floor of Kattan’s house is her haven and features her master bedroom, bathroom, and walk-in closet. A trove of accessories including sunglasses, shoes, and bags line the walls and the center showcases her wardrobe, featuring favorite designers Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Yousef Aljasmi, Jonathan Simkhai, Alex Perry, Gianvito Rossi, and René Caovilla, as well as high street brands like Fashion Nova. Her bathroom is flooded with products, from scented candles to luxury skincare. Lab samples from the recent launch of her sister’s new skincare brand, Wishful, currently dominate the scene. Laughing as she explains that she lives only five doors down from Huda, she says, “You’d think that maybe we would want a break from each other after a full day at work. The only surprising thing about living here is that I didn’t realize just how amazing it would be.” The white-and-gold color scheme and sheer curtains were inspired by the Sanderson hotel in London. Photographed by Ankita Chandra for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia Read Next: The post.

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The Duke & Duchess of Cambridge Announce a Mental Health Scheme to Tackle Covid-19 Anxiety

In the midst of a global pandemic, it’s easy for mental health concerns to be forgotten – even as self-isolation pushes us to our limits. Enter the lockdown via Instagram on March 29. The issue is, of course, one that’s close to their hearts, with the pair having launched the Heads Together campaign through The Royal Foundation in 2016 in order to combat the stigma around mental health issues. “Self-isolation and social distancing can pose huge challenges to our mental health – in recent weeks The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been in regular contact with organizations and patronages to understand the issues they are facing during this difficult time,” Kensington Palace explained. “Last week, the Duke spoke to.” The Cambridges then shared news of Public Health England’s newly announced guidelines for protecting your mental health while under lockdown – from maintaining regular sleep patterns to keeping your mind active with the likes of sudoku – while also praising the government’s decision to allocate £5 million for distribution to mental health charities through Mind. “It is great to see the mental health sector working together with the NHS to help people keep on top of their mental well-being,” the Duke and Duchess wrote. “By pulling together and taking simple steps each day, we can all be better prepared for the times ahead.” The message was accompanied by photographs of William and Kate in their respective offices, with the Duchess wearing the blush Marks & Spencer suit she chose for a recent outing in Croydon. Originally published on Read Next: The post.

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The Must-Have Pieces From This Ramadan’s Exclusive Capsule Collections

Net-a-Porter Modest Edit. Photo courtesy of Net-a-Porter Rami Al Ali. Photo courtesy of Rami Al Ali Net-a-Porter Modest Edit. Photo courtesy of Net-a-Porter Loro Piana SS20 Capsule Collection. Photo courtesy of Loro Piana Ingie Paris. Photo courtesy of Ingie Paris AMAL AL RAISI. Photo courtesy Amal Al Raisi Bambah. Photo courtesy of Bambah Serrb. Photo courtesy of Serrb Twisted Roots. Photo courtesy of Twisted Roots Shatha Essa. Photo courtesy of Shatha Essa Noor Al Bahrani. Photo courtesy of Noor Al Bahrani Iam Mai. Photo courtesy of Iam Mai Kage. Photo courtesy of Kage Mango. Photo courtesy of Mango Endemage. Photo courtesy of Endemage Marina Qureshi. Photo courtesy of Marina Qureshi Cos. Photo courtesy of Cos Chador. Photo courtesy of Chador Effa Ramadan 2020 collection. Photo courtesy of Effa 1 In anticipation of the Holy Month of touting exclusive pieces and culturally-inspired designs perfect for any iftar celebration. Syrian designer of the starseffortlessly blends the modest traditions of the East with the feminine playfulness of the West through pastel-colored kaftans decorated with delicate beaded embellishments that evoke memories of the effortless glamour of the Sixties. Drawing inspiration from its regional heritage, respectively. While the brand’s Parisian elegance continues to shine through with pleated hems, draped necklines, and fitted high waists, the variety of light fabrics and relaxed silhouettes on the limited-edition maxi dresses are decidedly local, championing the timeless sophistication of the modern Middle Eastern woman. Also Read: Also unveiling a collection exclusively for its Dubai Mall store, mosaics for a wardrobe easily transitional from day to evening. Meanwhile online, luxury e-retailer Click through the gallery above for more must-have pieces from this year’s highly-anticipated. Read Next: The post.

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Meet the Saudi Royals Leading Fashion Communities from the Ground Up

These Saudi royals consider true wealth to be opportunity for all. Discover the fashion communities they are leading from the ground up HRH Princess Nourah Al Faisal
Designer at Nuun Jewels and founder of Adhlal HRH Princess Nourah Al Faisal photographed by Abdullah Al Musharraf Ever since the. Al Faisal is taking the knowledge she has accrued selling her one-of-a-kind jewelry in Paris and pay it forward back in her native country. Her initial goal was to bring her company’s production back to Saudi. “It just made more sense to me to bring it back home and so I started to explore how I would do that and what it would look like,” says Al Faisal. Courtesy of Nuun Jewels She soon realized that what started like a simple enough endeavor was much more complex. More importantly, that she wasn’t the only one trying to navigate the ever-changing government rules and regulations of a country currently in the middle of systemic changes. There was no website or information hub that could provide Al Faisal with answers in regards to everything from import and export rates and copyright laws to rules regarding hiring international staff to train local hires. “As I was looking around, trying to figure it out, I was bumping into other designers who were living outside Saudi who also wanted to bring their manufacturing back to the Kingdom and move back home to be part of this amazing experience and transformation we are going through right now. But they were just as confused and in the dark as I was,” explains Al Faisal with a laugh. “There is no place more exciting right now to be, as a designer, than in Saudi” Her goal has always been to empower Saudis. She decided to create Adhlal, a social enterprise designed to “serve and champion the local design industry in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” The design scope for the organization is all-encompassing, from interior and jewelry design to architecture and graphic design. The first big initiative to come out of Adhlal is an inaugural report that will be published next year. It is dedicated to the design sector of Saudi Arabia, which was crafted from research culled from buyers, designers, and design students in the region. HRH Princess Nourah Al Faisal photographed by Francesco Scotti “A wonderful byproduct of building this report is that we have created a community of designers who are banding together to help one another,” says Al Faisal. “Saudi has a young dynamic sector who are extremely creative. We want the community to work collectively to solve their own problems, share their knowledge, and take advantage of the changes that are going on. In my opinion, there is no place more exciting right now to be, as a designer, than in Saudi.” HRH Princess Deemah Bint Mansour Bin Saud Alsaud
Founder of Personage concept store in Riyadh HRH Princess Deemah Bint Mansour Bin Saud Alsaud photographed by Abdullah Al Musharraf For any metropolis to even begin to consider itself a fashion hub, it has to have at least one cutting-edge concept store. A place where local fashion and up-and-coming designers commingle with international brands. A place to hang out with friends. And a place where pop-up shops, art exhibitions, and musical performances are always the order of the day. In other words, a place that is much more than just a store. It is an artisan community center. “I wanted to create a place where art, culture, and fashion would be able to come together” HRH Princess Deemah Bint Mansour Bin Saud Alsaud is a longtime fan of traveling and shopping the globe for unique regional creations. During her travels, she realized that, compared to what she was seeing abroad, her luxe local shopping experiences in Saudi were somewhat restricted. She decided to fix that problem herself. So two years ago she opened Saudi Arabia’s first true fashion concept store, which she named. “Our country has this tremendous pool of talents and creative individuals who have not had the chance, or a space, to showcase their uniqueness to the wider community,” explains Alsaud. “I wanted to create a place where art, culture, and fashion would be able to come together. The name of the store, Personage, came from this idea of presenting the value of each of us as individuals in an inclusive environment.” Photographed by Abdullah Al Musharraf Located in the heart of the city, Personage has quickly become a center of cool in the Kingdom. The three-floor store dedicates each level to different aspects of creative encouragement. On the ground floor, clothing, footwear, perfume, and jewelry brands share an open-plan space, where international labels like Les Benjamins, Qasimi, and Homiés Marbella mix with local favorites such as 1886, Ish, and Galag. Upstairs on the second floor is a café, while the top floor is dedicated to a rotation of artistic displays of creativity, be that music, painting, photography, or fashion. “One of my greatest joys is watching how our customers have made Personage into something much more than a store. It is a community now,” says Alsaud. “For me, style is how we express our identity. However, the pieces we choose and how we buy is something that gives us deeper insight into our values and what we care about. I believe in brands and new designers that express care, creativity, passion, and vision in what they create. Those designers are typically what you may find in Personage, and also in my wardrobe.” Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia Read Next: Egyptian Jewelry Designer Jude Benhalim on Getting Creative During Covid-19 Isolation The post.

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Welcome to The New Virtual Era: Keep Up with the World with These Online Masterclasses

  Photo: Christin Hume/Unsplash As part of a three-part series, we have compiled a comprehensive guide on how to keep yourself stimulated and connected in the virtual world. The second part of the series explores some of the most fascinating masterclasses to partake in, all without leaving your screen. Welcome to a new virtual world, and of finding new ways of learning and existing. IVY LEAGUE UNIVERSITY COURSES The offers more than 450 courses online, ranging from art & design and business to health and programming, you can receive specialized teaching on any subject of interest. SKILLSHARE Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes, on topics including illustration, photography, and even freelancing. Learning from specialized teachers with immense experience, one can start with no previous experience, and share skills throughout the platform. AT HOME FACIALS If you are missing your monthly facials, you can now learn directly from the masters. Find many of the most trusted beauticians and facialists offering and recipes for masks, perfect for a self-care day. iMUSIC CLASSES To help those wanting to learn a new instrument or continue their practice, offers videos and classes for instruments such as violin or piano, conducting, and even music theory. TATE MODERN With superb has never been more interesting. MASTERCLASS COURSES This subscription-based. EXPERIMENTS WITH GOOGLE In this interactive experience, you can Try out experiments blending the arts and technology. These experiments are created by artists and creative coders with, and range from virtual reality to machine-generated patterning, and automated photography. Read Next: The post.

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12 Local Beauty Brands to Support Now

It’s no secret that local and small businesses are feeling the burn of the current, with many of them supported by a team of females. From skincare formulas inspired by their culture to tools that can help you de-stress, it’s time to support local. Izil Beauty Natural skincare inspired by the ancient secrets of Moroccan Beauty founded by Mouna Abbassy. Available online for delivery across the GCC. The Fit Face The first #FaceWorkOut in the region. Learn how to sculpt, tone and lift your skin naturally from facial yoga expert and facial massage specialist Isadora Peric and her range of specially developed tools. The Simplicity Line Natural organic skincare products in Dubai for women made from essential oils and body butter, focusing on pregnancy, stretch mark prevention and more. Founded by Karissa Stelma. Pinky Goat The award-winning lash line developed by Dubai based Maha Morley-Kirk and Elle Hardy. KJ Serums The UAE’s only fresh made to order skin and hair care products with temperature-controlled delivery straight to your door every month. Founded by Kathryn Jones. ByNoussou A Dubai based vegan and cruelty-free skincare range created by Sarah Al Musili. Nina Uhbi Cosmetics A premium cruelty-free lash line from Dubai based make-up artist Nina Uhbi. The Dubai Dolls A luxury cruelty-free beauty brand developed in Dubai. As a social enterprise, The Dubai Dolls supports and improves young girls’ access to quality private childcare education in developing countries. They dedicate 2% of sales directly to ensure that one young girl from an underprivileged and undernourished background receives one year of nutritious lunch meals as well as education in a private institution. Shirley Conlon Organics High-performance, luxury organic skincare based in Dubai that offers high-performance products with proven results. KeraHealth Developed by Fay Afghahi these hair vitamins have been proven to reduce hair loss and stimulate your hair growth while improving hair strength and shine. Shiffa Created by Dr. Lamees out of personal necessity her highly effective formulas have reached cult status. Prismologie Created by Intisar and Fatima Al-Sabah, Prisomolgie focuses on the power of color therapy and injecting it into peoples daily lives. Read Next: The post.

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Prada’s SS20 Collection Embraces the Paradoxical Creativity of the Modern Woman

Photographed by Kat Irlin for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Step into the light of non-conformity with Prada back in September amid the boldly-colored geometric hall of the Fondazione Prada’s Deposito, Prada’s SS20 collection strips the essence of fashion back to its purest form. Photographed by Kat Irlin for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Championing a blend of signature silhouettes and shapes reminiscent of the sartorial world’s most infamous eras, from the 20s to the 70s and 90s, each piece is representative of a new interpretation of style that transcends time and the restrictive nature of adhering to the latest trends. Trusting in the power of women, especially one as visionary as, the latest season from the Italian heritage house is a revolving portrait of each woman who dons one of the SS20 designs. The meaning behind and perception of every garment transforms to reflect the originality and personality of the individual wearer’s instinctual taste while still embodying the universal classicism of Prada. Also Read: Photographed by Kat Irlin for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Simple fabrics juxtaposed with intricate embroidery create a sense of innocent wonder, from mohair pleated skirts and vibrant wool coats to fine-ribbed cashmere silk knitwear and toile fiammata dresses with velvet detailing. Statement accessories continue the paradoxical narrative with suede slippers and spazzolato loafers paired with woven leather bucket bags and wide-brimmed visors. Although the collection’s luxurious brocade and gold embellishments mimicking the colored ceramic tiles and gold-leaf decorated columns of the stage were brought to life on the runway, its indescribable glow continues to permeate into a sunlit reality. Photographed by Kat Irlin for Vogue Arabia March 2020 No matter how, where, or when this series of one-off pieces or entire ensembles are worn, the fundamental sophistication of Prada is not forgotten in a collection that promises a mix of textures, patterns, and hues that hint at the fresh fits an Italian springtime is known to bring. Photographed by Kat Irlin for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia Photography by Kat Irlin
Style by Sarah Gore Reeves
Hair by Nastya Milaeva
Makeup by Robert Greene at Honey Artists
Creative Direction Camilla Fitz-Patrick
Photography Assistant Ros Hayes
Model Alexandra Agoston at IMG Read Next: The post.

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Men’s Fashion Week and Couture Week Are Canceled in Paris

Chanel Spring 2020 Couture Show. Photo: GoRunway.com Those hoping for a return to fashion normalcy this summer will have to wait a little longer. French fashion’s governing body, the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, has officially canceled the upcoming men’s and couture fashion weeks. The spring 2021 men’s shows were originally scheduled for June 23 to 28; couture would have taken place several days later from July 5 to July 9. The Camera Nazionale della Moda, which oversees Italian fashion, has also just postponed its slate of men’s shows from June 19 to 23; they will now take place alongside its womenswear week in September. The CFDA is also advising American designers to not show Resort 2021 collections in May and June and has postponed its menswear week. In a release sent to the fashion industry, France’s Fédération writes, “In light of the spread of the worldwide, strong decisions are required to ensure the safety and health of houses, their employees, and everyone working in our industry.” While a cancellation of both weeks seems a wise choice amid the spread of the coronavirus—men’s and couture bring thousands of designers, models, editors, stylists, buyers, photographers, and other industry professionals to Paris—hope is not lost for the spring 2021 men’s and fall 2020 couture collections. “The Fédération is actively working with its members on possible alternatives,” the release concludes. The Camera Nazionale della Moda also promises new ways of exhibiting fashion. “We are working on new digital formats and new ways of encounter, in order to create a new storytelling on the days originally scheduled for the Milan Men’s Fashion Week: B2B and B2C platforms for the benefit of brands, luxury companies, and all the other players in the fashion industry,” reads a release from the group. Some of those alternatives could be digital fashion shows or virtual showrooms. The Camera Nazionale della Moda acknowledges that for many of its menswear designers, production has already started—or in some cases completed—for the spring 2021 shows, promising that its 800 Milan showrooms will help support sales during Milan’s market week at the end of June. Pitti Uomo has promised a similar virtual showroom to accompany its early June fair. As yet, Florence’s Pitti Uomo and London Fashion Week: Men’s, both of which are slated for the beginning of June, are still scheduled to take place. Still, the cancellation of menswear’s biggest weeks and the couture shows will cast a pall over the fashion industry, which is just one of many that has been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. Under precautions currently in place around the world, designers are struggling to produce collections, and projections for retail and luxury spending are not looking promising. In response, Vogue and the CFDA founded to raise funds for American fashion industry workers impacted by the crisis. Whether or not there are proper catwalks this June and July, we are staying optimistic that fashion’s show will go on. Originally published on Read Next: The post.

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Hassan Hajjaj Welcomes the World into His Playful Pop Kingdom Created in Morocco

Photographer Hassan Hajjaj, a master of pun and play, is bringing people closer by opening the doors to his wild, wild world – made in Morocco Hassan Hajjaj. Supplied Sometime in the 1990s,. Amid wafting aromas of spices and leather, gleaming stalls of metallic goods, bewitching snake charmers, performing Barbary macaques, and so much color and energy, Hajjaj’s models coiled as he shot what was baptized The Arab Issue. “I wanted to present our culture,” he says. “It wasn’t political, it was just fun and fashionable.” Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj That wasn’t the first time that Hajjaj wanted to present his culture. In fact, he has been doing so for almost four
decades, the seeds of which were planted with his arrival in. Hajjaj the elder hadn’t foreseen that his quest would take so long and called on his family to join him. Along Portobello Road and Camden Market, Hajjaj found parallels and intersections with the hustle and bustle of the Moroccan medina. “Morocco in the 70s and 80s was not perceived as a cool place. It was limited to the Sahara, mint tea, and kaftans,” he explains. Increasingly, he felt compelled to tell his friends where he was from, and so, a body of work was born. “It wasn’t meant to be art,” he says, frankly. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj Hajjaj dipped into the underground scene–fashion, films, clubs–and opened his own clothing store in Covent Garden, called R.A.P. (Real Artistic People), where everyone was welcome and where skin color, religion, politics, gender, origin, and all other (potentially) discriminatory labels were parked in parliament. It is no wonder, then, for an artist so embracing to have issue with a concept as alienating as Brexit. In April last year, Hajjaj staged The Path, an exhibition in response to the leaving the EU at the New Art Exchange, a contemporary arts space in Nottingham. “All of my subjects were in England, some born here, some raised here, some from Brazil, some from China, and elsewhere,” he says. “The Path was to show unity rather than division. It’s a small answer; it’s a reaction.” Sunny Rahbar, co-founder of, among others. Also Read: 00:00 / 00:00 Video View CountDo not alter this value. Validate Email There are three main takeaways from Hajjaj’s practice: commitment to truth, necessity of play, and pride in one’s origins. “Marrakech has an energy. Those are my roots. It’s there, the people, the traditions, the attitude, it’s all there. I’m just cooking it, making different dishes,” he explains. “I’m trying to turn things upside down but making sure it retains authenticity. I have to stay honest and truthful to what’s around me. I’m giving back to the community. And I like that very much.” In February, he put together a show of young and aspiring Moroccan women photographers as part of 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair’s programming in Marrakech. Play is central to Hajjaj’s life and is palpable in his work. Everything looks happy. The street is his canvas. The pictures radiate and Morocco is unmistakeable. It’s cool, it’s hip, it quickly brings you in – but how pop is it? Years ago, a journalist dubbed Hajjaj “the movie, a play on words birthed a brand. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj Over lunch with the late Algerian singer Rachid Taha in 2000, Hajjaj brought out prints of his older work that featured Arab products. Taha didn’t have anything to show Hajjaj and laughingly replied, “ma ‘andy wahloo,” meaning “I have nothing” in darija, Moroccan slang. Hajjaj dropped the “ma” and the apostrophe, and just like that, with a bit of fun on a pun, Andy Wahloo was born. Using Nido cans, Coca-Cola crates, road signs, and collected objects from the medina, a pop brand came to life and also begot a Parisian bar in 2003, which Hajjaj designed using the same ephemerae. A few years later, he was the mastermind bringing Riad Yima to life from an old fonduq in the city. Over three years, Hajjaj erected a jewel riad with a boutique gallery featuring his art, furniture, and products, and a tea room nestled among the spice market in the souq. He shoots on the ground floor, the second floor is an exhibition space, with his sleeping quarters on the third floor, filled with fabrics, clothing, and images. The rooftop hosts brainstorming sessions overlooking the city rooftops. The quintessential consumerist, Hajjaj saw that Moroccan memorabilia found new life in the frames of his vibrant photographs. The choice to line up red Coca-Cola cans, harissa tubes, or tomato-shaped ketchup dispensers is “the egg and chicken question,” he laughs, emphasizing that the be-all and end-all is the sitter. The subject is what delights him most. “Many of the people I shoot are already artists, so that makes it easy and also makes it like a performance,” he says. The decision to shoot all sing and dance throughout their shoots, with a live band playing traditional music. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj The concept of reprocessing and the idea of revisiting permeates Hajjaj’s philosophy. And to a certain degree, so does the fun in pun – The Arab Issue made a comeback in September 2019 at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in. “I want to present more from the region,” says Hajjaj. “I believe in the region – and it has believed in me.” Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia Read Next: The post.

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to Pay for Their Own Security in the US

Since stepping back from their royal duties, had relocated from their home in the UK to Canada, but they are now on the move again. According to a royal insider, the couple with their son has left Canada for good to set up a permanent home in Los Angeles, California. On Sunday, US President Trump tweeted that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will have to pay for their own security arrangements once they have moved to the United States. “I am a great friend and admirer of the Queen & the United Kingdom,” he tweeted. “It was reported that Harry and Meghan, who left the Kingdom, would reside permanently in Canada. Now they have left Canada for the US however, the US will not pay for their security protection. They must pay!” According to reports, a spokesperson for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stated that they “have no plans to ask the US government for security resources. Privately funded security arrangements have been made.” The family is also believed to be in isolation due to the ongoing spread of Covid-19 in the Hollywood area. Over the past few weeks, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have taken to their social media to share motivating messages for those affected by the pandemic and have thanked the healthcare workers fighting Covid-19. “Around the world, the response from people in every walk of life, to protect and look out for their communities has been inspiring,” they wrote on Instagram. “None more so than the brave and dedicated healthcare workers on the frontline, risking their own well-being to care for the sick and fight COVID-19. Wherever you are in the world, we are all incredibly grateful.” Starting April 1, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will no longer fulfill the official duties as royals and also let go of their His/Her Royal Highness titles. Read Next: The post.

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Should You Attempt an At Home Haircut? We Ask the Experts

Photo by element5-digital on Unsplash Step away from those scissors and put down that box of hair dye that’s been hiding out in the back of your vanity. Yes, we know you may have had to cancel your usual hair styling appointment. Yes, we know your roots might feel like they are down to your eyebrows and yes, we feel the same about our unruly mane which is getting more and more out of control as the days tick by. However, it’s not time to panic. After all, your work conference calls really aren’t that clear, and the delivery men have most likely seen far worse. If that’s not enough to change your mind, please don’t make your beloved hairstylist job any harder when life finally begins to turn back to normality. We promise you, it’s going to be hard to get an appointment with all the at-home cuts that will most likely have gone wrong. Still not convinced? Three of the region’s share their thoughts. Karl Warner, Senior Stylist, Pastels Salon Ritz Carlton “Absolutely never cut your hair at home yourself. If you do cut your hair at home, it will, inevitably, go wrong. You are not a trained professional and you could end up paying more, in the long run, to have it fixed. I would recommend that you contact the salon you usually visit and ask them if they can offer home services. If they do not offer such a service and you are self-isolating or you are in quarantine because you are sick, then you can wait to have it cut and during this time you could try out new styles. Instead of spending time cutting your hair, why not use this time to check out Pinterest and Instagram for inspiration on styles you could wear when your hair is a slightly longer length, or watch youtube tutorials to learn new ways of styling your hair!” Giphy Maria Dowling, Founder of Mariadowling Salon “Obviously I would always say don’t do it! Try and live with your existing haircut and color until you’re able to get into the salon if you can. The risks involved in hair coloring and hair cutting at home are completely different. If you cut your hair at home the hair will take time to grow back and you pretty much have to live with it until it does.  With color, the only risk is hair damage, particularly if you’re bleaching the hair, but you can always get your color corrected by visiting a salon who knows what they’re doing! Now we’re all at home, it’s a great time to practice new hair skills and. Get onto YouTube and learn how to wand your waves, practice a few updo’s or try to make some natural, at-home treatments.” Kate Darling, Founder of THT – That Hair Tho “For hair, we recommend that you do not panic with grown-out roots. It is never worth using box dye on your hair, as it will only damage all the amazing work your hairstylist has done to make it this fab! To maintain color, it is worth picking up or ordering a colored conditioner. This will help sustain the hair color for longer while also conditioning your hair. For the lucky ladies with balayage, you should have no problem rocking your roots, and should just focus on using hair masks and oil treatments until this is all over. Cutting your own hair is also not advised, no matter how bored you get. Please don’t do it! Keep positive and just think how much fun your stylist will have with your long locks once you’re both reunited. If you cut it yourself and the results are not what you wanted, it will be even harder for your stylist to correct. The best way to manage your hair over this time is through hair masks and oil treatments. This is a great time to experiment with 100%, some key ingredients we would recommend are coconut oil, aloe vera, castor oil, and avocado. Apply, leave on and turn on Netflix. The longer you leave them on, the better. This will help prevent any split ends until you are reunited with your hairstylist again. You can also enjoy treating your hair at home with Olaplex or Davines hair masks too. Read Next: The post.

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Don’t Do This At Home: The Beauty Myths to Stop Believing

Photo by Phalinda Long on Unsplash The internet is full of advice, tips, and tricks. When it comes to beauty if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If it sounds a bit strange you should also most likely stay clear. Here, we break some of the industry’s biggest myths. Remember, if you’re ever in doubt always speak to an.  You should only be using natural products. Although a lot of these products are amazing, the beauty industry isn’t as regulated as it should it be so don’t always be fooled by products that call themselves, clean or organic. Instead, do your research checking labels and ingredient lists. Also depending on the issue, all-natural ingredients won’t always offer the best benefits for your skin. You should be exfoliating once a day. Over exfoliating, the skin is one of the worst things you can do. It can lead to excess water loss, dryness, sensitivity to the sun and even cause micro-tears in the dermis. Even for those with oily skin, over-exfoliating can send the sebaceous glands into overdrive making the problem worse. Aim to exfoliate two to three times a week and test out different methods from manual to chemical and electronic. You should always double cleanse. When you wear makeup, a double cleanse might be essential to remove it properly. This is also the case for those who find they become oily by midday. For those who don’t or who are going bare-faced a single cleanse isn’t necessary. You should put toothpaste on a pimple. Stop! And, read the label of your toothpaste. It most likely contains harsh additives that you shouldn’t be applying to. Instead, look for products that have been specially formulated for pimples. If your makeup contains SPF you don’t need to apply another sunscreen. Reapplication aside, most makeup doesn’t contain an adequate amount of sunscreen to protect your skin. Instead, always use a broad-spectrum formula under your makeup of at least SPF30 and above. You can get rid of cellulite. For many women especially as they grow older, cellulite just becomes a part of life. No lotion or potion is going to completely get rid of it, but they can help reduce its appearance alongside a and exercise. Added to that, there’s nothing more empowering than embracing your body and all of its imperfections.  Plucking grey hairs cause several more to grow back in its place. When you tweeze away just one hair, only that hair follicle will be affected. Yes, it may grow back grey, but it won’t cause the other hairs around it too as well. You can repair split ends. Split ends are a sign of damaged and unhealthy hair. Although many products claim to fix them there’s no way of reconstructing a hair that has split. Instead, opt for a trim and always use be gentle with hair investing in quality formulas and tools. Read Next: The post.

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Farida Khelfa in Conversation with Jean Paul Gaultier on Life, Fashion, and the Future

As the curtain falls on his last couture show, Jean Paul Gaultier and his forever muse, Algerian-French model and filmmaker Farida Khelfa, sit down for an intimate chat about life, fashion, and the future Farida Khelfa and Jean Paul Gaultier photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Laughter echoes across the soaring spaces inside the are engrossed in each other’s presence. While this very well may be their last Vogue photo shoot together, posing in the designer’s ultimate haute couture collection, along with iconic pieces from former seasons from a career spanning 50 years, neither is ready nor wanting to throw in the towel, just yet. FARIDA KHELFA Your last haute couture show. What was going through your mind?
JEAN PAUL GAULTIER I had been thinking about this particular fashion show for some time. Everything was ready, we had invaded the Châtelet theater at the last minute – we couldn’t arrive earlier because there was a previous performance – and I had the shock of experiencing a feeling like it was my first show, not my last. I thought, oh my, the theater is packed. I felt the same panic as I did at my first show in 1976 but I also felt an uncontrollable joy. I thought to myself, I have to let go. I’m always there fixing the sleeves, but this time, I let everything go. I wanted to live it. I was thinking, no, this isn’t the right hair and this isn’t the right makeup, but everything started, and I too, consciously, decided to also take pleasure in the moment, in the magic. It was magnificent, beautiful, and amusing. It was moving because all these people who incarnated – and still do – my vision of fashion had come together. And of course, for me, it was essential that you be there with us. I couldn’t have done this show without you. FK During the opening tableau I felt overcome with emotion. To begin, I thought, don’t fall! [Laughing] It was very moving. Backstage, it was beautiful. There was a real intimacy among all the women and many people found themselves together again after many years. There was an atmosphere that I had never experienced at any show. Then, on stage, a movie by William Klein was projected for this opening scene and I remembered we had filmed with him, for two days, at Mouffetard. It was a great fashion film. Everything washed over me in that moment and I thought, wow. On the topic of your vision of fashion, this last collection featured 200 of 250 couture looks created with recycled fabrics. And yet, this is something you have always done. Also Read: Farida Khelfa and Jean Paul Gaultier photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 JPG Yes, I was forced to for lack of money. We had no money, but we had ideas. In hindsight, this also helped me find my own style. I took things from the street and transformed them. The tutu and the perfecto. Hybrid clothing. Mix and match. FK That was then; now, you certainly have the means to make a collection as you desire and you still chose to create with this same spirit for repurposing fabrics. JPG My parents were modest. During the second world war, my mother had taken a pair of pants belonging to my father and made herself a skirt, because she couldn’t afford the fabric. I love this spirit. Today we’re not at war, but I still love to mix and match. Take three items of clothing and mix them together to create something new. Find a new significance and geometry from the combination of the sophistication of haute couture and the biker spirit from the street. Take a perfecto and make new sleeves with feathers. It’s a renaissance. Haute couture recycling. Actually, we’ve regularly done this with our haute couture clients. They bring me their dresses and we alter them. Give them new life. FK I love a Gaultier suit. They are the most beautiful and with the best cut. The day of the show, I wore a Gaultier spencer jacket, which I have had for a long time, and the shoulders are exactly what we see in the magazines today. That says something. Very few people make beautiful shoulders. For me, that’s what is most important, in regards to couture. Your ready-to-wear has beautiful shoulders, too. I also have a weakness for trench coats. It’s what I love the most. I have many, from the Eighties. These are quality clothes. You touched on the fact that we are not at war, but in a way, we are fighting a war on consumption. Farida Khelfa photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 Also Read: JPG I love fashion; it’s my passion and it’s my life. But there are too many clothes. There aren’t enough people to wear them all. We’re at a point where we have to know what we’re good at instead of trying to do everything. Sometimes, there are wars between fashion groups, that strive to eliminate the other. And so they do everything, and too much. Today, there are streets lined with boutiques with clothes from new designers but when you are a visual person, and you see so many images of new clothes – which really aren’t so new after all – you go, next, next, next, not wanting anything at all. FK It’s an overdose. And such poor quality. Personally, I’m looking for a beautiful piece, not a seasonal item. I thought that the message that you gave for your last couture show was magisterial. If we have talent, we can retouch and re-twist a piece. If you can’t, maybe you should do something else. Even with regards to food – when you consider that people throw food out and cover it with bleach so people can’t eat it, or burn clothes, I feel sick. We need to get a grip on our responsibilities. JPG We are all responsible. Luxury has become industrial. So since we have so many clothes, why not go back and redo them in an artisanal way? Instead of killing ourselves to “be first,” we need to instead consider what are the real needs of today. Farida Khelfa photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 FK We need to return to local artistry. We have the savoir faire. For me, luxury is rarity. If it’s everywhere, it’s something else… JPG Vulgarity. FK It’s up to the youth to show us. I’ve seen young Arab designers create remarkable things – often the lack of money forces you to find solutions – I’ve seen them go to landfills and create incredible pieces from garbage. JPG What I’d like to say isn’t a critique, but an observation. Today, a fashion designer’s dream is to enter a group, to have the chauffeur, a certain life, and to be famous right away. This brings about careers where they lose themselves afterwards in the competition, and they’re not thinking about what the moment and epoch actually need. They get lost amid inter-designer competition. The proof that none of this is sustainable is that we don’t even talk about what dress we liked but what designer is going where and who is going to be the number one. FK Exactly. It’s musical chairs. I would even go further to say that the front row at a show has become even more important than the runway itself. It’s a problem. Imagine if we start filming the people who are in the front row of a concert instead of the star on-stage. It means that something is not working. Farida Khelfa photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 JPG And when we film, what do we do? The model arrives, she turns, we’re already looking at the photo – did we get it? Oh, quick! Another model is coming out. No one is looking at the back! Ha! Now there’s an idea for a collection. Have two girls come out with the same look, one wearing the front, one wearing the back. That would be funny. Fashion is also about emotion, desire, the dream. How can we have any of that if we’re busy taking photos? Now, our emotions our virtual; they aren’t real. FK After 50 years of career and real emotions, do you feel sad? What is next for you?JPG It was just a mise-en-bouche! [Laughter] My goodbyes were just my goodbyes to fashion as I have practiced it thus far. You know, Fashion Freak Show was the beginning of my adieu, all this rhythm of the shows… Couture will go on, but without me. I will give advice, there will be a new concept, and I will be something of an ambassador of the brand – after all, it is my name. I have chosen my successor and I will be at the shows, but in the audience. And I will also go and see my friends who interest me. I’ve seen shows by Mugler where he went all-out that were extraordinary; the same for Kawakubo. I’ve had moments of love at first sight for the work of Martin Margiela, who was an assistant for me. I adore Galliano. There are many – I think Iris van Herpen is fantastic. Farida Khelfa photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 I’ll always do something. All my career I’ve done things I never thought I would do – an album, television, cinema costumes, costumes for Madonna, Kylie Minogue, or Boy George – someone who really represented such freedom. These are stars I admire, and who purchased my clothes. Yes, that was normal! You worked and were paid for that work. Now, it’s a different time. You make contracts so that people wear your work. And frankly, that hurts me – to pay someone to wear your clothes. I started doing fashion in the first place to be loved. I did it with enthusiasm, with the enthusiasm of a child. It was all a bit bohemian and bordélique. Now, I’m ready to stop because the rhythm is somewhat tiring. Also, everything is centered more on marketing rather than pure creativity. I’ve always been free and I want to continue that way. FK Personally, I want to work. My kids are grown; they are at university. I need to re-center myself and not just work to work but to help others. I’ve been fortunate in my life and this chance should be shared, be it through film, documentaries, or with associations. Maybe I can help people, in France. When you arrive in Paris and you see all these tents, mass migrations, you can’t just throw these people into the sea. We need to do concrete things. It didn’t call me before, but it does now. Also, there is my work with the Middle East – I love going to Arab countries and working with young designers. Transmit and share. Farida Khelfa photographed by The Bardos for Vogue Arabia March 2020 JPG You have the talent. FK My first film was about you. JPG I said yes right away because I had confidence in you. Regardless, I was surprised at how precise and clean your vision was. Aesthetically it was perfect, too. You’re also a great actor. You have so many talents; you have to do it all. And of course, we have to keep working together, too. FK Absolutely. We haven’t finished our work together. I think that in France, we devalue working. It’s as if working is perceived as degrading. What we don’t say enough to people is that unemployment is what is degrading. That’s when we start to degrade physically and mentally – when we are unemployed. Work is what keeps you going. It keeps you alive. It wakes you up in the morning. It’s so important in one’s life. Maybe at another time we could spend a life without working but it would not go well. It never does. Not working is catastrophic for people. We need to be busy and the best way to do that is to work, and besides, one needs to earn a living. JPG I agree with everything you say. In the 1970s, I remember government officials would arrive for work and take one-and-a-half hours to take out their dossiers. Then they would calculate how they would earn their extra days off, and then go for lunch, and one hour before their time was up they would start packing their briefcases. I know that at the time there were people who were satisfied to be paid for not working. It’s something of a French mentality. I myself remember taking the metro and sliding under the bar to get a free ride. I was a kid. France is a marvelous country, with many beautiful things, and beautiful ideas, but to realize them takes hard work. Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia Read Next: The post.

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3 Easy Ways to Start Your Day Right

Photo by Adam Le Sommer on Unsplash Are you the type of person that jumps straight out of bed when your alarm goes off or do you press snooze as often as time will allow? Although there have been studies that have looked into what effect your genes have on your waking preferences, you may be surprised, DNA aside, that you can actually have some control over it yourself.  Soniyaa Kiran Punjabi the founder of Well Being Center in Dubai and Abu Dhabi shares her rituals for ensuring she starts her day off in the right way. A good morning starts with a solid night’s sleep. Lack of sleep is one of the primary triggers leading to health concerns. Poor sleep will make you feel miserable, while quality deep will almost always make feel positive about starting your day. Give importance to the last five minutes of the night before. The last five minutes of your day, before you enter into your sleep state, are the most important ones. What you impress upon your subconscious mind is what it will offer you in your waking hours. Feed your mind wisely. Have an attitude of gratitude. Several psychological and scientific studies now prove how being grateful can benefit your, body, and brain. Spend the first few minutes in the morning thinking of five things to be grateful for and you will notice the positive benefits in your life. Read Next: The post.

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Vogue Arabia April Issue Sends A Message Of Hope In A Time Of Quarantine

From refugee to fashion darling, cover star Eman Deng’s rise to fame is the positive story we need during these tough times. Photography: Carla Guler As the world struggles to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, now more than ever it is important for us all to connect. As such, our April issue highlights the importance of union and fraternity, focusing on stories of hope and love during times of. In a celebration of humanity, the publication’s 35th edition is dedicated to remarkable individuals across the globe – those who have succeeded against the odds and inspired us through their triumphs. From the Arab medical staff helping in the fight against the coronavirus to and migrants who chased and achieved their dreams. For one of our two covers, Vogue Arabia teamed up with French-Tunisian artist eL Seed to create a typography cover – because sometimes simplicity and words are all we need to send a strong message. “Bringing people, culture, and generations together through Arabic calligraphy is what I do,” explains eL Seed, whose on the cover reads united. “As an artist, I feel it creates an emotion with anyone, even if you don’t read Arabic. There is a universal beauty you don’t need to translate; it touches your soul before it reaches your eyes. We are all connected.” el Seed wrote the word “United” in calligraphy for the April 2020 issue The second cover stars Eman Deng, a Sudanese model on the rise who fled her war-torn country as a refugee. When sectarian violence erupted in Sudan, she was forced to flee with her mother and siblings to neighboring Uganda. Now, at 19, Deng is flipping that traumatic history on its head. After being scouted on Instagram, she is fast conquering the runways, walking for Thom Brown and Rick Owens and working with Chalayan and Halpern. In our exclusive interview and shoot by Carla Guler, Deng opens up about being a refugee, finding her feet in the industry – and her wishes of returning to her homeland one day. “I believed that the only time you could be separated from your family was when you die; war taught me this is not the case,” she shares. “I hope that by sharing my story I can inspire others to be strong and stand up.” Cover star Eman Deng. Photography Carla Guler While the two covers are less conventional for the Vogue brand – it veers from the typical high-glamour and big celebrity covers – Editor-and-Chief Manuel Arnaut feels it is important to lead the way forward with positivity, reaching out to the community at a time when we all need inspiration and upliftment. “At Vogue we are trying to look at it from a positive angle, and learn some lessons,” explains Arnaut. “These troubled times made me realize that some of the things that make us human is our capacity to connect with others, but also to thrive under less than favorable conditions. Therefore, at Vogue Arabia, we are dedicating this issue to inspiring individuals who succeeded against the odds.” “I can’t help but feel touched by Eman’s emotional testimony,” he adds. “Since the topic of migration is so relevant in the Arab world – with Saudi Arabia opening its borders and countries like the UAE being mainly populated by economic migrants – this April we further explore this idea of belonging (or not) with stories told in the first person by individuals I truly admire:.” Tunisian supermodel and Prabal Gurung and singer Selena Gomez remember their diverse pasts and how it has enriched their journeys. Ora’s family fled Yugoslavia (present-day Kosovo) in 1991. Escaping persecution, they sought out a new life in London. “They left behind their whole lives and had to start from scratch when they arrived in London as refugees,” explains the singer. “But protecting us was their main priority, and I count my blessings every day that they did what they did.” While Gomez has managed to live the American dream, she is aware others have not been so lucky. “My family chose to leave Mexico to pursue the American dream. In the 1970s, my aunt crossed the border hidden in the back of a truck,” she explains, adding, “My thoughts on life in America? I have said that I don’t claim to be an expert and I understand that there have to be rules and regulations, but we have to do better than what we are doing – we simply have to. I hope we can still offer the American dream. I hope we can still offer people a better life. It’s so important to remember our country was formed by those who came from other countries.” Front line heroes in Lebanon. The April issue – which still contains the usual fashion and beauty inspiration and trends –. “We are paying a heartfelt homage to all the doctors, nurses, and other medical-related professionals with a powerful portfolio captured by Tarek Moukaddem,” says Arnaut. “Tarek was brave enough to accept our challenge to photograph real-life heroes from the Rafik Hariri Hospital to the Lebanese Red Cross. A big thank you to all of them, not just as a magazine editor, but as a fellow citizen.” Now is a time to unite. Together we are stronger. Read now: UAE Residents Can Now Get Tested for Covid-19 in Five Minutes The post.

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Tunisia Becomes the First Country to Honor a Female Doctor with a Banknote

Tawhida Ben Cheikh on Tunisia’s ten dinar banknote. Photo: Central Bank of Tunisia A pioneer in women’s medicine, late doctor Tawhida Ben Cheikh has been honored by by issuing a ten dinar note dedicated to her —  a first for the country. Born in 1909, the Tunisian doctor had been the country’s first female one, having been the first girl to pass the baccalaureate in Tunisia in 1928, and graduate from the faculty of medicine of Paris in 1936. Announcing the circulation of the banknote as legal tender on Thursday, Abdelaziz bin Said, Director of the Public Treasury of the Central Bank of Tunisia, said that this decision had been made a year ago in order to “honor Tunisian women”. Not only had Ben Cheikh been the first female doctor in Tunisia, but she reportedly was also the first female doctor to practice modern medicine in the Middle East and North Africa region. A physician, pediatrician, as well as a gynecologist, Ben Cheikh is renowned mainly for her work in women’s medicine, gynecology, and for her selfless work with non-profit organizations. She had been the Vice-President of the Tunisian Red Crescent and after family planning had been legalized in Tunisia in 1973, went on to become the founder of the country’s first family planning clinic. The path to the peak of her successful career, however, was not easy. Even after having graduated as a doctor in 1936 at the age of 27, Ben Cheikh had to wait until 1955 to head the maternity department of Charles-Nicolle hospital in Tunis. In 1959, Ben Cheikh became the first woman to sit on the National Council of the Order of Physicians of Tunisia. While Ben Cheikh is the first female doctor to appear on a banknote worldwide, she is not the first female to appear on a banknote in the Arab world. Previously, the ten dinar Tunisian banknote used to feature Dido, also known as Queen Elissa. Read Next: The post.

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How to Achieve Glowing Skin Without Leaving the House

Photography Marcel A Mayer If you’re stuck indoors there’s no excuse to let your beauty routine slip. In fact, it’s time to take it up a notch. There’s nothing better than healthy and but as you know it takes time and work. On the bright side, you now should have plenty of that. Here three of the region’s top experts share their tips on how to achieve it, whilst you are sat in the comfort of your very own home. Photography Marcel A Mayer Rebecca Treston, Founder of The Rebecca Treston Method If you aren’t wearing makeup because you aren’t going to work, do not double cleanse, one cleanse is enough because you don’t want to overdo it and eliminate all the natural oils from the skin. During the day apply antioxidants like products that contain vitamins C & E. They will give your skin a glow, but more importantly, will combat any exposure to free radicals. Ensure you use a product that has Hyaluronic Acid to deeply moisturize the skin and follow this step with a skin-specific moisturizer to soothe your skin. In the evening cleanse and use a mild acid toner to exfoliate the skin so that your dermis can repair overnight. This will be a vitamin A-based or Retinol-based product or something that has AHAs or BHAs, depending on your skin type. with either Vitamin E or moisturizing cream to help repair your skin. Photography Marcel A Mayer Lana Kashlan, CosmeSurge Dubai As we are all focusing on hand hygiene and trying not to touch our faces, now is a great time to start incorporating cleansing brushes like Foreo’s Luna 3 to your morning and nighttime routine. I like the Luna 3 in particular because the silicone bristles don’t harbor bacteria like regular bristles. Just because you’re not leaving the house doesn’t mean you should stop your daily antioxidant and SPF routine either. UVA penetrates through glass so sun damage can occur through the windows. I like LaRoche Posay’s Anthelios SPF50 Mineral Sunscreen Gentle Lotion for an easy combination of antioxidants and sun protection. I’d also recommend a brightening treatment like a light chemical peel. I like Dr. Dennis Gross Clinical Grade Resurfacing liquid peel, but no more than twice a week. This peel is a combination of lactic acid, glycolic acid, and bromelain for a light exfoliation that will help shrink pores and lighten hyperpigmentation. Photography Marcel A Mayer Onuma Saput, Beauty & Laser Therapist at The Nova Clinic A short and simple skincare regime will keep your skin feeling hydrated and refreshed in between your normal facial program. At Nova, we recommend a facial every four-to-six weeks, depending on your skin type. Throughout the period in between, make sure that you are thoroughly cleansing your face twice a day with a fragrance-free cleanser and removing all your make up before you fall asleep. Once a week, exfoliate your skin with a gentle but effective facial exfoliator. Ideally, pick one that has Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHA) within the formula. AHA’s are plant and animal-derived acids which can be found in a variety of skincare products. To keep your skin looking and feeling hydrated, use a underneath your sunscreen. I recommend Skinceuticals CE Ferulic serum. Every day make sure that you’re using moisturizer to help prevent dry flaky skin and encourage your skin cells to naturally heal and grow. It’s best to apply it when your skin is wet from rinsing your face as it will lock in extra moisture instead of working on the surface level to make your face feel smooth. Finally, and most importantly, make sure that you’re drinking lots of water to keep your skin and body feeling hydrated from the inside, which in turn will keep it soft and supple. Photography Marcel A Mayer Hair & Makeup Katrin Burtscher Post Production Alexander Au Yeong and Felix Anselmi Model Tiffany Winteler  Read Next: The post.

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16 Muslim Influencers with Modern Modest Fashion

Halima Aden, Ikram Abdi Omar, and Amina Adan. Photographed by Txema Yeste for Vogue Arabia April 2019. Far from encompassing solely the Muslim community, modest fashion is quickly becoming a more inclusive way of dressing for women — regardless of religious and cultural background. Around the world, modest style influencers are using their social media platforms to amplify the voices calling for more covered ensembles and the mainstream fashion industry is taking notice. From fashion week runways touting longer, loose-fitting collections to starring in leading campaign shoots, the concept of modest dressing is being constantly redefined to represent the growing influence of the modest community. Acting as a voice for modest fashion on the streets of their hometowns and the feeds of our digital networks, these visionary bloggers boasting thousands of followers each are unapologetically themselves, shifting the global perspective of modesty with their unique personal style and signature looks. With creative layering, statement accessories, and imaginative headwraps, modest-wear has never been so accessible so it only makes sense to turn to the experts for guidance. Scroll through the gallery below for a look at our some of our favorite modest style muses that continue to welcome more women into the folds of this timeless trend and empower those who do choose to dress modestly. Khaoula Boumeshouli, @khaoulaboumeshouli. This Amsterdam-based entrepreneur not only wears elegant ensembles around the world but is also the owner of Shop Modiq, a boutique touting modest designs for the contemporary woman. Fatema Al Awadhi, @justfatema This Kuwaiti fashion blogger has mastered the art of power suiting with bold colors and fun accents, often transforming a classic look to a haute modern-day approach. Lana Hattab, @lanahattab Based in Dubai, this Emirati-Palestinian influencer provides everyday inspo for conservative dressing with a blend of affordable pieces and designer accessories no matter the occasion. Noor Elkhaldi, @noore Often photographed traipsing the streets of her Florida hometown in an effortless mix of stylish layers, this fashion-forward influencer is also the host of the weekly podcast Arab-American Psycho, which shares her musings on life and invites other Arab women guest stars to do the same. Shahd Batal, @shahdbatal This Sudanese-American was one of the first few hijab-wearing YouTube stars and is continuing to make waves in the fashion industry with her elevated street style that is chockfull of statement pieces, like this mustard trench. Marwa Meme Biltagi, @mademoisellememe Celebrated as a modest fashionista, this Irish-Palestinian often collaborates with leading luxury brands, presenting chic combinations that play with different textures to emulate a ladylike aesthetic that is anything but one-dimensional. Leena Al Ghouti, @leenalghouti A Dubai-based instagrammer who likely needs no introduction, Al Ghouti is a proponent of premium streetwear embedded with her own inimitable edge and signature over-the-shoulder black hijab. Nia Amroun, @niaamroun This Londoner living in Riyadh is a longtime supporter of Arab designers, donning minimalist ensembles that favorite seamless silhouettes and earthy tones, whether it's a linen abaya or knitted matching set. Saufeeya Goodson, @saufeeya This Dubai-based it girl and fashion week regular exudes confidence with glamorous outfits steeped in Middle Eastern culture or retro Hollywood glamor. Aydha Mehnaz, @aydhamehnaz Known for championing comfortable yet structured pieces from patterned oversized blazers to tailored trousers, this Bangladeshi communications coordinator in Paris occasionally complements her no-nonsense outfits with a pop of traditional accessories from hometown flea markets. Soha Mohamed Taha, @sohamt An Egyptian designer with an enviable closet, Taha explores the power of adventurous modestwear with abayas and bishts rooted in the season's hottest trends. Summer Albarcha, @summeralbarcha A Syrian-American content creator with an endless collection of versatile go-to pieces for the young modest generation. Yousra Zein, @hayekk_ This emerging Swiss-Tunisian style blogger is a model for solid color-blocking combinations and vintage-inspired motifs reminiscent of her current European location. Maria Alia, @mariaalia This half-Palestinian can be found photographed throughout New York City's concrete jungle with imaginative ensembles emblematic of her thrift shop finds and cool attitude. Hajra Atariqq, @hajra_aaa Featuring a palette of pretty pastels and muted neutrals in dresses and skirts made for twirling, this Pakistani influencer is a vision of modest femininity. Imane Asry, @fashionwithfaith A self-proclaimed digital creator based in Stockholm, Asry is a veteran modest blogger who opts for a simple Scandinavian style that packs a subtle punch. 1 Read Next: The post.

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How to Maintain Your Tan When You are Stuck Inside

Photography Yulia Gorbachenko There is no better feeling than having a feel the effects of being inside for too long. If you aren’t lucky enough to have a balcony or garden to catch some vitamin D whilst #StayingAtHome then it might be time to start turning to the world of fake tan. PREP Hero product: First things first, exfoliating is essential – think of fake tan like painting a table, which you need to sand down to ensure it’s as smooth as possible before applying any color. Soak in a hot bath or shower to soften your skin, then using a pair of scrubbing gloves with a dollop of creamy body wash, massage over your entire body in brisk circular motions. Rinse with a blast of cold water to help close your pores before drying off. When it comes to your face, do any dermaplaning (hair removal) or strong acids a day or two before tanning – we recommend running a flannel or muslin cloth under warm water to gently cleanse and buff off all dull and dead skin. Tip: Exfoliating the evening before gives your skin a chance to heal and regenerate overnight, which will make your tan last longer. SMOOTH Hero product: Next, layer on any serums in your skincare routine and apply a body lotion to areas prone to dryness – think knees, elbows, ankles, and underarms. Lotions formulated with rich oils tend to leave a greasy film/residue on your skin, which may interfere with the tan’s adherence, so go for a more lightweight option. THE BODY Hero product: Applying the actual color is the real fake-it or break-it moment in every at-home tanning routine. We’ve found using a velvet-finished mitt coupled with a mousse (quick to dry and easy to apply) to be the most effortless route to getting a flawless finish. Shake the bottle well, add a few pumps to a mitt and start at your calves working your way up and blending out in swift circular movements – if you begin in your mid-section, bending over can cause the color to crease on your stomach. Use any leftover product on the mitt to gently rub over the feet and the back of your hands. THE FACE Hero product: Tanning your face is a completely different ballgame to the body, so we advise using two different formulas – body fake bakes tend to be darker and can sit in your pores or give brows and hairlines a tangerine tint. Tanning drops that can be mixed in with your usual serum or cream will give the most subtle hint of color, or try a self-tan with added skincare benefits, such as Sisley’s new Self Tanning Hydrating Facial Skin Care – this multitasking fluid comes packed with plant-based active ingredients that work to deeply moisturize while delivering a healthy sun-kissed glow. Tip: Be careful around your hairline and eyebrows. If your hair is fair, stay on the safe side and avoid staining by running a damp cotton bud through brows to fully remove excess product.    FIX Hero product: Even seasoned fake tanning pros make mishaps – perhaps your skin is more dry than usual or you’ve been too heavy-handed around your ankles. Enter Bondi Sand’s game-changing Self Tan Eraser. In just five minutes the formula will remove telltale patchiness and stubborn streaks to leave you looking believably faux bronzed. Photography Yulia Gorbachenko | Style Sandy Armeni | Makeup: Christine Cherbonnier @ The Wall Group using Kjaer Weis and ASEA Skincare | Hair Sadek Lardjane | Model Natalie Ogg @ The Society Management New York | Botanical Artist Lutfi Janania  Read Next: The post.

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Exclusive: Emel Mathlouthi’s Latest Album is a Heartfelt Plea to the World

Emel Mathlouthi’s third full-length album “Everywhere We Looked Was Burning” is a powerful journey of destruction and hope. Photo courtesy of Emel Mathlouthi. Although Tunisian singer-songwriter Emel Mathlouthi is renowned for singing poignant melodies about freedom and justice for her homeland, the experimental artist has set her heart on a much bigger plea for her third album: The Earth. Three years in the making, Everywhere We Looked Was Burning was released in September, debuting ten tracks that illustrate the harmonious sounds of nature and the limitless power of humanity if we work together to protect the planet on which we live. Mathlouthi first rose to worldwide fame with her protest song Kelmti Horra (“My Word is Free”), which became the anthem for the Tunisian revolution and Arab Spring almost a decade ago and garnered her an invitation to perform at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in 2015. Now, New York-based Mathlouthi sings almost entirely in English for the first time, continuing to pursue her mission of spreading the vibrant music of the region and her passionate message of hope in unity to the world without being typecasted or exoticized by the West. Vogue Arabia spoke to Mathlouthi six months after the launch of her album to hear about one of the most acclaimed Arab avant-garde artists of this generation’s journey and share an exclusive first look at her latest music video. How does it feel to be known as “The Voice of the Tunisian Revolution?” It is a huge honor. To have any kind of association with such an incredible and historic moment is something unique in one’s lifetime, not to mention having the privilege to be respected for my voice, my music, and my contribution to the revolution. It does, however, have its downsides. While I am deeply proud and honored to have been an important part of the world’s only modern successful revolution, it can feel a bit lonely and limiting because the western world tends to box us—artists from the Arab region—as if we can only be part of the conversation through politics. I am an artist first and foremost, and I continue to grow and evolve and would like the world to see me for who I am with all its diverse sides: A revolutionary yes, a Tunisian yes, but also a composer, a pioneer, a producer, an innovator, and an avant-garde artist. At some point, the music has to be at the center of the interest. What was life like for you growing up in Tunisia? I come from a middle-class family, both of my parents were teachers when they worked. My father is also a committed intellectual and my mother comes from a family where agriculture was important, mostly olive oil.  Some of my first memories are of my father playing lots of classical music for us in our house on Sundays, or all of us together at the beach near Sousse for vacations. I am grateful to have been raised in a secular and intellectual atmosphere while also having deep roots in my Tunisian culture and traditions. I am particularly lucky to have been raised with the love of music and literature; I think that’s the best gift we can give our kids. Education was very, very important for my parents, which was good. I just wish that parents in our countries would also encourage their kids’ artistic talents. Mine didn’t, so I had to carve my way through and I quickly developed my artistic passion in my own secret world. At 18, I was known to be THE high school singer and I had a great group of friends and a band, mostly sharing the love of freedom, revolution, and rock’n’roll—so cliché but so true! We all knew we were living under a massive dictatorship where nothing was encouraging us to become free thinkers or creatives; we had to follow the rules and blend in and not talk smart or clever. So, music helped me a lot through those years. I call them the emptiness years, but music and idealism made me feel so strong and I believed in myself and my own power through art, which made me the person I am today and helped me develop my creative drive. From a young age, I was very conscious of the many challenges Tunisians were facing and wanted to find a way to help from my perspective. So I wrote songs, songs that eventually landed on my first album Kelmi Horra and some even on my second album Ensen. At what stage in your life did you get into music? I first started to sing and act at seven and to improvise and create songs at about ten.  I was entirely self-taught. I learned by singing, Cheikh Imam, and Marcel Khalifa. I felt I found my life’s purpose⁠—singing for social justice and freedom, singing to create art and push all genre boundaries. Eventually I started writing my own lyrics and started my songwriting adventure. In Tunisian Arabic and literally Arabic as well. I wanted to do more than interpret the work of others. I wanted to write my own songs and be in charge of my own bands and creative process, and somehow I made it. “My recent album is a call to humanity to get our act together and to save our planet for future generations.” Photo courtesy of Emel Mathlouthi Also Read: How do you think your Tunisian identity has shaped you as a female musician and artist? It has shaped me very thoroughly. is a kind of unique place. We are part of Africa, we are part of the Arab world, we are part of the Mediterranean region. We are so strongly influenced by all of these and I think I bring a sense of all these cultures in my art. Growing up, I listened to old Tunisian tunes from the 30s and classical European music, turned to heavy metal as a teen, then to divas and protest songwriters a bit later; I’m a huge mix! Being Tunisian also exposed me to the struggles for freedom that we waged and the sweet feeling of having succeeded, followed by all the confusion of not knowing which way to go next. I am proud to share my music as a Tunisian. My fans in Tunisia, and in other Arab countries or countries in the region like Turkey, are so important to me. It is also a joy to sometimes be seen as a voice for Arab diasporas, like when I was given an award for conscientious artistic expression by the Arab American Institute. But I have to say my Tunisian identity has also allowed me to see some of the strangeness and injustice in the music world. For what I suppose are business reasons, the music market has felt compelled to create categories and the category I am usually put into is something called World Music. I never really understood what that meant, but I am sure there is some old-fashioned prejudice behind it. In the West or North, artists like me are given very few opportunities to participate as equals, and when we try to grow beyond the market’s limited understanding of us, we are often pushed to the side. But I will keep fighting for all of us, and be at peace with my “Tunisianity”⁠— whatever that means⁠—in my voice, my lyrics, my melodies, or my soul. What do you think it was about your debut album Kelmti Horra that resonated with so many people? Honestly, I think it is the quality of the songs, the songwriting, the musicality, and the truth and uniqueness of the production and genre. I put everything into that album. It was years and years of work. I funneled all my rage, my emotions, my will for all the years I spent dreaming it and conceiving it. It was also very much an album of its times. In the album, I spoke for freedom, for justice, for dignity, for understanding. It seems strange to say now, but that was enormously risky at that time and I suffered a lot. I think people feel that yearning and that vulnerability, that sense of risk and that commitment to a better tomorrow; I hope it continues to inspire people around the world. Did becoming a mother have an influence on your songwriting? If so, how? Probably; it must have reawakened my sense of innocent and free exploration. Watching my daughter play, be herself, react to the world has helped me understand the pureness and joy that is fundamental to all people. She has helped me to create more freely and more fully. I can also say that when I am down, my daughter is an enormous boost that helps me keep going forward.  In my new album, she also makes a cameo. She can be heard in the background playing in a song called A Quiet Home. She’s a bundle of joy, energy, and creativity⁠—she amazes every day and I take a lot of inspiration from her! “I will keep fighting for all of us, and be at peace with my Tunisianity—whatever that means—in my voice, my lyrics my melodies or my soul.” Photo courtesy of Emel Mathlouthi What was it like to perform at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony and Concert in 2015? It was awesome⁠—probably my most special experience to date. I was so, so proud to represent Tunisia on those important stages for all the world to see. The ceremony itself was an amazing chance to honor all Tunisians, including the Tunisian Quartet who won the award. And the concert was a much bigger deal than I was expecting; it was watched live around the world by millions. It was a very important stage and a great chance to share Tunisia, to share my voice⁠—the voice of an Arab free woman⁠—and my music⁠—music without borders⁠—with the world. I am eternally grateful for that chance. Much of your inspiration for songwriting is drawn from nature, why is that? Yes, especially in recent years as my songwriting has moved a bit away from the political, I have found a lot of joy in contemplating nature in my work.  My writing process involves deep immersion in nature and my recent album is a call to humanity to get our act together and to save our planet for future generations. Nature brings me that peace that disconnects me with all the unnecessary noises and distractions of the world; it relaxes me but also gives me back a lot of depth and perspective. I feel the grandness of it that brings me to my knees, vulnerable and renewed. I like to create in that newly offered neutral space. How did you come to name your new album Everywhere We Looked Was Burning? It has two meanings. The most obvious is that the world has massive problems, from wars to injustice to the literal burning of the environment in so many places.  Since I have always been seen as speaking only to the Tunisian context, this is my effort to show the world that I think it is not only us who has issues. We are all way behind where we should be in terms of human cooperation, setting good priorities for the future, and respecting one another and the earth. In this sense, the burning refers to the devastation which is occurring everywhere. But it also has a second meaning, which is that humanity still has a flame in its heart, in its eyes. People everywhere, especially young people, are ardently passionate about a better future. This flame cannot be extinguished and will light the way ahead for us all. Everywhere we looked was burning, but maybe we still have a chance to save the future? I like to keep things hopeful and open to a better ending. Why did you choose to produce an album in English this time?  It is seen as a big change, but the fact is I have always been experimenting and growing so it is natural that I try something new. The album has a couple of songs in Arabic, but most of the songs are in English and it represents my effort to speak as an Arab woman to the rest of the world in terms they can understand.  I am reminded of the story of a great Palestinian leader from the old times, the late Haidar Abdel Shafi. He was set to give an important speech to a large international audience and media after an important conference. His team wrote the speech in Arabic, which of course he spoke better than anyone. He said that this time, it was very important for the world to understand what he was saying—to get the message clearly without anything being lost in translation and to hear directly from his heart. I love Arabic and still perform in the language quite a bit. But I had a moment where I, like this great man, wanted to also be understood by the world. To have the world not only use their imagination or preconception when thinking of us but to also hear from us directly in terms that can move them. I have also sung a lot in English in my beginnings, so to me, it was natural and soothing—to retrieve my first emotions and to discover and explore a new dimension in my vocals. What would be your message to the modern women of the Middle East? Be yourself. Believe in yourself, in your inner voice, your strength, your power. Be free like the wind. Be strong. Most of all, let’s be together. Watch the exclusive first look at Emel Mathlouthi’s new music video for her song M’Errouh (“From the Soul”) below. Written, composed, directed, and produced by Mathlouthi, this track from the album features beats made from the rhythmic sounds of nature including wind, water, and fire. “It is the song of the apocalypse, pointing at the horizon. The song of a tragic exodus of millions of people across the planet, escaping the fatal menace: Capitalism,” explained Mathlouthi. “Nature becomes another character in the story, that at turns transforms into a villain that’s coming after us for revenge, for all the harm we’ve been doing to it.”  00:00 / 00:00 Video View CountDo not alter this value. Validate Email Video written, directed and produced by Emel Mathlouthi 
Song written and composed by Emel Mathlouthi 
Music Production by Emel Mathlouthi Karim Attoumane and Amine Metani Read Next: The post.

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This Prada Factory Will Now Mass-Produce Medical Overalls and Masks to Meet the Rising Demands

Courtesy of Prada While the, it’s all hands on deck for many fashion houses who have turned their factories to produce these antiviral essentials. Prada is one such label that has started the production of 80,000 medical overalls and 110,000 masks which will be allocated to healthcare personnel, following a request from the Tuscany Region. Once producing show-stealing garments, the Italian luxury fashion house has been producing these necessities from March 18 until April 6 from its factory in Montone (Perugia) which has remained open amid other shut-downs for this very reason. This production plan will ensure that daily deliveries are made to meet the rising demands for masks and overalls with the help of “a network of Italian external suppliers”. Prada FW20. Photo: GoRunway.com Also Read: Earlier this month, Prada S.p.A also announced that it would be financially supporting two new ICUs in three of Milan’s hospitals— Sacco, San Raffaele, and Vittore Buzzi, amid the rising cases of coronavirus in Italy. Prada joins other brands such as Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent, and Balenciaga which are under Kering, in mass-manufacturing protective equipment for the healthcare workers who are in the front-line of defense. Fashion houses under LVMH including Dior, Fendi, and Louis Vuitton also recently announced that they have supplied several million surgical masks to France, while hydroalcoholic gels are also being produced by the factories of Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy. The shortage of these supplies is a global issue with the World Health Organization recommending the frequent cleaning and sanitation of hands as an effective way of protecting yourself from the coronavirus. Other conglomerations and large and small scale brands that are now helping in meeting these demands, and, Dolce & Gabbana, Versace, H&M, Estée Lauder, Mango, Cristian Siriano, as well as the British Fashion Council. Read Next: The post.

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The Best Fitness Trainers and Platforms to Follow for Free Workouts

Photo by Jonathan Borba on Unsplash The gyms may be closed but that doesn’t mean it’s time to stop breaking a sweat. Even if you find yourself in one-bedroom apartment those no excuse not to, your brain awake and your mind positive. @305Fitness Based in the states, the founder Sadie Kurzban and her troupe of trainers of dance-cardio studio 305 Fitness bring energetic dance-cardio workouts to. Just like a dance party, get ready to sweat. @Crank.Dubai Taking to Instagram the trainers from Crank offer up a range of different workouts to try. With two instructors taking to the mat, they give options for those who equipment or not and offer up some modifications too. @LauraBiceps Award-winning personal trainer Laura Hoggins wants you to learn how to lift. If you find yourself without weights she also has some bodyweight workouts on her Instagram too. @Shona_Vertue A yoga teacher and personal trainer Shona Vertue’s message is all about working out for the health of the body and mind. She not only focuses on training but on breathing work too. @StudioRepublik.ae   Stayed tuned on StudioRepublik’s Instagram page where they’re posting workouts and hosting a live question and answer session for those with burning fitness queries. @TheBodyCoach You may have heard that Joe Wicks has been helping parents stay sane by hosting live P.E. sessions for kids every morning, Monday to Friday. If you head over to his you can also find a whole array of workouts for everyone else including some catered to seniors. @ThePlatformDubai One of Dubai’s most loved institutions, The Platform is challenging everyone to keep moving. Head to their Instagram page where they are posting new workouts every day. @YogaLaVie For all the yogi’s and wannabe yogi’s out there, the instructors at Yoga La Vie are going live on Instagram with a whole range of different disciplines. @UnderDogBoxn With over 10 live workouts already on their Instagram page that you can follow, the guys at UnderdogBoxn gym in Dubai aren’t messing around when it comes to fitness. Read Next: The post.

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Dua Lipa and Anwar Hadid Perfect Self-Care Sunday With a Couples’ Beauty Moment

As self-isolation continues to be key in combatting the spreading of the coronavirus, engaging in engaged in the ultimate “self-care Sunday” with a joint masking session. Posing in front of a mirror at home, Lipa and Hadid showed off their matching his-and-hers face masks: Lipa applied her white-to-gray treatment all over the skin, while Hadid chose to focus in on areas below the brow line. Applying a mask is an easy way to give your skin a healthy boost. While it’s unclear which exact style Lipa and Hadid applied, it appears similar in texture to a GlamGlow Gravity Mud treatment, which focuses on firming, tightening, and lifting the skin. In addition to the many skincare benefits of masking, there’s also something therapeutic about putting it on; you’re required to spend the 10 to 20 minutes of application focusing on your own wellness. With the weeks at home to come, Lipa and Hadid prove it’s prime time to embrace that kind of “me moment”—on Sunday and beyond. Below, take a look at the couple’s cutest moments thus far: 24 November 2019. Photo: Getty 11 September 2019. Photo: Getty 9 October 2019. Photo: Getty 16 September 2019. Photo: Getty 2 October 2019. Photo: Getty 6 July 2019. Photo: Getty 1 Originally published on Read Next: The post.

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Covid-19 in the UAE: Expo 2020 Dubai Could be Delayed by a Year

According to sources, could be delayed by a whole year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Dubbed the “World’s Greatest Show,” the Expo is slated to take place from October 20 to April 10 2021, bringing together 192 countries and over 11 million overseas visitors. The decision to delay the event is being made by the Expo 2020 steering committee, comprising of officials from the UAE and foreign countries participating in the event, at a virtual meeting taking place today, March 30. While the final decision has not been declared by the member states of the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), which awards the event, it seems unlikely that it would go against the recommendation given the delay of other major events around the world. It was announced last week that in order to curb the spread of the Covid-19, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics has been postponed to July 23 to August 8, 2021. Also Read: All the Precautionary Measures Taken by UAE to Curb the COVID-19 Outbreak Nearly all countries in the world have restricted travel by closing borders and grounding flights in and out of them, leading to the cancelation of many major events. The Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, has officially canceled the upcoming men’s and couture fashion weeks scheduled to take place Paris in June. Milan’s Camera Nazionale della Moda, which oversees Italian fashion, has also postponed the men’s shows which will now take place alongside the womenswear shows in September. After the World Health Organization deemed the Novel Coronavirus a global “pandemic”, various disciplinary bodies across the UAE government began taking to ensure the safety of the local community and protect the public health of all its citizens. These measures include the suspension of flights to major destinations in countries across the world, and a nationwide disinfection program due to which the residents of the country have been urged to not leave their homes unless it is to get food, medicine or, for an emergency. Read Next: UAE Residents Can Now Get Tested for Covid-19 in Five Minutes The post.

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Exclusive: Egyptian Jewelry Designer Jude Benhalim on Getting Creative During Covid-19 Isolation

Chimera earrings blue Chimera earrings red Chimera necklace red Chimera ring red Lampadario necklace Mezza Sol earrings Mini Spirali hoop earrings Nostra Terra earrings Spirali earrings Spirali choker 1 As the future for independent brands remains at risk, it’s more important than ever to #BuyArabDesigners. Courtesy of Jude Benhalim Next month, Egyptian jewelry designer will launch her latest collection, Etruria. The young Cairo-based creative has drawn on her experiences of a vacation spent in Italy to design pieces that are reminiscent of the various symbols and motifs used by the country’s ancient Etruscan civilization. Combined with her now-signature interchangeable aesthetic and use of mixed materials including gold-plated brass and resin, there’s a simultaneously modern and historical feel to the collection. “For me, the spirals and semi-circle shapes in vibrant colors are redolent of a beautiful and carefree summer stroll,” says Benhalim. “The techniques used in hand-crafting these pieces include engravings, cut-outs and 3D circles to bring the shapes and symbols of Etruscan to life.” Courtesy of Jude Benhalim Created in 18ct gold-plated brass and sterling silver with vibrant stones in blush pink, burgundy, emerald green and sky blue, each piece feels like a small work of art – yet utterly wearable. Having launched her namesake label when she was just 17-years-old in 2011, it’s all the more impressive that a young talent has been able to develop and sustain such a mature and profitable signature. Courtesy of Jude Benhalim “The whole thing actually started as a school project – I just really enjoyed the design process and making beaded jewelry with my hands,” says Benhalim. “I was too young to understand the potential of my designs or the gaps in the market but my mother saw the potential and funded the initial capital; she’s now my partner and CEO of the business, and a main driving force behind the success of the brand.” Fashion jewelry is certainly having a moment, with runway designers placing greater emphasis on statement accessories to complement their collections, and celebrities and fashion’s ‘influencer’ models (Gigi, Bella et al) making sure the market for standout pieces remains strong – Kendall Jenner has already been spotted in a pair of Benhalim’s architectural earrings. But given the impact of Covid-19 on the industry, we have to question the resilience of independents and if they will manage to find light at the end of the tunnel? Courtesy of Jude Benhalim “I am trying to be as positive and productive as I possibly can be,” says the designer. “It is scary to think that the crisis might be prolonged…but with everything slowing down, it is giving me a chance to contemplate and reflect, both in my personal and professional life. I’m now focusing on revisiting my business model, strategies and structure, past projects and productivity. I can’t predict what will happen but what assures me is that it would be a global impact and I wouldn’t have to deal with it alone.” Bouncing back from adversity is something the fashion industry does particularly well: economic instability tends to blossom newfound creativity. And this seems true for Benhalim who shares a particularly positive outlook. “Read a book, paint, solve a puzzle, reflect, meditate – this is a beautiful chance to feed our souls and creative spirit.” The Etruria collection launches mid-April – available at JudeBenhalim.com and the Jude Benhalim showroom in New Cairo Read Next: The post.

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Can a Pillow Really Help Prevent Wrinkles?

Courtesy of Sleep&Glow We’re always looking for new ways to battle premature and unwarranted wrinkles. From facial exercises to creams and treatments, our lastest find arrives in the shape of a pillow. Not your average sleep partner, the founder of Anna Polupanova set out to create a way to banish the sleep wrinkle. She tells us more. Why did you decide to create Sleep&Glow? One day, as a heavy side sleeper I noticed vertical wrinkles on my face. I went for a new round of fillers to my cosmetologist and discovered that the vertical lines were sleep wrinkles from sleeping on my side and squishing my face every night. I also learned that fillers or Botox would not be effective against sleep wrinkles unless I would change the way I slept. Botox for example ‘freezes’ face muscles to avoid expression wrinkles. But it does nothing against skin deformation and twisting when sleeping on the side or stomach. An average female head weighs around 5kg and all that weight presses face skin against the pillow. Botox cannot stop that from happening every. The idea occurred to me – what if there would be a pillow for side-sleepers, which would minimize skin indentation and yet be comfy during sleep? The alternatives on the market were not up to my standards. Some beauty pillows were just too uncomfortable to sleep on and did not respect orthopaedic principles of correct sleep positioning. Others claimed they were ‘beauty’ pillow, but in reality, they didn’t prevent skin from deformation during sleep. There is also a big hype about silk pillowcases and their anti-aging benefits. It is true that they may help reduce skin friction against the pillowcase fabric. However, a female head weighs around 5kg and if a lady sleeps on the side or stomach no pillowcase, even the silk one, can stop gravitation and skin deformation. How does the Sleep&Glow pillow differ from your normal one? The Sleep&Glow pillow has a patented 3D shape which helps fight against sleep wrinkles and morning puffiness. It also has a neck supporting bolster to provide a healthy neck and spine alignment. All ordinary and orthopedic pillows are not designed to avoid skin deformation when sleeping on the side. Usually, orthopedic pillows do have healthy neck support, but ordinary pillows filled with down, feathers or polyester fiber don’t. Talk to us about the silhouette of the pillow? The key feature of the pillow is the side cradles into which the face should be positioned during sleep on the side. The cradles support the head in the area of the chin and forehead while keeping cheek, eye and nose skin ‘floating in the air’. This is how the skin is not deformed and twisted during sleep. Another key feature is the transition between the head positing zone and the central head cradle. Multiple customers have praised the Sleep&Glow pillow for having helped them learn how to sleep on their backs. Finally, the front bolster provides neck support for a healthy neck and spine alignment during sleep. What are sleep wrinkles? Sleep wrinkles are vertical lines caused by repetitive facial skin compression when sleeping on the side or stomach. The areas most susceptible to sleep wrinkles are the forehead and the skin around the eyes, nose, and lips. Over time, sleep wrinkles don’t disappear in the morning but can turn into permanent wrinkles. Sleep wrinkles can worsen existing expression wrinkles, as the skin affected during sleep is usually creased along existing expression lines. The around the eyes and lips is especially vulnerable to increased wrinkles caused by sleeping with a regular pillow. Sleeping on the back is the best sleep position helping to avoid sleep wrinkles, but according to the British Sleep Society, 69% of people prefer sleeping on their side. The Sleep&Glow pillow was created to help side sleepers prevent and fight sleep wrinkles. How do they differ from normal wrinkles? When we smile or frown, expression wrinkles are caused by repetitive facial muscle contraction. Expression wrinkles can be successfully corrected with injections, like Botox, or with hyaluronic, acid-based fillers. The injections either ‘freeze’ the face muscles (e.g. Botox) or fill in the ‘empty spaces’ under the wrinkled skin. These are mechanisms to treat expression wrinkles. When it comes to sleep wrinkles, skin indentation and twisting during sleep can last for hours. ‘Freezing’ face muscles won’t do much to avoid the skin deformation, while the fillers may provide a very short-term solution, if at all. Why do you advise using silk pillowcases? Silk has many unique benefits, which include not absorbing from the face, reducing hair breakage and tangling and maintaining a lower temperature than other fabrics, which is beneficial for the skin. The Sleep&Glow silk pillowcase is specially-tailored for the shape of the pillow, which is why its fabric is not stretched inside the side cradles leading to minimum skin friction against the fabric. It’s important to note that silk or satin pillowcases on their own may reduce friction between the skin and the pillow, but they cannot eliminate the pressure of a 5kg head causing skin indentation and eventually sleep wrinkles. Claims that silk or satin pillowcases fight sleep wrinkles are not true. What advice do you have for people who move around a lot in their sleep? The Sleep&Glow pillow has two face cradles for side sleeping and one head cradle for back sleeping, which allow people to toss and turn during the night and yet sleep in the right position to fight and avoid sleep wrinkles and morning puffiness. How long does it take to get used to sleeping on the Sleep&Glow pillow? Most people get used to sleeping on the Sleep&Glow pillow after a few nights. Sometimes it takes up to two weeks. Overall, 92% of customers find the pillow comfortable and effective. Read Next: The post.

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Why Fall 2020 Fashion Will be Your New Armor

Balenciaga. Photo: Vogue.com Balmain. Photo: Vogue.com Bottega Veneta Photo: Vogue.com Burberry Photo: Vogue.com Chalayan Photo: Vogue.com Chanel Photo: Vogue.com Dior Photo: Vogue.com Dolce & Gabbana Photo: Vogue.com Fendi Photo: Vogue.com Gucci Photo: Vogue.com Hermès Photo: Vogue.com Loewe Photo: Vogue.com Louis Vuitton Photo: Vogue.com Marc Jacobs Photo: Vogue.com Marques Almeida Photo: Vogue.com Miu Miu Photo: Vogue.com Richard Quinn Photo: Vogue.com Proenza Schouler Photo: Vogue.com 1 In uncertain times and moments of crisis, the desire to protect ourselves becomes an everyday reality. But so too does the need for a little escapism. With their ability to see into the future (if not quite literally then certainly via some impressively fine-tuned instincts), designers toughened up Fall 2020 collections with apocalypse-ready (read: Covid-19) fashion. Take for example’s butter-soft black leather dress paired with a Ninja headscarf and wedge-sole rubber boots; Fendi’s perfectly-cut leather coat, made all the more threatening by Bella Hadid whose efficient runway stride and assassin-like glare was straight out of Killing Eve; and not forgetting the functionality of a cowl-neck leather coat in olive-brown, the kind only Hermès can truly master. Capes (Chalayan and Loewe), second-skin ‘body armor’ (Balmain), utilitarian harnesses and buckled-up braces (Dolce & Gabbana and) form an impressive hit-list of items to weather any storm. Some, more practical than others. Take Rick Owen’s floor-sweeping sleeping bag cape in quilted astronaut silver – impractical and excessive, perhaps, but nevertheless a major addition to your fantasy-world warrior wardrobe. While bulky layers make perfect sense for those battling colder climes, there seems little point in adding extra ‘sweat’ to the rest of us. Luckily, there are enough adaptable pieces and statement accessories to tap the trend without going all-out GI Jane. Consider Dolce & Gabbana’s lace-up sock-boots and velvet spy caps;’s dashing jodhpurs to look stylish while doing it. Survival of the fittest never looked so chic. Read Next: The post.

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UAE Residents Can Now Get Tested for Covid-19 in Five Minutes

Abu Dhabi. Photo: Shutterstock In the fight against the Covid-19 disease, the UAE government has taken countless. Solely dedicated to testing people for the coronavirus, the country’s first drive-through test center is set up by Abu Dhabi Health Services Company (SEHA) and is located in Abu Dhabi’s Zayed Sports City. From 8am to 8pm daily, the center’s qualified medical staff can serve up to 600 people who can get tested in about five minutes while remaining inside their vehicles. Operating from 8am-8pm daily with 4 vehicle lanes, tests take just 5 minutes and the facility has capacity to conduct 600 tests per day. Appointments must be made before visiting by calling Istijaba Centre on 8001717 — مكتب أبوظبي الإعلامي (@admediaoffice) Those looking to get tested will first need to contact Estijaba on 8001717 to book an appointment for a pre-assessment screening. Upon answering the questions related to the patient’s condition, the pre-test will determine whether you should get tested at the mobile facility or not. At this stage, people who are considered to have contracted the virus, and the most vulnerable, such as the elderly, pregnant women or people with chronic diseases will be prioritized for the test and have it done free of cost. For those who are a part of the wider community and are getting tested for their reassurance, the procedure will cost AED 370. Individuals qualified to get tested at the drive-through center can do so at one of the center’s four lanes after registering their Emirates ID and will receive the results via SMS and the SEHA app. Today, I visited the mobile COVID-19 Test Center set up by SEHA as part of measures to contain the virus. Medical teams out in the field are the first line of protection of the UAE, their sacrifices safeguard our health. — محمد بن زايد (@MohamedBinZayed) On Saturday, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces visited the mobile test facility. “Today, I visited the mobile COVID-19 Test Center set up by SEHA as part of measures to contain the virus,” said a tweet from Sheikh Mohammed’s Twitter account. “Medical teams out in the field are the first line of protection of the UAE, their sacrifices safeguard our health.” Photos accompanying the tweet showed Sheikh Mohammad giving a nasal swab sample as the first stage of screening. Read Next: The post.

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Going Vegan? Follow This Ultimate Guide to Vegan Makeup and Skincare

Photographed by Adam Browning Hill for Vogue Arabia Now more than ever we need to look after our health and pay close attention to the ingredients we are using. While it is fairly obvious we feel better if we eat foods in their raw state without added preservatives, chemicals and toxins – the same logic applies to the skin. For years we challenged the concept; too expensive, not as effective, a shorter lifespan? It simply didn’t seem worth it. Yet with a consistently growing vegan community in the Middle East, switching to vegan skincare and makeup products not only makes sense for health benefits, but the development in quality and cost can no longer be disputed. So where do we start? Differentiating between cruelty-free and vegan can be confusing at the best of times. To break it down, cruelty-free implies that a product and its ingredients have not been tested on animals. Whereas vegan implies that the product contains no animal or animal-derived ingredients (for example Carmine, a crushed red beetle used in many red lipsticks and blush). Also make sure to look out for byproducts such as honey, lanolin, and gelatin that can be hidden in the ingredient list. Once confined to specialist stores, vegan products are now readily available both in department stores and online and brands are making a conscious effort to market them more clearly – whether through official certification or signage, so make sure to do your research depending on the products country of origin. While it’s not as difficult as it seems to switch to ethically sourced chemical-free products and commencing a vegan skincare and makeup routine, it can still be a minefield to those of us new to the movement. To guide us, celebrity and editorial make up artist recommends her top ten vegan products to edge your way in. 1. Collosol Eau de Lait  One of France’s best-kept secrets, this must-have cleansing milk is a cult classic and a favorite of the late Karl Largerfeld. It’s a half-milk and half-micellar water formula that cleanses, plumps and refreshes the skin. Best of all it doesn’t require rinsing! 2. Cosrx Hyaluronic Acid Intensive Cream As the world’s No1 Korean skincare brand, this long-lasting highly nourishing moisturizer is perfect for dehydrated skin without feeling oily or heavy, with the added bonus of being paraben-free. 3. Too Faced Born This Way Super Coverage Concealer Use this as a concealer or as a full coverage foundation is a firm favorite in my kit. Keep it dewy (in its natural state) or matte it down with translucent powder for your desired finish. 4. Anastasia Beverly Hills Dip Brow Pomade  Dip Brow Pomade is what brow dreams are made of. From a natural-looking texture to bold outlining this product can do it all. Its waterproof formula is sure to withstand the summer heat. 5. Haus Labs Le Monster Matte Lip Crayon – Mastered  Lady Gaga’s newly launched makeup brand Haus Labs proudly adds itself to the list of 100% Vegan brands. This red matte lip crayon is a must-have if you are after a fiercely modern red. 6. KVD Vegan Beauty Tattoo Liner – Trooper KVD Vegan Beauty’s award-winning bestseller Tattoo Liner in the color Trooper dries faster than you can blink. With a high pigment, long wear and smudge-resistant formula our eyeliner dreams have come true. 7. Hourglass Ambient Lighting Blush Quad – Ghost Known as a cruelty-free brand their range now includes a selection of excellent Vegan products. This blusher leaves a beautifull natural finish. 8. Farsali Unicorn Essence Antioxidant Primer Serum Farsali’s products are both vegan and cruelty-free and contain no sulfates, phthalates or parabens – all preservatives that can be very harmful to the skin. Here, is a primer that doesn’t just prolong the wear of your makeup but is full of superfruit extracts loaded with anti-aging antioxidants as well as Vitamin C to even out the skin tone. 9. Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Beauty Light Wand When it comes to highlighting this product trumps all. It comes in four colors to suit all skin tones. It glides on as a creamy liquid highlighter and dries to a long-lasting finish evening out the pores through its pearlized formula. 10. Sand & Sky Australian Pink Clay Porefining Face Mask This 100% vegan and cruelty-free face mask is made from botanical ingredients. Pink Clay absorbs impurities and reduces the appearance of pores and pigmentation. Detoxify and refine the vegan way. Read Next: The post.

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