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This is When Saudi Arabia’s First International Film Festival Will Take Place

Nadine Labaki in 1982. The inaugural edition of Saudi Arabia’s is all set to take off in November 2021.  After a delay due to Covid-19 restrictions, the ambitious event is back on track to take place at Jeddah’s Old Town, a UNESCO world heritage site, between November 11 to November 20. Under the theme of “Metamorphosis,” the festival celebrates cinema as a force for positive change. “It reflects on the festival’s local context: the impact of cinema’s triumphant return to Saudi Arabia since 2019, as well as the blossoming local and regional film scenes, exploring how cinema culture can create an interface connecting a new, outward-looking Saudi and the world,” reads a statement from the festival. The first edition of the festival will look at how cinema has successfully adapted from being analog to digital, to new platforms delivering content, and the changing role of women in cinema. The event will also shed light on emerging talents from Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Arab world. The festival comes after the opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia after the removal of a ban lasting nearly four years. 40 Years and One Night by Saudi Arabian director Mohammed Alholayyil, 1982 by Oualid Mouaness, and A Son by Mehdi M. Barsaoui are some of the few films showing at the Red Sea International Film Festival this year. The plot of 40 Years and One Night follows five siblings and their children celebrating Eid al-Fitr at their family home. The happiness and joy come to a halt when the family receives an unfortunate phone call and what follows is chaos. Through the course of a single night, relationships are re-cast, and the past is rewritten.  1982, the first feature film by Mouaness, explores the Lebanese civil war through 11-year-old Wissam’s life. The film explores themes of love and fear while not being nostalgic or naive. The film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, where the film received the NETPAC Award and was also chosen as Lebanon’s official submission to the Oscars. A Son by Barsaoui follows a loving family where everything is at ease. The couple’s married life is bliss; the couple is happy at work, at home and even shares a close-knit relationship with their son. However, all those moments change in an instant when the family is caught in a random ambush. Secrets are exposed when their lives begin to unravel. Since its premiere at the Venice International Film Festival, the film won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor and was nominated for best film. The film also received tons of nominations and awards, including the Young Talent Award at the Hamburg Film Festival and several awards at the Cairo International Film Festival. Heading the Red Sea International Film Festival are managing director Shivani Pandya and director of Arab programs and film classics Antoine Khalife. The two formerly worked at the Dubai International Film Festival. Kaleem Aftab, a film critic, joined as director of international programming while Jumana Zahid leads the, an incubator for local filmmakers. The festival looks to bring together film lovers, filmmakers, and the global film industry to celebrate cinema in the Kingdom. Several international guests were to grace the festival, which was initially supposed to take place in March last year. However, it is now unclear how many international stars will attend the festival due to current international travel restrictions. Read Next: These Six Films By Arab Filmmakers are Screening at Berlinale This Year The post.

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March Horoscopes: All the Exciting Things to Look Forward to This Month

Artwork by Rohan Hande As life comes a full circle – or a full 365 days – since the beginning of the pandemic, we can’t help but retrospect on the year gone by and brace ourselves for what’s to come ahead. This year promises a lot of different things to the different signs on the zodiac. From personal and professional growth to new beginnings in relationships and starting afresh, read on to see what’s in store for you this month. Aries On Wednesday, March 3, your ruling planet Mars enters Gemini, opening up a whole new, yet feisty communication channel. Use this time to air out any pent up feelings and emotions with your loved ones to avoid resentments to build up later on. Cosmic tip: Communicate responsibly. Taurus A new moon in Pisces on March 13 is all about getting in touch with your inner circle. You might find yourself starting a creative project with like minded people — it’ll be your pride and joy. Cosmic tip: Use the new moon to get in touch with what you really want. Gemini Cosmic blessings and abundance to come your way this March as Mercury enters Pisces on March 15, opening up new and exciting opportunities in your personal and professional life. Cosmic tip: Keep being positive as rewards are coming your way.  Cancer The new moon in Pisces on Saturday, March 13 calls into question some of your long-standing beliefs and thought processes that may no longer be serving you. It may be time to try to make a change for the better. Cosmic tip: It’s okay to shed old skin and start fresh. Leo A new moon, marking new beginnings, takes place on Saturday, March 13, in Pisces, singling a deep transformation in your personal life. Whether it’s strengthening a relationship or starting a business venture with a friend, you’re ready for it. Cosmic tip: Personal growth is coming your way, embrace it. Virgo On Wednesday, March 3, the fighter planet Mars enters Gemini, corresponding with your solitary sign and making you step into the spotlight. This will be a great time to reach out and make new friends and work on previously long-shelved projects. Cosmic tip: This month is about getting out of your shell and enjoying the attention. Libra Venus, your ruling planet, moves to the top of your chart on March 7, signalling a key professional reward through April 6 – but you must rise up to the occasion and be open to having a conversation with your superiors. Cosmic tip: You won’t get what you want until you ask for it. Scorpio A new moon in Pisces on March 13 indicates a new phase in your social status. You will suddenly find yourself being invited to new and exciting social gatherings and initiatives that will help you get out of your comfort zone and evolve. Cosmic tip: You will continue to learn and grow – in unexpected places. Sagittarius As fighter planet Mars enters Gemini on Wednesday, March 3, it marks the beginning of sudden transformations in your personal space. From rekindling old relationships to striking new friendships, there is a new beginning on the cards for you this month. Cosmic tip: Stop and notice all the love around you. Capricorn There’s good news for relationships this month as your love life becomes extra harmonious after March 7. Venus moves into your partnership sector, bringing a stretch of peace and tenderness to your relationship through April 6. Cosmic tip: You’re looking for bliss, and bliss you shall eventually find. Aquarius A full moon in Libra on March 28 will have you rethinking your past experiences and better yourself going forward. Full moons are a powerful time for manifestations and ask you to act on lessons learned. Cosmic tip: Follow your heart and let it take you on your true journey. Pisces When fighter planet Mars enters Gemini on March 3, your home life gets a new lease of life. Turn on your favourite music, do up your space and enjoy some downtime. Cosmic tip: Take a moment to pause and try out some positive procrastination. Read Next: All 27 ‘Vogue Creativity Issue’ Covers, As They Land The post.

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Barack and Michelle Obama to Produce a Ramadan Podcast Featuring Muslim Voices

Barack and Michelle Obama. Instagram/@michelleobama Barack and. Tell Them, I Am is set to launch on April 12, with a new episode being released every weekday during the month of, novelist G Willow Wilson, and comedian Maz Jobrani. Misha Euceph. Photo: Courtesy of Spotify “The stories are universal and the guests are all Muslim,” shared Euceph during the Stream On event. “The ultimate goal is for people to feel something for them and to fall in love with the people that they are listening to without ever thinking about who they are and what they look like.” In addition to hosting the podcast, Euceph is an executive producer on Tell Them, I Am, as well as an executive producer on the former US president’s podcast with Bruce Springsteen titled Renegades: Born in the USA and the former first lady’s podcast titled The Michelle Obama Podcast. Obama’s and Springsteen’s podcast talks about masculinity, race, fatherhood, and their professional and personal journeys. The podcast is an eight-episode series, and the first two episodes are already available to stream on Spotify. In contrast, the latter features the former first lady diving into hard-hitting conversations with loved ones, colleagues, and friends. In addition to these, Spotify also announced a string of other podcasts. American filmmaker Ava DuVernay will focus on George Floyd’s death at the hands of a US police officer in May 2020 in a yet-to-be-titled investigative series. Each episode will focus on different aspects of the case and its societal repercussions. Similarly, Spotify has also partnered with Warner Bros and DC comics on a podcast about superheroes and villains. Read Next: Michelle Obama is Hosting a Brand-New Relationship Podcast The post.

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Celebrity Makeup Artist Hindash is Launching His Own Beauty Brand

Hindash. Photo: Instagram/@hindash Celebrity makeup artist is launching his very own beauty brand. The Dubai-based Jordanian beauty guru took to social media to announce his namesake beauty brand, “Hindash Cosmetics,” which is set to release in March 2021. However, there’s still an air of suspense surrounding the details of his brand’s products. “Years in manifestation, I can now finally share the birth of my brand. Are you ready for an internal beauty intervention?” The makeup artist wrote in an post. The 31-year-old artist started his beauty journey on YouTube and eventually launched his beauty account on Instagram in 2015, becoming the first male makeup artist in the GCC to do so. His flawless makeup looks were quick to garner attention, earning him the 1.1 million Instagram followers he has today, along with 68 million views and over 1.7 million subscribers on YouTube at the time of writing. While the makeup artist will be one of the many notable figures to venture into producing a beauty line this past year, it is not his first stint with creating a beauty product. Hindash is known to have collaborated with MAC cosmetics for “Mac Makers” and got to make his very own lipstick, which quickly sold out, and has also teamed up with Wow by Wojooh (now Faces Beauty) to create a high-precision eyeliner. Over the years, Hindash has earned a reputation for working with renowned celebrities worldwide, including supermodel Naomi Campbell, actor Lindsay Lohan, model Chanel Iman, and, to name a few. Stay tuned for updates as we find out what Hindash has in the works for his fans and beauty-lovers. Read Next: Here’s How You Can Donate Your Beauty Products to Women in Need in the UAE The post.

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Inside Our Fourth Anniversary Issue Celebrating Arabia’s Creative Visionaries

Athiec Geng for Vogue Arabia’s fourth anniversary issue photographed by Mous Lamrabat This March, all 27 editions of Vogue worldwide are dedicating their to creativity and fashion’s artistic spirit. For Vogue Arabia, celebrating in this month its 4th anniversary, the theme takes a truly local angle, with an issue fully dedicated to the best creative talents coming from the Middle East and North Africa. Athiec Geng photographed by Mous Lamrabat The conceptual covers are shot by Moroccan photographer. They offer a message of optimism in a world that is facing so many challenges. Shot in Marrakech, the images by Lamrabat invite the viewer inside his singular universe; one that challenges modern misconceptions of beauty, and explores creativity within the world of the absurd and the surreal. With an often lighthearted undertone to his work, Lamrabat showcases an element of simplicity that portrays a real image of the region, telling journalist Myrna Ayad, “I want to show you where I’m from, not the way it’s shown in brochures.” The creative admits to being a bit of a hoarder – not only of props, but also ideas. For one of the cover images, he stacked an assembly of red fez hats first seen on the wall of a Marrakech riad atop the model’s head, before attaching a large red silk heart on her torso from a stash of props bought from Antwerp. Farrah El Dibany photographed by Sherif Mokhtar “At a time when the world is experiencing so many challenges, the joys of witnessing the genius of a fashion designer, artist, chef, or a performer, can drive us, more than ever, to a place of bliss, even if for a brief instant,” says Manuel Arnaut, Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief. “It is regrettable that historically, the work of creatives has been undervalued on so many occasions. I cannot help but think of my colleagues in the creative fields as unsung heroes, so many times working under harsh conditions, but bringing beauty, depth, and color to the world we live in.” Schiaparelli spring 2021 couture. Photographed by Julien Vallon By shining a spotlight on talent from a cross-section in the Middle East that has shaped fashion, arts, and design, the March issue brings to life the thriving and dynamic community in the region and showcases Vogue Arabia’s mission to support them. Some of the creatives included are Alia Bin Omair, Mahira Abdelaziz, and Yasmine Yeya, along with Rym Saidi and Zeinab Alhashemi. The March anniversary issue also highlights a range of topics surrounding art and what creativity means today. From personal and powerful photo essays of a new generation of fearless young MENA talent shot in New York by Tunisian female photographer Oumayma Ben Tanfous, to a peek behind-the-scenes at surrealist fashion house Schiaparelli with an interview with its creative director Daniel Roseberry, this issue celebrates creativity in all its forms. Of course, March also showcases the latest high jewelry, SS21 collections, and the new abaya styles. Shanina Shaik and Hilary Rhoda photographed by Greg Swales In beauty, the SS21 trend report spotlights the most striking runway looks and how to achieve them, and makeup artist Niki M’nray pays tribute to iconic Middle Eastern female artists—from Safeya Binzagr to Monir Shahroudy—with an inventive interpretation of their work on models Shanina Shaik and Hilary Rhoda. In another striking tribute, celebrity hairstylist Nabil Harlow reimagines the decadence of the 1940s and 50s with his celebration of the golden age of Egyptian cinema. The issue also features Mohamed Abdelhamid, one of Egypt’s most successful SFX makeup artists—the favorite of stars such as Samia Gamal, Asmahan, Dalida—about some of the Arab world’s most important hair and makeup talents. Photography: The Bardos Creativity also comes with a twist of humor in this issue, spotlighting the famous Egyptian satirical figure Abla Fahita, who will star in the upcoming Netflix series Drama Queen, with her own couture created by some of the Arab world’s most exciting designers who created looks just for this shoot. March 8 is also when International Women’s Day is commemorated, and in this issue inspiring women from the region share their wisdom and insights. HE Ahood Al Zaabi, director of the United Nations Department at the UAE’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, writes exclusively for Vogue Arabia about gender equality and how the role of women in society must be reassessed, while Arwa Damon, senior international correspondent at CNN, speaks candidly about a topic all women will face at some point in their lives—menopause. Designer Nora Al Shaikh and muse Lulwah Al-Homoud Photo: Taha Baageel All this and more inspiring features, exclusive interviews, and groundbreaking fashion shoots, only in the March 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia. Read Next: All 27 ‘Vogue Creativity Issue’ Covers, As They Land The post.

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What Makes a Food Go Viral? Inside the Explosive Popularity of TikTok’s Feta Pasta

Jenni Häyrinen’s feta pasta.Photo: Courtesy of Jenni Häyrinen/@liemessa During the second week of February, Instacart started to notice something strange. Sales for block feta had skyrocketed 117%, and the cheese was now the top-trending search term on its website. Cherry tomatoes and basil were not far behind. What on earth, the company wondered, was causing this random spike? Meanwhile, US supermarkets from Charlotte, North Carolina, to Jersey City to Sydney couldn’t keep the salty Greek cheese in stock. Harris Teeter, a popular southern grocery chain, said demand for feta was up across its 230 locations. On social media, users spewed frustration about empty shelves at Whole Foods. If you’re under, say, 30, you know exactly what was the cause behind all of this: the TikTok pasta. Oh, yes. The ooey-gooey dish—roughly composed of whole cherry tomatoes, a short noodle, garlic, basil, and a big ol’ block of cheese—has been blasted all over the For You pages of millennials and Gen Z’ers for weeks now. As of March 1, #fetapasta has more than 661.7 million views on TikTok. The similar yet more specific #bakedfetapasta has more than 86.7 million. Between the two hashtags, there are more than 45,000 videos of the feta pasta circulating around the app’s ether. It has evolved forms too: There’s now also vegan feta pasta. A feta pasta with shrimp. A feta pasta that doesn’t use feta at all but Boursin yet is still widely considered part of the feta-pasta canon despite not having any feta. that has more than 15 million views and counting. It feels like everyone is making the pasta—because, well, millions of people really are making the pasta. Brand consultant Zach Weiss was in bed, scrolling through TikTok, when he saw a #fetapasta video for the umpteenth time. “It got to the point of saturation where I just had to try it out of curiosity,” he says. “The visual just draws you in—the top-down shot of this big brick of oven-melted cheese and colorful tomatoes.” He saved it to his Favorites page. The next day, Weiss went to his local grocery store and headed towards the dairy aisle. There were only two containers of feta left. That evening, he and a few friends whipped up the pasta for dinner. A friend posted it on her Instagram story, and they dug in. It was what they expected: easy to make and gluttonous. Like for Weiss, it took several viewings of several different videos for McArthur Joseph to finally fall into the pasta’s cheesy clutches. On February 9, after a Zoom-packed day at work, he made it for dinner. “There’s something so visceral and visually intriguing about squishing cheese and cherry tomatoes in a pulp, and instead of a mess, there’s a product you can have for dinner,” he says. “To me, it breaks down into a couple of things: (1) an easy recipe, (2) inexpensive/accessible ingredients, and (3) instructions that feel like an art-and-crafts project.” Joseph, a senior social-media manager for digital marketing agency, also found the feta-pasta content on his feed rather refreshing. Sure, there were some stylized versions from full-time food bloggers. But many of the videos he scrolled past were by amateurs, cooking it up in a normal kitchen with Pyrex baking dishes. “TikTok, at its core, feels like the most democratized platform right now. You don’t have to have a million followers for your content to go viral. There’s also way less pretense on that platform and more room for creativity, whereas on Instagram it feels like every influencer/brand is trying their best to beat the algorithm,” he says. (Joseph is onto something. A TikTok spokesperson told Vogue that they believe the pasta’s power lies in its unpretentiousness: “It’s a trend that is easy to enjoy and take part in.” Quoting another TikTok icon from Ratatouille, Chef Gusteau, they added, “Anyone can cook.”) Weiss and Joseph can’t remember what video, exactly, they made the pasta from, but there’s a good chance it was from Yumna Jaward, or on January 28. Since then, it’s racked up a staggering 11.2 million views. Jaward has gone viral plenty of times. But nothing, she says, compares to the feta pasta’s reaction: “The views, likes, and comments are always a huge indicator that something is going viral, but this one felt different than everything else that had gone viral before because of the number of people remaking the recipe,” she says. “In my eight years of food blogging, I’ve never seen one recipe remade as much in such a short amount of time.” A day later, on January 29, Australian blogger outpaced her predecessors’ with more than 12.7 million views and is TikTok’s most-watched feta-pasta instructional (but not video overall—that honor goes to the ASMR version, which has more than 15 million views). Baked Feta Pasta is def worth all the hype!! Inspired by the lovely @feelgoodfoodie Whereas @cookingwithayen credits Jaward, Jaward gives a nod to another food blogger in her caption: MacKenzie Smith, or, posted on January 28, has around three million views. So, if you’re looking for TikTok zero in the global feta-pasta phenomenon, it’s Smith’s. She first posted the recipe to her blog in 2019. “It was pretty popular,” she says, “but it only really took off at the beginning of quarantine.” Soon enough, it was her most-viewed blog post. So when Smith joined TikTok in January 2021, doing a feta-pasta video was a no-brainer. Within 24 hours, it had a million views. Over the next few days, Smith’s 200 followers turned into 40,000. However, despite her social-media mastery, Smith isn’t the original creator of the pasta. If you look at her video, she tags two Finnish food bloggers:, or Tiiu Puranen. Two years ago, in the midst of a brutal Finnish winter, Häyrinen was hungry. She craved some cozy baked feta, but a straight block of cheese wasn’t exactly a balanced meal. So she added some tomatoes, made it into a pasta sauce, and mixed in some noodles. Afterward, Häyrinen posted her creation to her blog and her Instagram with the hashtag #uunifetapasta. “Right away it started to go viral,” she says. “Within a few weeks, everyone in Finland was cooking it.” (That’s only a slight exaggeration—Häyrinen says the original blog post got more than three million views. Finland’s population is 5.5 million.) Unifetapasta was not without its creator controversy. The recipe was similar to a spaghetti made in 2018 by Puranen, who maintains hers is the original feta-pasta recipe (hence the dual tag in @grilledcheesesocial’s posts). Smith found out about the #uunifetapasta from a Finnish friend—and, after some translation help, posted it to her own blog in June 2019 while linking back to Häyrinen’s. How does Häyrinen feel about her creation going crazy again two years later—but this time not from her own account? “I feel like I do get credit, although not all the time,” she says. But she realizes how the origins of a thing can get lost when it’s shared and reshared millions of times. “I understand if people see the recipe on TikTok, they tag the person they are following.” Häyrinen joined TikTok herself on January 31, after she heard the pasta was going viral in the States. She uploaded her own version, hoping to capitalize on the buzz—“the original viral #uunifetapasta,” the caption reads. only around 900,000 views. The feta pasta, it seems, had already reached the end of its social-media minute. Baked feta pasta – the original viral That’s the tricky thing about TikTok. It’s an app that thrives on trends: not just starting them but joining them. Everyone does the same dance, spoofs the same song, stitches the same clip—What’s a video that lives in your head rent free? And that’s precisely what makes it so fun; it can feel like a giant inside joke you’re in on (which is saying something because most social media makes us feel like shit). But as ideas amplify, sometimes their origins fall into anonymity—even if creators do their best to tag the original maker. When there are thousands of spin-off videos floating around, it can be hard to find which one was the exact For You page powder keg. (Taylor Lorenz of The New York Times notably explored this concept when Jalaiah Harmon, the 14-year-old creator of TikTok’s famous Renegade dance, who was overshadowed by the trend’s more high-profile performers.) Häyrinen has accepted that her #uunifetapasta is now the #fetapasta. “The phenomenon has grown so big that it’s out of my hands, really,” she says. But, if you scroll past the #fetapasta and decide to make it for yourself, she does have one request. “The most common version is pretty close to the original but is missing chili. I think some chili makes a difference, and I recommend to use it.” And, if you’re interested—here’s Häyrinen’s Read Next: Vogue.me Investigates: Are You a Food Racist? Originally published on The post.

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Gigi Hadid Goes Down Memory Lane with a Series of Never-Before-Seen Pictures

Photo: Instagram/@gigihadid Gigi Hadid sure loves to take a stroll down memory lane from time to time. Over the weekend, the Palestinian-American model reminisced on her life while she was pregnant with her and Zayn Malik’s daughter by sharing unseen pictures with fans. While Hadid’s baby was taking a nap, the model decided on having a small session of “post a picture from this date” with her followers. The 25-year-old took to Instagram to share never-before-seen photos from her pregnancy and gave fans a sneak peek into her off-duty life. In one of the images, the model showed fans how she transformed half of her office into a playroom for her daughter. The cozy baby pink area featured a tent with stuffed animals, toys, and a ball pit for her four-month-old baby to play with. The new mother also shared pictures of her baby bump and the colors she was picking out for her baby’s nursery. Photo: Instagram/@gigihadid Hadid also shared photos of her pregnancy cravings that she revealed on Twitter last month. The picture showed Hadid’s boyfriend,, pouring sauce over a rack of ribs with the caption “ribz – a big pregnancy craving.” Other posts included pictures of her daughter in a personalized puffer onesie that spells her name on the back. Hadid revealed that the onesie was a gift from her Tommy Hilfiger family. The model concluded the interaction with her fans by posting a picture of her daughter’s hands, indicating that the baby had woken up from her nap. Khai Malik. Photo: Instagram/@gigihadid This isn’t the first time Hadid has shared glimpses of her life through never-before-seen images. Just last week, the model and her boyfriend celebrated their, and to mark the occasion, Hadid posted images of themselves which included one of Malik taking their daughter on a stroll. Read Next: Gigi Hadid Just Played a New Fashion Video Game as Herself The post.

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Becca Cosmetics is Going Out of Business

Courtesy of Becca Cosmetics The pandemic made the last year a precarious one for many industries, beauty included. While some sectors understandably suffered, others thrived. Salons and spas were, while others had no choice but to go out of business. We just never thought beloved Becca Cosmetics would be one of them. On Wednesday, February 24, posted a message to its Instagram grid, reading, “An important message to our Becca Beauties: Glowing with Gratitude.” The graphical text went on: “You’re all our Becca family — part of this beautiful community that supports us and shares our values. It’s because of our love for each of you that we are sharing with you now some very important news about the closing of our brand in September 2021.” The caption provided more details: “The global pandemic has had an impact on everyone around the world on many levels. It has also had a tremendous impact on so many businesses. At Becca, an accumulation of challenges, together with the global impact of COVID-19, has sadly been more than our business can withstand, and we have had to make the heartbreaking decision to close down the Becca brand at the end of September 2021.” Despite the sad news, the caption goes on with an uplifting tone. “We believe in you, and we believe that the beauty inside you is the light you share with the world. We are confident that the spirit of Becca will continue to live on through all of you. Please keep illuminating your true selves. Light your own paths and push your limits. Share positivity and light the way for others as you make an impact on this world. Own your light on your own terms.” Throughout social media, fans of the brand responded with shock and dismay. “Nooooo! My journey with Becca started with champagne pop and have never looked back Becca you will be missed but never forgotten ,” one commenter wrote on Instagram, while another said, “I’m so sorry to hear this your highlighters inspired me so much and really began an exciting era in makeup. Becca will be missed.” On Twitter, is closing! So many of us used the champagne pop highlighter as a personality trait! Who are we without it?” It’s true: Champagne Pop is an iconic highlighter, winning an Allure in the US. But even though the brand is best known for its industry-influencing highlighters, it was also an amazing source of foundation, lipstick, and so much more. Allure reached out to Becca Cosmetics and a representative for the brand shared the following: “For 20 years, we’ve built incredible connections with our communities — consumers, makeup artists, our wonderful network of influencers, and our amazing brand collaborators and brand ambassadors from yesterday and today. We’ve done meaningful work together supporting mental wellness and will continue to do so through our commitment to The Trevor Project this coming June. Together, we have put our best light out into the world, and for that, we are forever grateful.” Luckily, we still have a few months with Becca Cosmetics. In the meantime, you may want to consider stocking up on some of your favorites while they’re still available. We know we will be. Read Next: Kris Jenner Might Be Launching a Beauty Brand Originally published on The post.

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A First Look At ‘Oprah With Meghan & Harry’

Photo: Getty Hot on the heels of comes a first glimpse of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wildly anticipated interview with Oprah Winfrey, which will air on CBS in the US on March 7. For royal-watchers surprised by the Prince’s candor on his open-top bus tour of LA with Corden – during which he shared Archie’s first word (“crocodile”); revealed what the Queen bought her great-grandson for Christmas (a waffle maker); and mooted Damian Lewis as a potential Prince Harry in future seasons of The Crown – the trailer suggests it was nothing compared to the ground that will be covered in Winfrey’s sit-down with the couple. “Were you silent, or were you silenced?” Winfrey asks Meghan, who is dressed in a black Armani wrap dress with embroidered flower detail, at the start of the clip. It then cuts to the presenter clarifying that “no subject is off-limits”. Oprah mentions the phrase “almost unsurvivable” – the words the Duchess memorably used to and online abuse last October. Prince Harry also tells the presenter, “My biggest concern was history repeating itself” – an apparent allusion to the role he believes the media played in the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales. The release of the trailer comes after it was confirmed the Duke and Duchess, who announced they are from the Firm and pursue financial independence at the start of last year. Buckingham Palace released a statement on 19 February confirming that the honorary military appointments and royal patronages held by the Duke and Duchess would be returned to the Queen and redistributed among working members of the royal family. In light of the news, the Duke and Duchess released their own statement, highlighting their continued dedication to philanthropic endeavors regardless of their status within the royal family. “As evidenced by their work over the past year, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex remain committed to their duty and service to the UK and around the world, and have offered their continued support to organizations they have represented regardless of official role. We can all live a life of service. Service is universal.” Read Next: The Deeper Meaning of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Pregnancy Announcement Originally published on The post.

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Editor’s Letter: Why Our March and Fourth Anniversary Issue Celebrates Creativity

Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic This March, all the editors of Vogue worldwide agreed that such an important month in the fashion calendar should be used to highlight and celebrate in. At a time when the world is experiencing so many challenges, the joys of witnessing the genius of a fashion designer, artist, chef, or performer, can drive us, more than ever, to a place of bliss, even if only for a brief instant. At home, closing your eyes to the rhythm of your favorite song can transport you far, far away. And what about dressing up and feeling beautiful even if you are staying in? Instant gratification. It is regrettable that historically, the work of creatives has been undervalued on so many occasions. Look at Vincent van Gogh, for instance, who died in poverty and with one fewer ear, being only celebrated after his passing. With regards to fashion, during my professional life I have lost count of how many times I have heard the comment, “Come on, it’s only clothes, you are not saving lives.” Naturally, I’m aware that there are other activities and jobs of equal or greater importance, and yet, I cannot help but think of my colleagues in the creative fields as unsung heroes, so many times working under harsh conditions, but bringing beauty, depth, and color to the world we live in. Models Patrice K and Athiec Geng photographed by Mous Lamrabat, wearing Studio Mousmous This March also marks the fourth anniversary of Vogue in Arabia. This made me think that while creativity is not limited to any region, it makes sense to focus our issue on the artistry in our territory. Let’s start with our covers: shot in Marrakech by up-and-coming Moroccan talent, these images are perhaps less glossy than what we usually prioritize, but there is something so optimistic and deep about the shots, that most of the team – not all, since creativity should also be divisive – jumped with excitement when I shared the first draft. As you turn each page of this issue, I hope you will feel proud and curious about the stories of success we are shining a spotlight on, from the Egyptian opera singer enchanting the world to a female director at the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation explaining why Emirati women have a world of opportunities ahead, or our portfolio with the young creative Arab community making waves in New York, shot by Tunisian female photographer. After a year that had so many bumps in the road, I would like to end this letter by thanking the entire team involved in the making of Vogue Arabia, from the people in the office and our external contributors, to our advertisers who supported us even when their businesses were suffering, and, of course, our readers. You are the ultimate reason why we put so many hours of hard work into all we do. This is your magazine, so happy birthday to you, too. Read Next: Originally published in the March 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia The post.

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Kris Jenner Might Be Launching a Beauty Brand

According to new legal filings, Jenner has requested trademarks for her own beauty brand. And while countless other celebrities have created their own products or brands in the past year, hers is practically guaranteed to succeed regardless. Kris Jenner. Getty Images Break out the banners, cake, and candles, because another celebrity beauty brand might have just been born. Following in her daughters’ footsteps, Kardashian matriarch Kris Jenner appears to be preparing a beauty brand launch for the ages. that Jenner filed paperwork to obtain trademarks for “Kris Jenner Beauty,” “Kris Jenner Skin,” and “Kris Jenner Skin Care” on February 10, according to documents filed at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. She has yet to publicly confirm or comment on the project, but the trademark documents reportedly cover a wide breadth of potential products including but not limited to skin care, fragrance, hair care, nail care, and other cosmetics — the possibilities at this point are essentially limitless. The market for celebrity beauty brands has been expanding at the speed of light recently. The past two months alone have seen brand rumors, announcements, or launches from, and Jonathan Van Ness. Whew. With that much competition, it feels like a tricky time to be launching a beauty brand… love her or hate her, though, we all know better than to underestimate Kris Jenner. As of this post’s publish date, Jenner has accumulated over 39 million followers (and that’s just on Instagram). Plus, she’s no stranger to the world of beauty product development, thanks to her numerous collaborations with Kylie Cosmetics, KKW Beauty, and KKW Fragrance. One glance at her social media accounts proves she’s got the power of promotion, but she almost always uses it in support of her daughters. Considering what could happen when she uses that marketing know-how for her own advancement, it’s hard to imagine her potential brand doing anything but succeeding. Sadly, there’s not much else to say at this point unless Jenner decides to publicly confirm or deny the news in some way. In the meantime, we’ll be stalking social media for any reputable-looking @krisjennerbeauty or @krisjennerskin accounts. Read Next: Celebrity Makeup Artist Hindash is Launching His Own Beauty Brand Originally published on The post.

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Margaret Zhang is the New Editor-in-Chief of Vogue China

With a minimal yet eclectic style, an unmistakable presence on the front rows and 1.1 million followers on Instagram, Zhang is a fashion force to be reckoned with. And at 27 years old, the Australian-born, Chinese multi-hyphenate is one of the youngest EICs at Vogue. Margaret Zhang. Photo: Supplied Margaret Zhang, the Australian-born Chinese fashion multi-hyphenate, is the new editor-in-chief of Vogue China. At 27, she’s one of the youngest EICs at Vogue. Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief and global editorial director, Vogue, and global chief content officer, Condé Nast, says: “I am so delighted that Margaret is our new editor-in-chief of Vogue China. Her international experience, exceptional multi-platform digital expertise and wide-ranging interests are the perfect combination to lead Vogue China into the future.” Li Li, managing director of Condé Nast China, adds: “Margaret understands the emerging trends of a new generation of Chinese and possesses the business acumen needed to leverage our data and insights across new digital platforms. We welcome her creativity and innovation in defining new media approaches and look forward to her bringing global fashion to China while taking Chinese culture to the rest of the world.” Zhang is an unmistakable presence on the front row of fashion shows and a favourite of street-style photographers, with brightly dyed hair (it’s currently a vivid shade of blue), a minimal yet eclectic sense of style, and a massive 1.1 million audience. Her bio lists her as a film director — she’s written a screenplay titled Number 65 about Chinese mother/daughter dynamics that she’s working on making — but she’s also logged time as a creative director, photographer, stylist, writer and sometime model. In 2016, she produced two digital covers for the launch issue of, appearing on both of them. Additionally, Zhang is the co-founder of Background, a global consultancy company that has worked with companies from Airbnb to YouTube and fashion labels Moncler and Mulberry, where she specialises in bridging western and Chinese cultures. She replaces Angelica Cheung, the founding editor-in-chief of Vogue China, whose 16-year tenure at the magazine coincided with the rise of luxury fashion in the country. Zhang’s appointment marks a generational change and a strategic one. Having launched her blog at 16 in 2009, she’s a digital native, not unlike the young people she’ll be charged with turning into Vogue followers. Margaret Zhang. Photo: Supplied “Vogue has such a legacy, with over 125 years — in the States, at least — of significant cultural gravity,” says Zhang. “This new role is an incredible opportunity to combine my background, my skills and my interests.” The new editor-in-chief currently resides in Sydney, where she grew up, but spent the past half-decade based in New York, travelling to China every six weeks or so. She plans to relocate to Beijing, as soon as the pandemic allows. Zhang sees her new responsibilities as both outward- and inward-facing, and she believes her international experience positions her well to achieve them. “There’s a lot of context about China that is lost; often it’s looked at as this one monolithic entity, as opposed to a country of individuals and innovations,” she says. “I think Vogue China has an immense platform to communicate about those individuals not only to the world but to its own citizens. There’s a huge opportunity to champion local talent — in film, music, and the fine arts, in addition to fashion — and bring it to a global stage because it’s such a recognisable brand and so trusted.” Zhang’s parents relocated to Australia from Huangyan, a town in China’s Zhejiang province. Her father was a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Sydney. She came to fashion through her passion for ballet. (She’s also a classically trained pianist.) “I was very fortunate that my brother and I had quite a holistic upbringing and my parents were super supportive. We both grew up studying dance and that’s where the fashion interest comes from.” Using the gift cards she received with her seventh-grade academic achievement awards, Zhang went to her local Borders bookstore and stocked up on international Vogues. The December 2005 issue with Nicole Kidman on the cover was her first encounter with Vogue China. Though her hair colour has changed often, Zhang’s fashion sensibility is quite constant. At the shows, she’s usually in tailoring; despite her street-style icon status, she’s more likely to wear a T-shirt and trousers than a head-to-toe look. She launched her blog Shine by Three at 16 in 2009 as a repository for personal musings and what Zhang lovingly calls “an image dump of visual stimuli.” Today, her eponymous website mixes her professional and personal pursuits. In the early days of Covid-19 last year, Zhang live-streamed a video in which she made the family’s dumpling recipe; it benefited charity. “I’m kind of slowly working my way through my mother’s entire repertoire of traditional Chinese food,” she says. “She is just the most extraordinary cook. I have much to learn.” Zhang has been playing tennis twice a week since her return to Sydney last year. She has a female Kung Fu sifu in New York and a Muay Thai trainer in Shanghai. Looking back at the early days of her blog, she says, “I was in the right place at the right time,” acknowledging that it was equally the fact of her youth and her status as a person of colour that caught people’s attention in Australia. She began working almost right away, not waiting to finish her studies. At the University of Sydney where she received her bachelor of commerce and bachelor of laws, she had very few mentors that looked like her or shared a similar background. In turn, she says, “I’ve always wanted to supply mentorship to other people where I can and not to say that I have all the answers. I think it’s really important to have people tell it to you like it is, and for them to feel enabled in their personal goals but also to feel comfortable with challenging me and kind of tugging at the edge of my worldview.” Who will star on Zhang’s first cover and what should we expect across Vogue China’s multiple platforms? “Gone are the days, in many ways, that you could just have, you know, a nameless, faceless, voiceless face in a fashion editorial,” she says. “People want to understand, OK, what value are they adding? What opinions do they hold? And how can I really relate to that?” She says two main areas of concern for her are sustainability, and diversity and inclusion. “But,” she cautions, “it’s not about having a green issue here or a sustainability conversation there. It’s about how you practise those principles, and it’s the same thing with diversity.” She continues: “I think everyone who appears in Vogue China should be someone people can look up to in a really substantive way and who are driving innovation, regardless of what industry they’re in.” Read Next: All 27 Vogues Unite on The Creativity Issue: A Global Celebration of Fashion’s Artistic Spirit Originally published on The post.

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Anya Taylor-Joy’s Golden Globes Look Is Pure Dior Fantasy, Says Stylist Law Roach

Photo: Sami Drasin Anya Taylor-Joy’s custom Dior dress manages to pay homage to both the major Hollywood moments she is nominated for. The retro-infused couture gown, which the actor’s stylist Law Roach says is “very much in the wheelhouse of Monsieur Christian Dior”, conjures up the essence of Emma, the remaking of Jane Austen’s 1815 novel in which Taylor-Joy plays the titular role, and The Queen’s Gambit, the historical drama charting the rise of a female chess prodigy in the ’60s. The romanticism of the modernized Dior silhouette transcends time, and the different worlds Taylor-Joy’s two characters inhabit. “[Dior creative director] Maria Grazia Chiuri really let us live out our fantasy and do something in homage to both Monsieur Dior and Anya’s characters,” shares Roach who frosted the look with Tiffany & Co jewelry. “The dress is retro, but modern and cool at the same time.” Law, a self-described image architect who sees his clients as walking editorials, was not deterred by the fact the bespoke look would only be visible via a small Zoom square. “Fashion is supposed to be fantasy,” he asserts. “It transports someone to somewhere else, and Anya is the type of client who understands this, so why not go big?” “I love to say she is fearless, but there’s something special about her in general,” continues Roach. “Her physicality, her beauty…” Taylor-Joy sought out Roach for the Emma press tour, which saw her wear vintage Bob Mackie, daring Halpern and an artisanal Loewe dress that is now in the Met Museum. “When people come to me, there’s normally a burning thing they need to get out of their system,” Roach explains of his unabashedly bold approach to design. “I’m the key to unlocking it.” With Taylor-Joy, it was not a case of an extrovert bursting to get out. Rather, she wanted to play with fashion and wear things she had never worn before. “I am not a demure stylist known for little black dresses – those who choose to work with me know this,” adds Law, who is best known for transforming Zendaya from a Disney princess into a bonafide fashion plate. After the pandemic cut short their first spell of working together, it seems unfair that Law and Anya’s reunion should be limited to a remote affair. But, Roach promises, “the content created before and after the Globes is where the magic will happen.” When you sign up to the #fLAWless school of styling, to which wallflowers need not apply, you expect to shut down Instagram. For a woman who has brightened up lockdowns all over the world with her acting work, it’s thrilling to see Taylor-Joy get her own time in the spotlight. Read Next: The Best Dressed Stars at the 2021 Golden Globes Originally published on The post.

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Forget the Mini Bag, Prada Presents its Most Ingenious ‘Handbag’ Yet

Courtesy of Prada Courtesy of Prada Courtesy of Prada Courtesy of Prada Courtesy of Prada 1 As 2021 shapes up to be the year that we return to the dancefloor, Mrs Prada and soundtrack. The ingenious, finishing touch? A haute glove purse that will see you bypass the coat check and go entirely ‘hands-free’. From zinging geometric opera gloves (styled with faux-fur shawls, cinching polo-neck knit catsuits and plunging sweater dresses) to neat gauntlets — the practical pouches we’ve all been hooked on ever since the rebirth of the bum bag (circa 2017) have undergone an alluring overhaul. (Think: Hitchcock heroine does Berghain). Granted, there’s just enough room for a lip balm plus a single house key and certainly no space for a smartphone. Which is perhaps the most powerful Prada-Simons addendum of all — the suggestion that when we return to the dancefloor this fall, we can leave the content-making at home and just enjoy the moment. Something Marc Jacobs referred to in the post-show round table as “the art of living”. Read Next: 10 Things Every Fashion Enthusiast Should Know About Prada’s Iconic History Originally published on The post.

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Prince Harry Just Gave a Rare Insight into His and the Duchess of Sussex’s Lives as Parents

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor. Photo: Getty Prince Harry and. In a recent interview with English television host James Corden on The Late Late Show, royal fans got a rare insight into the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s lives as parents. Prince Harry lit up while speaking about Archie and revealed to Corden what their son’s first word was. He said, “His first word was ‘crocodile’, three syllables”. The proud father added, “My son is now over a year and a half. He is hysterical; he’s got the most amazing personality; he’s already putting two, three words together; he’s already singing songs.” The Duke of Sussex went on to share what his son’s go-to breakfast was, revealing that it was one made using a gift from Archie’s great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II. He told Corden, “My grandmother asked us what Archie wanted for Christmas and Meg said a waffle maker. She sent us a waffle maker for Archie. So breakfast now, Meg makes up a beautiful organic mix in the waffle maker. Archie wakes up in the morning and goes ‘waffle.’” The interview also saw Prince Harry speak candidly about stepping back as senior royals with Meghan, Duchess of Sussex. He explained to Corden that the decision aimed to prioritize his mental health protect his family. He said, “It was never walking away—it was stepping back rather than stepping down. It was a difficult environment, as I think as lot of people saw. We all know what the British press can be like, and it was destroying my mental health. I was like, ‘This is toxic.’ So I did what any husband and father would do—I was like, ‘I need to get my family out of here.’” The Duke and which will be aired on March 7. Read Next: The Deeper Meaning of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Pregnancy Announcement The post.

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The Best Dressed Stars at the 2021 Golden Globes

The term channeled the opulence of the silent era with a salmon-pink Oscar de la Renta creation that alluded to her Mank alter-ego, Marion Davies. How one chose to interpret the unofficial motif varied. Some kept things chic and straightforward. In an ethereal Chanel couture gown, The United States vs. Billie Holiday star gave viewers a taste of jazz age decadence. Her silk tulle gown with a sequin macramé bodice from Virginie Viard’s Spring/Summer 2021 collection was an airier version of the chanteuse gowns worn by Holiday as she took to the stage at L’Olympia Bruno Coquatrix. By contrast, Cynthia Erivo’s electric Valentino Haute Couture played with classic codes—a tea-length dress almost always nods to the past—while subverting them. Neon green with extreme proportions and platforms tall enough to make Lady Gaga raise an eyebrow, it commanded attention. Likewise, Regina King marked her historic Best Director nomination in an asymmetrical column gown by Louis Vuitton’s Nicolas Ghesquière that had enough sequins and crystals to light up the night sky. Glitzy without ever seeming fussy, it embodied the Globes’ celebratory spirit. Amid all the throwback vibes, Jackson and Satchel Lee provided some freshness in complementary Gucci ensembles. With Satchel looking elegant in a matte black silk, floral gauze gown and Jackson wearing the brand’s Grottesco jacquard on a robe-like jacket, the siblings had an innate star quality that bodes well for their fashion future. See the best dressed looks below. Anya Taylor Joy in Christian Dior. Photo: Sami Drasin Viola Davis in Lavie by CK. Photo: @violadavis and @shamarbenoitphotography Elle Fanning in Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of Elle Fanning Rosamund Pike in Molly Goddard. Photo: @mspike Regina King in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Satchel Lee in Gucci. Photo: Getty Images Kate Hudson in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Andra Day in Chanel. Photo: @andradaymusic Cynthia Erivo in Valentino. Photo: Getty Amanda Seyfried in Oscar de la Renta. Photo: @mingey Margot Robbie in Chanel. Photo: Getty Eiza Gonzalez in Versace. Photo: @eizagonzalez Sarah Paulson in Prada.Photo: @karlawelchstylist and @mssarahcatharinepaulson Emma Corrin in Miu Miu. Photography by Greg Williams for Miu Miu Julia Garner in Prada. Photo: @elizabethsaltzman and @juliagarnerofficial Sofia Carson in Giambattista Valli. Photo: Getty Images Nicole Kidman in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Carey Mulligan in Prada. Photo: @ewtmakeup 1 Read Next: 11 of the Most Shocking Golden Globes Moments of All Time Originally published on The post.

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Here’s How You Can Donate Your Beauty Products to Women in Need in the UAE

Photographed by Desiree Mattsson If you currently have more unopened beauty products than you need, now is a great time to give your dresser a little spring cleaning while making a difference. To help the women who were financially affected by the in the UAE, Haul In One, a beauty subscription box company is collaborating with the charity Stop & Help DXB on a new campaign. Launched on February 17 to mark Haul In One’s first anniversary, the campaign aims to distribute cheer to women in need by allowing participants to delivery their beauty products to “any and all women – those that are part of supported families in Stop & Help’s program, as well as single parents and single women living or working in the UAE.” Haul In One and, and their team will organize the pick-up. All the items received from participating individuals and companies between February 17 and March 10 will be packaged into Haul In One’s boxes, then shipped to Stop & Help for distribution between March 11 and February 17. Homegrown company Haul In One offers monthly personalized beauty subscription boxes that contain five to seven full-size items across skincare, haircare, makeup, and tools from brands worldwide. Founders Sanskriti and Prachee started the initiative in 2020 to help create a more inclusive beauty community. The brand strongly believes in giving back to the community, which is why they donate a portion of their proceeds to female labor camps in the UAE. “It’s been quite a year, and we feel there is no better way to celebrate our first anniversary than giving back to our community as a way of saying thank you for a successful first year,” the founders say. “Our aim is to just add a little unexpected sparkle to someone’s day and make our products available and accessible to them.” To donate your beauty items, contact 050 450 7550/04 570 6138 or sign up on Read Next: YSL Beauty Partners with the Dubai Foundation for Women and Children to Combat Intimate Partner Violence The post.

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Huda Kattan Stands in Solidarity with Asian Americans in the Protest of Racism

Huda Kattan. Photo: Instagram/ @huda Huda Kattan, the Iraqi-American founder of the renowned makeup brand,, took to social media on Monday to voice her opposition towards racism against the Asian community. On Huda Beauty’s Instagram story, Kattan claimed that violence against Asian communities has “increased dramatically” since the pandemic’s beginnings in China, and shares her disappointment on the matter’s “very little” media coverage. Photo: Instagram/@hudabeauty The renowned businesswoman and makeup artist highlighted her brand’s intentions to “draw attention to the violent hate crimes against the Asian community”, given the company’s stance against “racism of any kind”. In her attempt to raise awareness among her 47.8 million followers, Kattan shared a series of Instagram stories portraying several images and statistics on the issue of Asian hate. Kattan’s posts were followed by a video by Michelle Lee, the host of The Science of Beauty podcast, who addressed the issue of Asian hate along with other Asian Americans who also share their concern. The video serves as a call to action to viewers, beginning with a series of Asian Americans addressing the camera and stating that they “need your help to stop Asian hate”. The 84-second video continues with numerous clips showcasing moments of violent hate crimes towards Asian youth and elders, involving both physical and verbal abuse.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Michelle Lee (@heymichellelee) In the video, Lee suggests the systemic nature of Asian hate, claiming that “Racism was always there, but the Pandemic has given people an excuse to act on it.”  Former US president, Donald Trump, is portrayed in the video several times publicly referring to Covid-19 as the “Chinese Virus” or “Kung Flu” since the pandemic began in 2019 in China. Lee claims that the cause of the “disturbing rise” of hate crimes against Asian Americans “has been caused by misplaced hate and frustration over the pandemic”. As seen on Huda Beauty’s Instagram story, Kattan shared the hashtag #StopAsianHate urging her followers to emulate her efforts and share their support towards the Asian community. Similarly, Lee’s video ends with the same hashtag and the assertion that “Its time to break the model minority stereotype and stop Asian hate”. Read Next: Sister Act: Huda and Mona Kattan on Building Their Billion Dollar Empire as a Family The post.

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Your Virtual Front Row Pass to Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons’ First Fall Show Together

Prada ready-to-wear spring/summer 2021. Courtesy of Prada Milan Fashion Week kicked off yesterday with Kim Jones presenting his. The show is set to take place at 5pm GST today from an unknown location housing a set designed by Rem Koolhaas of AMO. The architect was also enlisted to design faux-fur-covered geometric rooms for Prada’s fall/winter 2021 menswear show, so viewers can expect a similar abstract set concept today. Like other shows this season, Prada will also not have a live audience. However, viewers tune into a conversation between Prada and Simons as the duo dives into the third installment of Prada Intersections. The conversation will feature virtual appearances from close friends of the fashion house like designer Marc Jacobs, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Lee Daniels, musician DJ Richie Hawtin, as well as Koolhaas, while YouTube head of fashion and beauty, Derek Blasberg, will moderate the event. Tune in via the live stream below today, February 25, at 5pm GST, to watch the Prada fall/winter 2021 show in action. Read Next: Now Available in Dubai, Miu Miu’s Upcycled Vintage Dresses are Wardrobe Treasures The post.

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5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s First Ready-to-Wear Collection for Fendi FW21

Courtesy of Fendi For his ready-to-wear debut at paid homage to the women who have shaped the house past and present, proposing a modern wardrobe rooted in Roman glamour. Here, Vogue brings you five things to know about the collection. It was Kim Jones’s first ready-to-wear collection for Fendi Courtesy of Fendi For his first turn on Fendi’s ready-to-wear runway, the F-shaped glass boxes that framed Kim Jones’s haute couture debut for the house last month had been filled with Roman ruins. “The couture show was about moving my mindset from England to Rome,” he said on a video call from Milan before the digital show. Now, he had arrived, ready to navigate that Roman landscape where the constant evidence of time has a way of pushing you into the present. “I wanted a wardrobe for women for modern times, with the DNA of what Fendi is to me.” That, he said, was the total sum of the many women that make up – and have historically made up – the Fendi family and its ateliers. They played muses to his collection, imbuing it with their effortless embodiment of modernist Roman glamour, and the no-nonsense charm that comes with living in a city that’s seen it all. Jones debuted his Fendi silhouette Courtesy of Fendi Jones presented his proposal for a new Fendi in powdery and earthy tonal looks, which he called “palate cleansing”, and which helped to clarify his silhouette through a screen. Lines either followed the contour of the body, or obscured it. In dresses – often knitted – the former case was made in a straightforward and easy silhouette, which Jones occasionally tempered with a soft magnified shoulder or a dropped armhole. His flou had a handkerchief sensibility to it, sometimes underlined by actual handkerchief hems, but most vigorously expressed in shirts and blouses oversized to the point of shrouding. Jones picked up those clues from his couture debut where some silhouettes entirely masked the anatomy, while others adapted a body-conscious Vionnet shape. That dress was repeated in this collection, in shorter versions with silk-satin wrap detailing that echoed that of Jones’s men’s suiting at Dior. Silvia Venturini Fendi was a muse Courtesy of Fendi It was inevitable that Jones’s work for Fendi would bear evidence of a life lived in menswear. In a transition that made it come full circle, he turned his spotlight to the wardrobe of Silvia Venturini Fendi, who remains creative director of accessories at her LVMH-owned family company. It was meta because Venturini doesn’t just design Fendi’s men’s collections but is known for her particularly handsome personal wardrobe, which incorporates elements of menswear, and has now ended up inspiring Jones’s womenswear for the house that carries her surname. Her signature look was evident in formidably-structured tailoring and jackets with an air of workwear about them, such as the caban in look 8, which Jones referred to as “the Silvia jacket”. “When I met her, she was wearing a very chic safari sort of dress. It was immaculate. It has that almost regal feel to the quality,” he reminisced, noting how Venturini has been his biggest source for Fendi facts. “She knows everything by heart.” Jones’s Fendi cut a contrast to that of Karl Lagerfeld Courtesy of Fendi Where the Fendi of Jones’s predecessor Karl Lagerfeld was always quite ‘dressed’ – although religiously light in materiality – Jones’s Fendi emerged as a more low-key, perhaps practical wardrobe. “Daywear, tailoring, dresses… things that have a certain ease to them, but which you can dress up if you want to,” as he put it. “It’s what I look at with the family: the way they can look so chic at work, and half an hour later they come to dinner a touch different, having changed the look.” Along with Venturini Fendi, Jones had mined Lagerfeld’s Fendi archives for references to adapt. “I think she likes the idea of someone interpreting it, because she worked with Karl her entire life,” he said. “It’s good to look at things from the outside. You see things you wouldn’t see when you’re immersed in it.” The show introduced new accessories Courtesy of Fendi With his natural eye for marketing, Lagerfeld famously drew the Fendi double-F logo, declaring it stood for “Fun Furs”. “He trademarked it straight away, and got them to buy him one of the most expensive houses in Rome as payment for it,” Jones smiled. “Or so goes the story.” He riffed on the house’s monogram in architectural heels that evoked the sharp geometry of Fs, and introduced a large soft bag with massive double Fs forged in hardware – a detail echoed in jewellery designed by Delfina Delettrez, Venturini Fendi’s daughter. “When Karl played with the Fendi codes, it was always in very clever ways. Not that I’d ever compare myself to him,” Jones said, “but I’m trying to think of things that can echo that going into the future.” Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show Originally published on The post.

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Tahar Rahim on Landing His Golden Globe-Nominated Role in The Mauritanian

Photo: Arno Lam Tahar Rahim was born and raised in Belfort, France, in 1981. Of Algerian descent, he recalls having a wonderful childhood, but that as an adventurous and energetic teenager, he searched for “something” to help rid him of his boredom. Belfort could not fulfill his ambitions. He realized his love for acting at age 15, which he developed by watching movies and going to the cinema. However, he did not automatically break into the world of film. Rather, he experienced a transitional period in sports and computer science programs, thinking they would open the doors to the future. He soon returned to what he loves most, cinema. Rahim enrolled in the University of Montpellier to study acting. After completing his studies, he carried his passion, his degree, and his backpack, and moved to Paris in search of a future that would realize his ambitions. The Mauritanian Rahim’s first acting experience was in Cyril Mennegun’s French documentary Tahar l’étudiant in 2005, which follows his financial struggles. His acting career took off when Jacques Audiard offered him the key role in A Prophet (Un Prophète) in 2009. The picture won the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival as well as 9 César awards, including Most Promising Actor Award and the Best Actor Award for Rahim’s critically acclaimed performance. “I worked hard to succeed in auditions,” he says. “Destiny was my best ally. I met Jacques Audiard by chance, on the set of a series I was playing in. I did not intrude on him, but felt that he noticed me,” he recalls. “Audiard returned the day the series was broadcasted. He watched the first two episodes and came to congratulate me. I felt proud.” Rahim explains, “I went to the auditions and succeeded. This is where the story begins.” The actor shares that above all, he did not want stardom to dazzle him. “I wanted neither to brag about success nor to change, so I kept to myself,” he states. “I preferred to persevere and maintain the same level of this role.” If Rahim enjoyed his success calmly, his choice offered him time to gain experience along with the confidence and the ability to choose the best roles. “With time, […] you know what you like most. Most importantly, you develop the ability to choose what suits you in terms of script, production, and other fundamentals of a successful movie, as it becomes a way that feels like an identification card,” he says, adding, “Years of experience have given me a great deal as well as fatherhood that changed my priorities.” Rahim is married to actor Leila Bekhti, and they have two children. Tahar Rahim in The Mauritanian With more than twenty movies under his belt, Rahim has always played prominent roles that were very well-received by the press and the audiences, from an Arab prince alongside Channing Tatum in Kevin Macdonald’s The Eagle and Samir in Asghar Farhadi’s The Past, to Gary in Rebecca Zlotowski’s tragedy Grand Central. These characters opened the doors for more wide-reaching performances, like his lead role in Fatih Akin’s The Cut. He has starred in numerous successful films, especially Garth Davis’ Mary Magdalene in 2018, where he played Judas opposite Rooney Mara and Joaquin Phoenix. The same year, he paired with Jeff Daniels in the blockbuster BBC series The Looming Tower in the role of Ali Soufan. In 2021, the actor faces promising challenges, with lead roles in two productions based on true stories. He will be the main character in a Netflix series produced by BBC called The Serpent, where he plays Charles Sobhraj, a notorious killer from the 70s. The series is written by Richard Warlow and Toby Finlay. Rahim will also be one of the leads in Kevin McDonald’s The Mauritanian, starring Jodie Foster, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Shailene Woodley. The movie tells the true story of a prisoner’s fight for survival against all odds. The prisoner Mohamedou Ould Slahi is played by Rahim. It is a role in which he takes the viewer into Mohamedou’s journey of agony with professionalism and feelings that stir up many an emotion. “It is great and also useful as an actor to play opposite an experienced, nice, and elegant actress like Jodi Foster. Here, the game is bigger, and the performance is more distinctive,” he comments. “Even with Jenna Coleman, there was great chemistry between us. We were able to find the note and this helped to succeed, especially when filming a difficult movie, like The Serpent.” The Serpent The challenge for an actor is to successfully play a role of a real character. “There are two ways to play such a role,” he comments. “If he is a well-known person, then you have no choice but to imitate them in every move so that audience can interact with the character. However, if he is an unfamiliar person, that allows the actor space since the audience will get first acquainted to them through the movie.” Commenting on the character preparations, Rahim says, “As for Mohamedou Ould Slahi, it was a big responsibility. I wanted him to be the first to see the movie and feel satisfied with it. I did not want to underestimate him or what he went through. We talked a lot. I was really surprised by his sense of humor and wisdom.” Rahim adds, “On asking him about his years of torture, his features, as I noticed, got tense, as if he was carried back to the past.” Rahim resorted to reduce questions and give more time for exploring Ould Slahi’s personality. “Mohamedou loving the movie was the biggest reward for me,” he shares. It’s worth noting that Rahim did not want to meet Charles Sobhraj, though he thought about it. “I got to know him through my research; the way he dresses, acts, and moves. I thought to meet him to know how he manages to deceive people. But, morally, and in respect of the victims, I did not want to,” he says. However, he needed to hear testimonies from people who met him. “There is no connection between us. So, I worked hard to perfectly match his appearance, firstly by quoting his look and moves. Thinking of an animal resembling him—the serpent came to my mind—specifically the Cobra that seems beautiful from the outward but has a venomous killing bite.” Rahim adds, “I was lucky to work with the film director Tom Shankland who has a deep knowledge of Sobhraj. We made our choices that later proved to be right when we got acquainted with Nadine Gieres, a real neighbor of Sobhraj. The description she gave us was exactly what we thought of and worked on.” If there was a connection to be made with Sobhraj, Rahim says, “It’s reflected in one sentence she said through our conversation: ‘I had to count on myself since I was 15 years old. No one wanted me. If I knew that fortune would smile on me, I would have waited. I took everything I wanted by myself.’” This statement can resemble the ambitious and dream-filled Rahim, but resemblance, ends here. He does not really know if he would accept playing roles he previously played. “I would love to move from one world to another, but no comedian or romantic roles were offered to me,” he laughs. Tahar Rahim in The Serpent Rahim is proud to be French-Algerian. He has a good command of many languages and comes from diverse cultures. “I’m more than French-Algerian; I’m imbued with the cultures I lived in,” he says, adding, “I grew up in the middle of a multicultural and multinational environment. A mix of cultures at all levels: in lifestyle, language, and food. This is the true richness.” It can be said that this background paved his way towards working with international filmmakers. “I like learning languages and mastering them,” he pronounces. Besides other under-discussion projects, Rahim is currently working on two French projects: a film and a Netflix series by Cédric Jimenez about the French Connection era and The Guerini brothers. When asked about the role he is most proud of, he comments: “I like all my roles and I’m happy with my choices,” adding, “Maybe Mohamedou is the dearest to my heart. This character goes beyond the film, it carries a message.” He adds, “Mohamedou does not hold a grudge against anyone. Out of this injustice, he learned wisdom which is great.” Photo: Arno Lam Rahim will not accept to play unconvincing roles or those that are not in line with his beliefs. He cannot even say what roles exactly he likes to play; as all depend on several factors, including the script. He is drawn to the actors of Hollywood in the 1970s, since they often played characters from real life. “These actors are timeless icons, like John Cazale, Gene Hackman, Dustin Hoffman, Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, and Meryl Streep,” comments Rahim. He also admires the works of many film directors, especially Adam McKay, Martin Scorsese, James Gray, and Bong Joon-ho. If he was not an actor, Rahim would travel the globe searching for his passion—now he can do both. He lived the year 2002 his own way, spending more than nine months in various shooting locations. “Above all, I learned to live the present,” he says. Read Next: Golden Globes 2021: Everything You Need To Know Originally published in Arabic in the issue of Vogue Arabia The post.

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Majida El Roumi to Perform at the Qubba Palace’s First-Ever Concert

Majida El Roumi photographed by Sandra Chidiac for Vogue Arabia Majida El Roumi is set to perform at the Qubba Palace in Egypt soon. The Lebanese singer’s performance on April 2 will mark the first-ever public concert to be held on the grounds of the Qubba Palace since it was built in 1872. El Roumi announced the news on her Instagram account with the message, “and we meet again.” Her last major performance before the pandemic hit took place in January 2020 at the Abu Dhabi Festival. During the lockdown, the single released a single titled Gha’no Bi Kel Lough’at (Sing In All Languages) and the Love Letter to Lebanon as part of her first-ever magazine cover story for Vogue Arabia’s June 2020 issue. El Roumi was filmed reciting the poem that speaks of her home country’s rich heritage at the historical landmark of La Résidence des Pins, Beirut. “An artist’s prestige lies in making their fans long to see them perform,” she shared with Vogue Arabia. “Recurrent appearances don’t serve the artist, but rather make their presence mundane, in a way that will not impact people.” Located in Cairo, the Qubba Palace is one of Egypt’s largest royal palaces, as well as one of the most significant ones during the Mohamed Ali dynasty. The structure’s construction lasted for six years between 1867 to 1872, and Crown Prince Mohamed Tawfik’s wedding officially inaugurated the palace. Since then, it became a popular site for the royal’s lavish celebrations . Following King Fouad’s ascension to the throne, he established a special railway station for the royal train so that visitors could arrive at the palace from Alexandria or Cairo’s Ramses square. Since the 1952 revolution, which turned Egypt into a republic, the Qubba Palace was turned into a presidential palace hosting international leaders and dignitaries. Read Next: Majida El Roumi on Her Love for Lebanon in Her First-Ever Magazine Cover Story The post.

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This New Personalized Shopping App Aims to Be the Netflix for Fashion

Founder of Sept, Yara AlDhaen. Photo: Hafsa Qasem Bahraini. Launching this month, Sept, whose name is a nod to the lucky number seven, is a fashion app uses algorithms to tailor style and shopping preferences. Ranking products in real-time, Sept aims to offer customers the opportunity to own their preferences. “We don’t all share the same music and film taste and our Spotify and Netflix reflect that; so why do we need to look at the same product feed, endlessly scroll, and then try to make a choice? We want to celebrate our customer for who she is and curate a shopping experience that fits her unique style,” states AlDhaen. Courtesy of Sept The idea came to the young entrepreneur while scrolling for a dress to attend a wedding. “As much as I love fashion, I found the experience exhausting and time-consuming,” she says. “I love my Netflix and Spotify because they get me, but when it comes to fashion, as much as personal style is so personal, the experience isn’t.” While AlDhaen may not have a tech background like many of her peers in the startup world, she isn’t lacking in gumption. Attributing the entrepreneurial experience as an “amazing learning curve,” she surrounded herself with a capable team and considered from the get-go – her naivety to be a blessing. “If you know how hard things are to bring to life, you would not start them in the first place. Being a young woman in a male-dominated industry with no tech background has been a challenge enough,” she says. Courtesy of Sept Made for the Arab woman, the Sept personalized shopping experience strives that no two feeds will be the same. It begins with a 30-second quiz – similar to Apple Music – to determine users’ favorite brands, cuts, and fits. A homepage sends daily “today for me” items and an option to swipe right for “me” or left for “not me” to help optimize. On the social feed, the user discovers what other Sept community women are admiring; once a customer clicks “buy,” she is redirected to a partner e-tailer – Farfetch, Net-A-Porter, Matchesfashion.com, Ssense, and Moda Operandi are already on board – to complete the purchase. Sept is available in the. Read Next: Is Chanel’s Lipscanner App The Future Of Beauty? The post.

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The New Season Hairstyles That Anyone Can Master

Photo: Domen/Ven De Velde No more unwashed buns; it’s finally time to drop the dry shampoo. giving their expert advice on how to make impressive styling simple. Jen Atkin on natural textures Joan Smalls. Photo: Getty Images “After months in quarantine allowing hair to run free, we are emerging from lockdown with long, beautifully undone locks. Now we seek to enhance this natural texture, the ‘I woke up like this’ look – an effortless, natural, organic style with loose, unstructured movement. Of course, not all of us are blessed with a hair type that will air dry to the perfect undone look, so need a little help. The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer with diffuser attachment is engineered to define curls and waves. The longer prongs reach deep into the hair to disperse air around the hair more evenly, simulating natural drying. For finer or straighter hair types where a natural curl pattern isn’t present, I recommend preparing with a waves spray before bending two-inch sections back and forth into an accordion pattern and placing into the diffuser. Use medium heat and low airflow to avoid disturbing the hair and causing unnecessary flyaways.” Sunwoo Kim on the return of grunge layers Alexander Wang. Photo: Sonny Vandevelde “I foresee refined grunge making a comeback – bluntly cut, sleek layers framing the face. A chic spin on the minimal, effortless hair popularized by the grunge fashion of the late 90s and early 00s. It’s a bold, versatile and low maintenance look. A textured hairstyle moves dynamically, creating an effortlessly cool look in photos or videos. The Dyson Airwrap styler is my go-to for achieving the messy, tousled texture of this look. After rough drying, go in with the larger 40mm barrels, styling sections at random around the head, whilst avoiding the fringe. Once the curls have cooled, run fingers through the lengths and allow the curls to drop for 10 to 15 minutes. Finally, disturb the style with a shake up with my hands and spritzing of texture spray throughout.” Matthew Collins on 90s-inspo space buns “Picking up speed in 2021, the 90s will continue to see a major resurgence. Expect styles with attitude as people become braver, experimenting with updos and hair accessories as a way to express their identity. The HBO show Euphoria has had a major impact on the trend of retro updos this year. As people break free from lockdowns, cool updos see people express a bold sense of style without a major cut or color change. Small, tight 90s’ inspired space buns with a centre part and straight highlighted ‘bold money pieces’ framing the face will be the look of the year. To achieve this style, start by parting the hair into a perfect centre parting before straightening with the Dyson Corrale straightener. Using a pin tail comb helps to achieve the precise line of the centre parting. Next, gather the hair into pigtails on either side of the head, leaving out small sections to frame the face, whilst combing the gathered hair to neaten any bunching or flyaways. Twist each pigtail around the base of the pigtail to achieve a bun on either side of the head. Fix in place with elastics and pins. Finally, straighten the front sections, bending towards the face.” Read Next: All the Hair and Beauty Trends From New York Fashion Week FW21 The post.

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Exclusive: Nadine N. Njeim is the Face of Mac’s New Limited Edition Collection

Nadine Nassib Njeim for Mac Cosmetics. Courtesy of Mac Following the success of her will once again join forces with Mac for a new limited release. The Black Cherry x Nadine N. Njeim collection will star the actor and former Miss Lebanon as the face of the Middle East campaign, shot by photographer Desiree Mattson. Launching on March 10 in Mac boutiques and online, the 15-piece collection features lip, eye and complexion products in a stunning cherry blossom theme. “I’ve been using the brand for years and I’m so excited to continue my partnership with Mac Cosmetics for the Black Cherry campaign,” Njeim tells Vogue. “I loved the whole idea of the Black Cherry collection, it’s perfect for spring and I’m also in love with the limited-edition packaging!” The Black Cherry x Nadine N. Njeim collection. Courtesy of Mac In addition to a limited edition mascara, liner and lip primer, the collection will also feature three shades of Mac Matte Lipstick, four shades of Glow Play Lip Balm, and four shades of Extra Dimension Blush, plus a special Cherry Blossom Fix+ Spray. Just in time for spring, each piece appears in pink sakura packaging, featuring pretty flowers inspired by the annual cherry blossom bloom. Courtesy of Mac “I love the whole collection, the products and shades are all well synchronized and I love using them together,” says the influencer. “I really like the creamy matte finish of the lipsticks, and the Glow Play Lip Balms are so nourishing and come in the most stunning springtime shades! The Extra Dimension Blushes give a beautiful smooth finish, and I find the liquid eye liner pen so easy to use to create the perfect line, along with the lashes to achieve the complete look. I also always use the Fix+ setting spray, and love that this one comes in a special edition cherry blossom scent!” The Mac Black Cherry x Nadine N. Njeim collection will be available in the Middle East from March 10, 2021. Read Next: Kris Jenner Might Be Launching a Beauty Brand The post.

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The Best Beauty Looks from Milan Fashion Week’s Fall 2021 Season

Courtesy of Fendi We’re three weeks into fashion month and onto our third destination for. Back in New York City, we saw angsty, smudged black eyeliner looks take over the collections for the fall 2021 season. Across the pond in London, dramatic blush and unexpected accents reigned supreme. What will be the top fall beauty trend in Italy? Only time will tell, but we’re definitely sensing a refined vibe with stripped-down makeup and sleek hairstyles on the agenda. With iconic hairstylists, like Guido Palau and Jimmy Paul, working alongside powerhouse makeup artists, such as Kabuki, Pat McGrath, and Peter Philips, masterpieces are sure to be upon us at, and Moschino — just to name a few. The looks at and LFW may have been bold and whimsical, but MFW is panning out to be more suited for minimalists whose wardrobes are dominated by the color black. Etro: Face-Framing Braids and Smoky Eyes Courtesy of Etro Not unlike the on-trend ’90s look, hairstylist Sam McKnight braided strips of hair into tiny, face-framing plaits for Etro. Foggy-gray smoky eyes by makeup artist Petros Petrohilos completed the 2021 take on the throwback aesthetic. Daniela Gregis: Dot, Dot, Dot Courtesy of Daniela Gregis Grab some white liquid liner, like the Danessa Myricks Beauty ColorFix in Lift, and an eye shadow brush to easily recreate the dotted look at Daniela Gregis. Dip the end of the brush into the liner and dab it around your eyes for a fun faux-freckles-meets-graphic-liner moment. Max Mara: Smoky Smudges Courtesy of Max Mara Rough strips of olive-green eye shadow blanketed lids at Max Mara. They were framed by bold, groomed brows and a barely-there coating of mascara. The rest of the models’ faces were kept fresh and simple. Prada: Slicked-Back and Shimmer Courtesy of Guido Palau Hairstylist Guido Palau followed up Prada’s blunt cuts from last season with unexpected, slicked-backed styles. The front section of the models’ hair was brushed back while the sides near the nears were left to hang down with natural texture. For makeup, Dame Pat McGrath blended metallic shadows of gold and silver onto the models’ eyes. Blumarine: Bedazzled Butterflies Courtesy of Blumarine With Y2K trends coming back around, body jewels were inevitably going to return too. Makeup artist Inge Grognard fashioned butterflies out of crystals on the models’ chests and arms at Bluemarine for a gorgeous alternative to jewelry. Moschino: Painted Ladies Courtesy of Moschino Several themes were featured at Moschino’s fall 2021 star-studded presentation: jungle, farm, and old Hollywood. Our favorite was the section set in a museum with stunning, paint stroke-covered models courtesy of makeup artist Kabuki. The body art was a welcome splash of color in the sea of neutral this season in Milan. Alberta Ferretti: Off-Center Parts Courtesy of Alberta Ferretti Middle parts and side parts may be dividing Gen Z and millennials, but Alberta Ferretti found a happy medium. The models’ hair was asymmetrically separated down the middle to create an off-center part before it was pulled back into low buns by hairstylist Sebastien Richard. Lead makeup Petros Petrohilos kept their faces fresh and simple, only sweeping on some taupe shadow onto the models’ lids to add subtle-yet-sooty dimension. No. 21: Graphite Eyes Courtesy of No. 21 The smoky black shadow at No. 21 gave us flashbacks to the edgy fall beauty moments at NYFW. Makeup artist Luciano Chiarello added sharp wings flicking out past the tails of the models’ brows of onyx with accents of metallic graphite on their inner corners. The result was a stunning, modern goth look. Hairstylist Paolo Soffiatti, on the other hand, added a ruffled-up effect to the models’ natural hair textures. Fendi: The Classics Courtesy of Fendi For Fendi, hairstylist Guido Palau braided several of the models’ hair into classic, sleek straight-back cornrows with their ends gathered into low buns. Others were given side parts. (They can’t be dead if Palau is still doing them if you as us.) The brows were the center of makeup artist Peter Philips’ contribution to the beauty look. He filled them in and brushed them up for timeless boldness to complement the models’ glowing skin. Read Next: 7 Runway Moments That Changed Beauty Forever Originally published on The post.

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These Six Films By Arab Filmmakers are Screening at Berlinale This Year

Souad by Ayten Amin. Photo: Courtesy of Vivid Reels The Berlin Film Festival, or as it’s also known, will take place from March 1-5 this year. Like all other events that took place digitally last year, Berlinale will follow suit in the same format. However, the film festival will split the cinematic celebrations into two events. The first will begin with an online event in March, and later, a public event in June, during a much safer time. This year’s edition will see screenings of six films by, out of which four are women. Beirut-born director duo Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Egyptian filmmaker Ayten Amin and Lebanese director Eliane Raheb are among the few directors chosen to present their work at Berlinale 2021. The official lineup also includes Egyptian filmmaker Sharief Zohairy, Argentinian-Lebanese George Peter Barbari, and Palestinian director Samaher Alqadi. The film Memory Box by Hadjithomas and Joreige will make its premiere at Berlinale. The film follows a single mother from Montreal who is confronted by her memories of the Lebanese civil war during the 1980s and is also in the running to win the film festival’s Golden Bear award. Screening in the Panorama section of the festival, Raheb’s Miguel’s War is about a Lebanese man who finds himself oppressed by society throughout his youth. To make a place for himself within society, the man participates in the Lebanese civil war. Souad by Amin tells the story of how social media affects young girls’ lives approaching adulthood. Like Miguel’s War, this film will also be screened at the Panorama section of the festival. Also featured in the category is Barbari’s directorial debut Death of a Virgin and The Sin of Not Living. The story takes notes from the director’s own life and follows four young Lebanese men on their quest to win their acceptance into manhood. Berlinale will also be screening As I Want, a documentary by Alqadi that features the mass protests all over Egypt due to a string of sexual assaults in Cairo. The documentary is a hard-hitting and inward journey in which individual liberty links to the collective process of liberation in the Arab world. Forum Expanded, which is another section of the film festival, explores experimental cinema and art installations. This year, the section includes a five-and-a-half-hour documentary from Zohairy titled Seven Years Around the Nile Delta. Shot over seven years capturing the Nile Delta at the start of the Egyptian revolution in 2011, the film is a half road movie and half an epic travelogue. Forum Expanded will also include an art installation from Beirut-born artist Haig Aivazian. Although little is known about Aivazian’s piece, his previous pieces explore sculpture, performance, and drawing. Read Next: These Two Films By Female Arab Directors Have Been Shortlisted for an Oscar The post.

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Is Chanel’s Lipscanner App The Future Of Beauty?

So, you’ve spotted a photo of Bella Hadid wearing a red coat that would be the perfect shade of lipstick, but you can’t find it anywhere. Using AI technology, Chanel’s new Lipscanner app lets you scan any color and it will show you its nearest lipstick match — and you can virtually try it on. Courtesy of Chanel If you’ve ever had a hard time finding the right shade of nude or the perfect red to match your outfit, Chanel’s new lipstick. A model in a magazine, a friend over Zoom, or, just scan an image of your chosen color and the app will match it up to a Chanel product from one of five color families — natural, pink, orange, red or plum. It also offers up the most suitable texture — a matte, shine, gloss, satin, or metallic. And it doesn’t even have to be matched from a photo of a person — you can scan the color from a favorite suit or an evening bag you currently have no other use for. As for being able to try it on during a global pandemic — with stores around the world shut due to Covid-19 restrictions — the app has that covered too, allowing you to virtually try the lipstick on. “Whether virtual or IRL, creativity has no limits,” says Chanel, in a statement. “Feed your inspiration everywhere and at all times.” A collaboration between Chanel’s Makeup Creation Studio and CX Lab, Lipscanner is an exciting example of what technology can do when used in the pursuit of beauty. With the algorithm trained to analyze hundreds of thousands of faces, the app is even programmed to take into account skin tone and lip shape before recommending the appropriate color and finish. The new app marks a first for Chanel and is a taster of what’s to come for beauty and cutting-edge technology. Chanel’s Lipscanner is available for iPhones via now
Read Next: How Virginie Viard is Reimagining Chanel for the House’s Next Chapter Originally published on The post.

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7 Runway Moments That Changed Beauty Forever

From the birth of grunge in the 1990s and the anti-beauty statements of Martin Margiela and Alexander McQueen to the celebration of diversity  — these are our favorite beauty moments of all time. Alexander McQueen. Photo: Getty From the birth of grunge in the 1990s to the celebration of diversity we see on the catwalks today, the landscape of beauty is ever-changing. Reflecting and reacting against the climate we live in, trends come and go, but there are those standout beauty moments that are etched in our minds forever. Here, we round them up. Marc Jacobs for Perry Ellis SS93 Perry Ellis spring/summer 1993. It’s 1992 and fashion is still on a comedown from the 1980s — shoulder pads, power dressing, big hair, glam makeup. Then along comes Marc Jacobs with his Dr Martens, plaid shirts and loose slips for Perry Ellis SS93. Inspired by the underground music scene in Seattle, models were sent down the runway with matted hair, flushed cheeks, nude lips and arched eyebrows — it was anti-establishment and anti-glam. “I wanted them to look the way they do when they walk down the street, which is not dolled up,” said Jacobs in an interview with, and yet it was a pivotal moment for both fashion and beauty, ushering in a new mood — one that celebrated counterculture, authenticity and individuality, inspiring generations to come. Maison Margiela FW95 Maison Margiela fall/winter 1995 In a time of supermodels and super designers, Martin Margiela was all about the clothes and the concepts behind them, cultivating both an air of mystery and anonymity with his white lab coats, ghost labels and famous rejection of all interviews. His when he wore a pearl-encrusted iteration some years later. Though commonplace in today’s world, masks would have gone against every cultural impetus of the moment — a time defined by logomania, tabloid news, rap music and celebrity culture. As such, it marked a key moment in beauty and one that feels particularly pertinent in 2021. Thierry Mugler FW97 couture Thierry Mugler haute couture fall/winter 1997. Photo: Pierre Vauthey Thierry Mugler was one of those designers who knew how to harness the power of makeup to tell a good story. For his FW97 couture show, it was the story of Kafka’s Metamorphosis, which culminated in model into a mutant creature — part animal, part alien — with a feathered headdress, supernatural yellow contact lenses, deep-berry lips, and shimmering blue and green lids. A departure from using hair and makeup as a means of enhancing beauty, Mugler set a precedent for generations to follow. John Galliano Haute Couture SS04 John Galliano haute couture spring/summer 2004. Photo: Condé Nast Archive For his SS04 show, John Galliano transported us to ancient Egypt. Enlisting the help of longtime collaborator Pat McGrath, models were. Think glittery lids that extended up to graphic brows, supersized gold lashes, shimmering lips, strategically placed jewels and chainmail fragments under the eyes, adorning the ears and accentuating the chin. It was a masterclass in the art of fantasy — one that we’re still very much learning from today. Alexander McQueen FW09 Alexander McQueen. Photo: Victor Virgile “I find beauty in the grotesque,” Alexander McQueen once said in an. “I have to force people to look at things.” That desire to shock and confront has given rise to some of the most subversive beauty moments in fashion. In particular, the ghostly white faces, bleached brows and huge, glossy, clown-like lips of FW09 crafted by Peter Philips. There was something deeply perverse about that combination, offset by, which he fashioned out of trash. It was a standout moment, one that spoke to anyone who has ever felt ugly or like they didn’t fit in — and one that lives on via the subcultural misfits and club kids of the Instagram age. Vetements SS15 Vetements spring/summer 2015. Courtesy of Vetements A disciple of Margiela, ushered in a new mood — one that was all about reference, irony, utilitarianism and a kind of anti-fashion fashion. As for beauty, models were street cast — a reaction to the big models of the moment — and unpolished, with dishevelled hair and angular features. This was about authenticity and idiosyncrasy, defying the homogeneity of the Kardashian era and relentless selfie-culture that was gathering steam. Charles Jeffrey SS18 menswear Charles Jeffrey spring/summer 2018. For his debut solo show, and anyone else who has followed suit. Read Next: What is the Role of Fashion and Creativity, Post-Pandemic? Originally published on The post.

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This New Chaumet Timepiece is Fit for Modern Royalty

The new Joséphine Aigrette watch. Courtesy of Chaumet A brilliant timepiece is one of the latest additions to‘s Joséphine Aigrette collection. The storied maison continues to reign in the craft of time-telling elegance with constant incarnations of historic fashion transformed for the life of a modern-day woman. Courtesy of Chaumet Launched in 2010 in celebration of Chaumet Paris’ 230th anniversary, the Joséphine collection boasts the contemporary femininity of Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais, Chaumet’s original muse. Not only was the Empress the first major client of Maison Chaumet, but her contemporary style along with her bold yet elegant character challenged her time. Chaumet’s additions to their Josephine collection aim to do the same. Courtesy of Chaumet The new Josephine Aigrette watch gracefully confronts everyday time-telling apparel to match the timeless elegance of the Empress. The unique pear-shaped watch radiates the femininity of an Empress, with a mirror-polished gold case and details delicately refined like a jewel. With no buckle in sight, the bracelet strap effortlessly wraps the wrist, characterizing the contemporary graciousness of Empress Joséphine. In Chaumet’s interpretation of the past, the new watch permeates the Joséphine collection with exciting variety, offering a myriad of colors, dials, textures, and straps suitable for every and any occasion. Whether you want leather for the day or satin for the evenings or a dial entirely in Pavé diamonds, the Josephine Aigrette watch seems to suit the needs of every modern Empress with utmost elegance. The Joséphine Aigrette watch along with the new Joséphine Ronde d’Aigrettes jewelry, take Empress Joséphine’s style to new heights in modern quotidian wearing. Together, the collection unites the true grandeur of a historic empire with the intricacies of everyday elegance, turning yesterday’s Empress into the fashion icon of today. Read Next: Is the Chaumet Tiara the Ultimate Accessory? The post.

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