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“Sheikh Zayed extended an unearthly kind of benevolence” — The Author of Assouline’s First Tome Dedicated to an Arab Royal

For the anniversary of Sheikh Zayed’s birth on May 6, Myrna Ayad, author of Sheikh Zayed: An Eternal Legacy, recalls her journey to penning Assouline’s first tome dedicated to an Arab royal, out this month. Sheikh Zayed in 1978. Photo: Al Ittihad Newspaper I am that person who scrolls down to ‘personal life’ when reading the profiles of people on Wikipedia. I am fascinated by the personal, believing it to be an individual’s core, a means to understanding and empathizing with them, a window that helps define and explain someone. As a child, growing up in Dubai during the Zayed years, I frequently saw pictures of this wise, handsome, and kind-looking man in newspapers and on notebooks and billboards. I listened to’s passionate addresses on TV and overheard my parents and family speak highly of him. He was Baba Zayed (father Zayed). My adolescent self regarded him as a saint, a sort of holy figure. He had to have been to have built this country that we live in and call home; he extended an unearthly kind of benevolence and compassion, comparable in my mind only to my maternal grandfather, Yussef Khadra. Myrna Ayad. Photo: Supplied And so, took up a special and exclusive place in my childhood heart. All along, I wondered – and still do – who was Baba Zayed? I wanted to know about his ‘personal life,’ and every time he was mentioned, I saved those nuggets of information in an attempt to paint a profile of this divine mortal. There was one story I went back to time and again, and which – very powerfully – revealed several facets of Baba Zayed: he was often spotted on roads in Abu Dhabi using his agal (the black cord used to keep the ghutra headdress in place) as a lineman belt to climb up a palm tree to adjust mesh bags that protect dates. As a child, I was awed at his sensitivity towards nature, but also the humility in all this: here was a ruler who felt compelled to protect a tree and its fruit. As I grew older, the story swelled in meaning: it told me he cared for details, was keen to help, and that no one could be too big or too powerful to do so. Sheikh Zayed: An Eternal Legacy. Photo: Assouline The story of how my family came to live in the UAE is one of sheer coincidence. It begins in the 1960s in the town of Bhamdoun in Lebanon, the destination of my maternal family’s annual summer pilgrimage; a 20-minute drive from the heat, hustle and bustle of Beirut, and 1 200m above sea level. Though my grandfather Yussef Khadra lived in Dakar, Senegal, where he operated several businesses, he would visit Lebanon a few times a year. One summer, the Khadras decided to stay in the then-luxury Hotel El Sheikh in Bhamdoun that was owned by the Matta family. My grandfather befriended the Mattas, who had been exploring business opportunities in Abu Dhabi. My grandfather’s interest in the UAE capital piqued; he flew to Abu Dhabi with the Mattas, partnered with them, inspected the land on which Hotel El Sheikh Abu Dhabi would be built, and construction began. The Sheikh in Al Ain, 1977. Photo: Al Ittihad Newspaper In 1968, Britain’s currency was devalued and its Labour government, led by Prime Minister Harold Wilson, decided against maintaining military presence east of the Suez. That included the Trucial States, a cluster of sheikhdoms along the coast, of which Abu Dhabi was one. Baba Zayed, who became ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966, long understood the power of unification and began working towards that. But people were nervous, my grandfather and the Mattas, too. And yet, my grandfather insisted on continuing construction and, essentially, giving this place a chance. Baba Zayed attended the hotel’s opening in 1969, and suggested a rename to Zakher Hotel, meaning ‘thriving’ in Arabic. Incidentally, it is also the name of an area in Al Ain, Baba Zayed’s hometown. Zakher Hotel did indeed thrive and became a key meeting point in the UAE capital. A little over a decade after Zakher Hotel’s opening, Lebanon was being ripped apart by civil war and the Israeli invasion. We were evacuated and the family decided to wait things out in the UAE. We’ve been here ever since. Myrna Ayad with her mother, Iman Ayad, and sister Dima at The Hyatt Regency Dubai Galleria, mid 1980s. Photo: Supplied Like any writer, I have a deep passion and covetousness for certain magazines, books, and publishing houses. Assouline is high up on that list and I’ve been collecting its books for years. When I received an invite to the opening of its Dubai store in 2018, something clicked. Perhaps taking the UAE leadership’s cue of ‘nothing is impossible,’ I pitched some editorial ideas, one of which was to author a book on Sheikh Zayed. I wanted to get to know him and tell the world about him, too. Two years later and Assouline’s first book on an Arab and a royal, Sheikh Zayed: An Eternal Legacy, is being published this month, in parallel with Sheikh Zayed’s birthday on May 6 and the 50th anniversary of the UAE. The book is a tribute to two great men, my grandfather and Baba Zayed, to whom I am eternally indebted. It has allowed me to gather so many more nuggets of Baba Zayed’s ‘personal life,’ none more so than the power to believe.
As told to Caterina Minthe. Originally published in the May 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia Read Next: The post.

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Exclusive: Rula Galayini’s Latest Collection Pays Tribute to Lebanon with a New Brand Logo

Photo: Courtesy of Rula Galayini Lebanese designer latest collection titled Romancing Tomorrow is an ode to her country’s resilient spirit and people. The spring/summer handbag collection sees the launch of a new brand logo — an embossed R protruding from the bag’s metallic base. The newly revamped logo is Galayini’s love letter to Lebanon, embodying a phoenix rising from the ashes alongside a revolutionary sentiment. It speaks of resilience, the determination to rebuild, and the pursuit of making things right. Vogue Arabia spoke to the designer about the thought process behind the newly refurbished logo and the new pieces. Photo: Courtesy of Rula Galayini Why was it important for you to introduce the new brand logo after such a trying year? The past year had been a great, unprecedented opportunity to sit back and reflect on things – both on a professional and personal level. It was the time to reflect on my purpose as a mother, as a creator, and above all as an individual. Ten years ago when I created Rula Galayini, the purpose was twofold: firstly to support local artisans who were being threatened by the influx of the mass-produced, and secondly to highlight, represent and export a piece of beauty from my region, so often victim to much negative stereotype. Looking back at all that my country has recently been through and what my people are struggling with today, I wanted the brand’s raison d’etre to be as loud as ever. Photo: Courtesy of Rula Galayini How did the blasts in Beirut affect your creativity and production? Firstly, the blast happened right in the heart of Beirut’s creative community. Our workshops, factories, and many of our artisans’ homes sustained major damage if they were not completely destroyed. Furthermore, our logistics facility is located at the port itself so it literally crumbled to the ground, causing a major setup back to our international logistics operation. And this is not to speak of the emotional damage caused. I remember reading a statement released on August 4 that read, “We’re all dead today. If it didn’t kill our bodies, it killed our hearts.” Nothing summed the sentiment better. The moment, I heard the news, I remember stumbling to call my parents, my inlaws, my friends to make sure they were alive. Never mind if their homes were destroyed, their memories buried. That all seemed trivial at the time. And then, I began to feel an overwhelming sense of guilt for having been abroad.  For having escaped the horror. For having the privilege to live in a non-toxic environment. For being able to actually live as opposed to just exist. But then buried under a few weeks of disbelief, shock, bitterness, and helplessness, I uncovered a renewed sense of purpose. Photo: Courtesy of Rula Galayini Talk us through the creative process behind designing the new pieces.  Rula Galayini bags have typically had very discrete branding. Our aspiration was to create a strong aesthetic identity without the use of names, but rather through a visual language that became iconic to the brand. When designing the new logo, I wanted to remain true to that. But since there lies heavy symbolism in this season’s story, having one letterform was key in kickstarting that conversation. The ‘R’ is highly stylized in a matter that is reminiscent of contemporary architecture, which is an infinite source of inspiration. Then came the notion of what the ideal material and finishing would be ideal. Ultimately, brass was chosen in a rich gold-plated coating. The base of the plaque is lackluster but then a glossy gold ‘R’ protrudes through as though to insinuate brighter days ahead. Since we design for a diversity of markets, we wanted to ensure the specificity of our story resonated well on a global level. The last year has been a challenging, eye-opening year for all. Whether people restructured their priorities and lifestyles, there is an unprecedented sense of mindfulness that now consumed us as. And this is, no doubt, one of the silver linings that happened to us. To that end, we wanted our new pieces to facilitate a sense of control in today’s unpredictable world. Secondly, women are buying smarter so our new pieces are timeless and versatile to cover as many walks of life as possible. Photo: Courtesy of Rula Galayini What’s next for Rula Galayini the brand? India has been the latest market for us to land in. We are really happy about that as we had noticed a growing popularity of our products among the young, fashion-forward Indian tourists visiting Dubai. We’re also focusing more of our efforts on growing our e-commerce outreach and offering as well as creating a meaningful sense of community amongst our customers and fans. We have also recently opened a B2B line of business where we provide retail consultancy services to both regional and international fashion and beauty brands, who inspire to create meaningful experiences. Read Next: How Rula Galayini’s SS20 Collection is a Tribute to Working Mothers The post.

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How the Pixie Cut Evolved into Today’s Biggest Beauty Shakeup

Jazz-Age Flapper, Vogue Magazine, circa 1927. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images) It’s been a big year for beauty changes, particularly when it comes to hair. Over the past few weeks alone, celebrities including have all decided to freshen up their look with a super-short pixie cut. In fact, the pixie has emerged as one of the most directional cuts for 2021, but this style also has an interesting history.  A brief history of the pixie cut  Twiggy. Photo: Getty One of the first examples of women embracing short hair dates back to the early 1800s in France, when women wore the Titus haircut, which was thought to have been inspired by the way a person’s hair was cut before they were put in the guillotine. Unsurprisingly, the trend didn’t stick and long hair remained the dominant look, with the exception of the 1920s and its introduction of the bob — a subversive cut popularised by the flappers.  Audrey Hepburn. Photo: Getty In the 1930s and 1940s, as flapper style faded, there was a return to longer lengths. Fast-forward to the 1950s, and the pixie cut as we know it today — though not quite as short — was born. Popularised by the actors Audrey Hepburn and Jean Seberg who boldly rejected the long waves and coifs of their silver-screen counterparts, the pixie became a symbol of nonconformity and empowerment. “Hepburn went a long way to making short hair mainstream and got a lot of credit for popularising the pixie cut, particularly in her 1953 movie Roman Holiday,” explains hair historian. In the film, Hepburn is seen hacking off her own hair to mark a new beginning for her character and a newfound sense of freedom. After that, the pixie was fully integrated into modern culture. The youthquake and sexual revolution of the 1960s brought with it ideas of gender fluidity, which meant icons such as Twiggy and Mia Farrow could go even shorter with their cuts.  As fashion ebbed and flowed, the 1970s marked a return of long hair, but then came the 1980s and 1990s and the pixie was back. “When the pixie cut surged in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was demanded that it be very feminine,” says Michael Angelo, stylist and owner of New York’s. Think Cyndi Lauper, Linda Evangelista and Princess Diana — these cuts were softer than their 1960s counterparts, but nonetheless impactful.  Winona Ryder. Photo: Getty By the late 1990s and early 2000s, the pixie had become less about gendered rebellion and more a statement of individuality and a celebration of alternative beauty. Take Toni Braxton, Halle Berry, Monica and TLC’s T-Boz. “The pixie cut will always remind me of cool, alt 1990s girls who wore a much more DIY take on the cut. Chloë Sevigny in Kids [1995], [model] Jenny Shimizu and Winona Ryder are all amazing examples,” says Gibson. These were women who chopped off their hair as a means of empowerment, free from the shackles of the narrow beauty ideals that were dominant at the time. The pixie cut as a symbol of individuality Zoë Kravitz. Photo: Getty Today, the pixie feels just as poignant. Stylist, who chopped Demi Lovato’s recent pixie, tells Vogue: “It was about her owning herself and choosing to do a look that represents what she feels on the inside. For many, hair represents a curtain of safety. There is a lot of fear with chopping your hair off. But once you do, you are able to own yourself in a way you never thought possible.” Unsurprisingly, there’s a reason why the pixie happens to be trending. The early 1800s, 1920s, 1950s and 1960s were all big periods of change and uncertainty. In 2021, with an ongoing pandemic, global social tensions and more, it’s no surprise that many people are regaining a sense of control and reclaiming their identity through their hair. In this sense, today’s pixie has come to represent the kind of freedom that people have been craving after more than a year spent working from home, not seeing friends and minimal travel. “A radical shift like long to short, a shedding of the old ways, feels really fresh and exciting,” says Angelo. “I’m definitely seeing an increase in pixie cuts,” says, a creative director at Sally Hershberger’s Los Angeles salon. “After a long winter at home, people are seeking a fresh ‘lighter’ look, and the pixie is a great way to shear off dead strands and start new for the season.” Photo: Getty Others put the rise of today’s pixie cut down to an increased sense of nostalgia. “The appearance and discussion about Princess Diana is at its peak right now with two documentaries on Netflix, the recent interview with Meghan and Harry, and the Netflix series The Crown,” explains trend forecaster. The influence of the gender-neutral beauty movement has also been undeniable in the pixie cut’s comeback. “The pixie cut for 2021 says ‘take me seriously’, not ‘look how pretty I am’, while still being incredibly flattering,” explains Angelo. “Today, our views on gender are paving the way for haircuts that can be as feminine or masculine as the person wearing it wants it to be.” How will it evolve? Halle Berry. Photo: Jeffrey Mayer/WireImage So, what will the future of the pixie cut look like? Gibson predicts, “Post-lockdown, we’re in for a 1920s style return to glamour and dressing up, and hair cuts feel like the perfect accompaniment,” she says. “Rather than just an inch off the ends and a nice blow dry, it’s really exciting to feel that people are going to embrace cuts that have structure and shape, and are technically complicated. It’s great news for hairdressers and it’s going to be really impactful on fashion, too.” Modern pixies look great with chunks of fun colours or in soft blondes or bold reds — you can create an entirely different, but equally as bold look once you add colour to the mix. Tastemakers such as Zoë Kravitz, Halsey and Teyana Taylor prove that you can wear a cool pixie with little effort. But the runway is where we’ve really seen the pixie go experimental with colour: at Dolce & Gabbana’s FW21 show, for example, hairstylist Guido Palau painted pixies all shades of cotton-candy pink and blue.  Ultimately, though, how you want to wear your hair is up to you. As Friedman says, “Hair is such a personal choice and can be a true representation of your identity. So, have fun with it and don’t be afraid of change.” Read Next: 8 Secrets to Long Hair Just Like Sherihan Originally published on The post.

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Ramadan Treats: These Ricotta-Filled Semolina Pancakes Make for an Indulgent Suhoor

Photo: Sarka Babicka for The Jewelled Kitchen These semolina pancakes are known as beghrir, which means “1000 holes.” The name refers to the multitude of holes that develop on the surface as they cook. Semolina Pancakes
Serves 4 Preparation time: 25 minutes, plus rising Cooking time: about 30 minutes Ingredients • 125ml/4 oz/1⁄2 cup milk
• 1 tsp dried active yeast
• 1⁄4 tsp caster sugar
• 100g/31⁄2oz/scant 2⁄3 cup semolina flour (also known as fine semolina)
• 50g/13⁄4oz/scant 1⁄2 cup self-raising flour
• 1 tsp baking powder
• a pinch of fine sea salt
• 100g/31⁄2oz/3⁄4 cup blanched almonds
• 4 tbsp argan oil
• 2 tbsp clear honey
• 250g/9oz ricotta or ashta or clotted cream
• 30g/1oz honeycomb, roughly chopped 1. Warm the milk in a saucepan over low heat. Mix the yeast and sugar with 3 tablespoons of the warmed milk, then pour this mixture into a large mixing bowl and set aside. Reserve the remaining warm milk. 2. Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a mixing bowl. 3. Add the remaining milk to the yeast mixture along with 125ml/4 oz/1⁄2 cup warm water, and whisk well. Add the flour mixture a little at a time, whisking vigorously until it is well incorporated and the mixture is smooth. 4. Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and set aside in a warm place for at least one hour or until the mixture is frothy and has doubled in size. If you are not making the pancakes until the next day, leave the mixture covered overnight in the fridge after it has risen. 5. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 150 ̊C/300 ̊F/Gas 2. Spread the almonds on a baking sheet and bake for 5–7 minutes until golden, shaking the pan to toss them around halfway through the cooking time. Transfer to a pestle and mortar or a small blender and grind for about 5 minutes until you get a very smooth, wet paste, stopping to scrape down the sides every once in a while. Transfer to a serving bowl and mix in the argan oil and honey. Taste and add more oil and/or honey, if you like. Leave the oven on. 6. When you’re ready to cook the pancakes, whisk the batter. It should be the texture of double cream (thin with a little water, if necessary). Place a non-stick pan over a medium-low heat. Working in batches, pour 1 tablespoon of the batter into the pan to create a thin, round pancake, about 7cm/3in in diameter, tilting the pan if necessary, then repeat, spacing the pancakes slightly apart. Cook on one side for 1–2 minutes until plenty of holes have developed, the tops have set and the bottoms are golden. Stack the first batch of pancakes between sheets of parchment paper on an ovenproof plate and keep warm in the oven. Repeat with the remaining batter to make about 24 pancakes in total. 7. To create half-moon shapes, seal the edges of the pancakes together by pinching them together only halfway along. Spoon a little ricotta into each pancake, then drizzle some of the almond butter over the top, sprinkle with honeycomb and serve. Bethany Kehdy is a celebrated Lebanese-American chef, award-winning cookbook author, culinary anthropologist, presenter, and former Miss Lebanon (2002). The entrepreneur has cooked and consulted for restaurants, gourmet events, and high-profile figures the world over to full restaurant consultancies from New York to Mykonos. Kehdy believes cooking and eating should have no bounds and follow no superficial rules. Pushing the boundaries and dreaming up trailblazing takes on classics, neglected cuts and forgotten ingredients excites her. “I believe that cuisine, especially Middle Eastern cuisine, should evolve as it always has,” she says. “I also think it’s important that we become acquainted with the roots and history first in order to build on this knowledge and maintain the cuisine’s soul essence.” Read Next: Ramadan Treats: Let This Silky Chickpea and Lamb Soup Be the First Thing You Have at Iftar The post.

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Can’t Seem to Walk in Heels Anymore? This May Be the Reason Why

Photographed by Rocio Ramos If you’ve recently stepped out in a pair of heels for the first time since before the start of last year’s lockdown, chances are you’ve been left with a gripping sensation in the backs of your lower legs the next day. Right now, even the most hardened high-heel wearers among us are struggling with the return to ‘regular’ shoes, but why? “The biggest issue with wearing heels is that they cause the Achilles tendon to tighten and shorten,” warns Margaret Dabbs, CEO and founder of foot clinics, which treat the feet of international royalty, A-listers (pre/post red carpet) and supermodels, fresh off the runway. At the moment, they’re rushing to book Dabbs’ cult ‘medical pedicure’ — a 45-minute appointment that is a diagnostic tool, hygienist and foot ‘facialist’ rolled into one. “When you first start wearing heels again after a long break, the Achilles tendon will have adjusted.” So, if you’ve recently experienced something similar to ‘exercise tension’ in the backs of your lower legs after wearing heels, that’s why. But, do we actually want to get back into wearing high heels? Or is this the perfect time to part ways for good?  What impact do high heels have on our feet? While Dabbs recognises the feel-good perks of a higher heel (plus how “they play a part in shaping your calf muscles”), the negative effects on our Achilles tendons are just the beginning of a long list of wellbeing woes. Prolonged wear can cause plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the soft tissues of the feet, and throw off your posture.  “Leaning forward onto the ball of your feet can lead to back pain and have a knock-on effect on the skeleton,” Dabbs explains via Zoom — something to bear in mind after so many of us have spent the past year hunched over a laptop at a makeshift desk. Other side-effects are more visible. “If you’ve got a bunion, it’s going to be further exacerbated by weight being forced on to the big toe.” Remember that familiar, pre-pandemic feeling of toe cramp after a long night out? “That’s when you get such things as corns and hard skin (especially under metatarsal heads or the ball of the foot). When your toes are squished and especially with pointy shoes, you can develop hammertoes and, of course, you can damage your toenails, which can have long-term effects.” Women are also more likely to get Morton’s neuroma (a type of pinched nerve in the ball of the foot) than men. “It often affects thinner feet and can be exacerbated by wearing mules for longer distances. It can be really painful when you get up in the morning.” Photo: Acielle/ Style du Monde So should we ditch our heels for good? The short answer is no, but picking the right kind of heel and putting a time cap in place is key. “An inch-and-a-half heel is better than not wearing a heel at all,” Dabbs explains. “When you’re wearing a heel, the Achilles tendon is shortened, but without any kind of heel at all it will be lengthened. Ideally, you want to avoid both extremes.” Look for designs with lower and wider heels, which exert less pressure on the foot and offer more stability. Dabbs’ hack for easing back into your post-lockdown heels? “Always ensure that there’s a comfort pad under the ball of your foot.”  As for the time limit? “I would say don’t exceed four hours. If you’re going somewhere great and want to wear high heels — which we all can’t wait to do — put them on at the last minute and don’t keep them on for longer than you have to.”  There’s also good news for anyone who has something of a shoe-buying obsession. Having a variety of shoes on rotation will help ensure we’re not always exposing our feet to the same friction or pressure.  Which shoes offer the best foot wellness? Regardless of the style of footwear, the expert advice is the same: “Everything in moderation.” A rule that applies equally to our Birkenstocks and the recent homespun clogs revival, as much as those Y2K mules and vertiginous Vivienne Westwood platforms.  “The great thing about clogs is they come quite far up your foot, offering support. They’re also naturally roomy around the toes, which means you’ve got less risk of friction and compression, lowering the chance of hard skin and corns.” Birkenstocks also ‘hold’ your feet well, giving stability. But you might want to reconsider wearing them relentlessly with bare feet as they can be dehydrating.  “I will be able to spot a Birkenstock wearer just by picking up their foot because of the abrasive action on the heel due to the ridge at the back of the shoe. When the top layer of the Birkenstock itself has worn away, it can start to drain the skin of moisture and cause cracks.”  It also pays to double-check you’re wearing the right size Birkenstocks. “Length-wise, if they’re slightly too short, you’ll experience pressure under the heel, which will lead to a build-up of hard skin and, again, trigger cracks”. (A will fix it). If you’ve lived in sneakers this past year, consider upgrading to a wider-front style to avoid long periods of toe compression.’s roomier trainers come expert-approved and work with every iteration of the breezy summer day dress. The worst warm-weather shoe option of all? Flimsy ballet pumps, which Dabbs refers to as “a disaster”. Photo: Suki Liang The WFH slippers aren’t good news “It’s easy to think of sloppy footwear as beneficial because it’s comfortable. But, in the long term, it’s the opposite. Non-supportive footwear will be exacerbating and encouraging all the bad habits,” she warns. There’s also advice for anyone who’s embraced going shoeless this past year: take note of your flooring. “Walking on softer surfaces at home will no doubt feel amazing. Continuously walking [barefoot] on hard surfaces, however, can cause Morton’s neuroma.” Make footcare a part of your weekly self-care routine “You see a dentist and an optician for preventive care, but often people won’t really think about their feet until they hurt,” Dabbs tells Vogue. When you can see an expert, do. “I always like to think that we give you the feet that allow you to wear the shoes and sandals that you want to wear.”  Naturally, we’re not about to cast aside our seven-inch or Bottega Veneta’s quilted slides anytime soon.  Read Next: Flats or Stilettos? Anum Bashir and Diala Makki Debate Which Heel Height Reigns Supreme Originally published on The post.

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Celebrating Enduring Couture That Continues to Thrive in an Era Rocked By a Pandemic

Just like a century ago, when haute couture persisted through world wars, it continues to thrive today in an era rocked by a pandemic – albeit forever changed. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, shoes, Iris Van Herpen; headpiece, Iris Van Herpen X Casey Curran; nail artwork, Iris Van Herpen X Eichi Matsunaga. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia If had a patron goddess, she would have to be Demeter’s daughter Persephone, who cyclically died only to be reborn. As long ago as 1965, when what Diana Vreeland termed the “youthquake” was rattling the planet, the New York Times noted that “every 10 years the doctors assemble at the bedside of French haute couture and announce that death is imminent.” Around the same time, French actor Brigitte Bardot rejected Coco Chanel’s offer to dress her because haute couture – the bombshell complained – “was for grannies.” 00:00 / 00:00 Video View CountDo not alter this value. Validate Email Bardot’s snub was understandable. Haute couture had been predicated on “older, outdated ideas,” Schiaparelli’s creative director says. Chanel was a hoary 82 and haute couture itself – a government-controlled appellation – was more than a hundred years old. Though the antecedents of the haute couturier go back to Louis XIV in the 17th century, the French profession’s true founding father was Charles Frederick Worth, who in the 1800s introduced such novelties as the designer label and seasonal live presentations. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Alexandre Vauthier. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia Though, like a fairytale enchantment, the maison Worth lasted one century, it was the venerable master’s spawn – the fantasist Paul Poiret, the functionalist Chanel, the purist Madeleine Vionnet – who ushered haute couture into the modern age. Persevering through the first world war, the Spanish flu, and the Great Depression, the French couturiers not only dressed “tout-Paris,” but also exported hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of their coveted handsewn confections. “History teaches us,” Dior creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri observes, “that couture is extremely resilient and, above all, adaptable.” The second world war and the Nazi occupation of Paris, however, posed a nearly terminal threat to the industry. Vionnet’s vast operations closed permanently in 1939. Chanel shuttered her doors. Her rival, the avant garde Elsa Schiaparelli, escaped to the US. But the enterprising Lucien Lelong stayed open, defiantly thwarting Hitler’s grandiose scheme to transplant all of Paris fashion to Berlin or Vienna. So miraculous was the Lelong-orchestrated wartime survival of haute couture that in 1945, Diana Vreeland exhorted an assistant to return from Paris with a single fabric rose as evidence of the rarefied institution’s continued existence. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Fendi Haute Couture. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia More than Vreeland’s handmade rose (probably from the fournisseur Guillet), what bloomed from the ashes of the second world war was a fecund garden of “women- flowers,” wrote, who founded his maison in 1946, all wearing sumptuous “skirts like petals.” Before long, the Dior empire accounted for three-fifths of all haute couture sales. The remainder came from the other fabled houses of haute couture’s post-war golden age – Fath, Dessès, Heim, Balmain, Griffe, Rochas, Balenciaga – whose workrooms were as intricately structured as their lavish dresses, and whose formidable directrices were as lofty as a ballgown’s price. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Ashi Couture. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia Haughty personnel and intimidating invoices were just two elements of the old-school haute couture culture that drove legions of women in the 60s and 70s out of the storied salons and into brand- new, funky boutiques selling ready-to-wear. Yves Saint Laurent had initiated the pret-a-porter movement in 1966 with the opening of the first Rive Gauche store, on Rue de Tournon. Trendsetting shops, some as far afield as London and New York, soon usurped haute couture’s function as (in Viktor & Rolf’s words) “a laboratory of ideas and experimentation.” Predictably, by 1973, the doomsayers of Time magazine were reporting that the enterprise of haute couture was “breathing very hard.” Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Guo Pei Couture. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia As before, the rumors of haute couture’s extinction were greatly exaggerated. During the bullish decade of the 80s, Karl Lagerfeld revived the ailing Chanel empire with his cheeky reinterpretations of the house’s hallowed codes. And with a heady eleven francs to the dollar, nouveau riche Americans flocked to Paris on the Concorde, frenetically buying up whole collections and fervently embracing newcomer Christian Lacroix. Haute couture reclaimed its magical ability to serve – to invoke Roseberry’s metaphor – as a “love language” spoken between designer and client. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Viktor & Rolf Haute Couture; earrings, Hugo Kreit. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia In the 90s, after a market crash, recession, and Gulf war had yet again incapacitated the industry, LVMH chairman and CEO Bernard Arnault played Prince Charming to haute couture’s Sleeping Beauty. Arnault’s ingenuity lay in transforming haute couture from an entity that served not just private customers, but a brand. A demographic even larger than Arnault might have calculated began participating in haute couture’s previously esoteric rites – viewing collections, judging them, sharing them, and buying spin-off, logo-emblazoned status items, via the proliferating digital platforms that propelled fashion into the 21st century. Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, Viktor & Rolf Haute Couture; earrings, Hugo Kreit. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia Responding to the rapidly changing environment, the antiquated trade organization Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture morphed into the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode and safeguarded its future by modernizing its rules of admission, essentially unchanged since the time of Lucien Lelong. As a result, its roster of haute couturiers expanded from about 15 members in the early 2000s to 100 today. This updating of the bylaws has allowed many esteemed out-of-towners, such as Iris van Herpen, Elie Saab, Fendi (under Kim Jones’s direction), and Victor & Rolf to become “correspondent members,” and Guo Pei, with her new studio in Paris, and Christophe de Vilmorin, fresh out of design school, to become “guest members.” Rallying in the face of the pandemic and lockdowns this past January, 28 of the Fédération’s houses resourcefully presented collections during the three-day SS21 haute couture showings (albeit virtually). Malika El Maslouhi wears Lion Vénitien Necklace, earrings in 18ct white gold set with diamonds, Chanel High jewelry. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia Paradoxically, rather than hamper designers, the limitations imposed by Covid-19 freed them to explore new formats and engage with artists in other media. “Covid forced us to break through traditional barriers and explore new ways of presenting our conceptual ideas,” say Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren from Viktor & Rolf, whose creations addressed sustainability as well as the need for a “lighthearted escape into fantasy.” And, just as Elsa Schiaparelli, in the 1930s, enriched her own work by collaborating with Leonor Fini, Jean Cocteau, and Christian Bérard, so the present-day couturiers overcame Covid-induced constraints by merging their imaginations with the aesthetic worlds of filmmakers Anton Corbijn (Chanel), Nick Knight (Valentino), Matteo Garrone (Dior), and Christophe Tiphaine (Schiaparelli). “Fashion has always been the realm of the imagination,” Chiuri explains, “So it is natural for me to turn to a film format to express my project through visual stories.” For Roseberry, whose sensual collection was cleverly compressed into an Instagram-friendly three minute, 52 second video, the goal was “to create a format and a way of showing the collection that really lets the viewer experience it.” Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, headband, earrings, rings, Dior Haute Couture. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia The pandemic may have simply accelerated an inevitable evolution. Viktor & Rolf plans to “become more digitally focused, creating content that caters to each platform.” foresees a “mix between smaller, less hectic, live fashion shows and digital content.” Twenty-four-year-old Vilmorin, who gave birth to his brand during lockdown, doesn’t even see a need for “all that mise-en-scène and spectacle” of a runway event. Says Roseberry, “It’s a total reset.” Malika El Maslouhi wears dress, shoes, Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture. Photographed by Thibault-Theodore for Vogue Arabia No longer a resource-draining marketing exercise, haute couture – the ultimate “slow fashion” – now has the capacity to turn a substantial profit, as robust economies around the globe generate new clients, whose fittings might even take place through Zoom. “Covid has made people rush less and appreciate more the value of things,” Saab reflects. Among the freshly minted devotees of the most extravagant finery on earth are the very young, and – in a development that the sybaritic Sun King himself would surely appreciate – men. Fendi, Valentino, and Vilmorin all showcased their offerings on male and female models. As Ralph Toledano, president of the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, stated, “It seems that there are no longer any boundaries to couture.” Read Next: Editor’s Letter: Why Our May Issue is Dedicated to the Highest Artistries and Haute Couture Originally published in the May 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia DOP and video editing Cheyne Tillier-Daly
Photographer Thibault-Théodore
Style Lisa Jarvis
Fashion director Katie Trotter
Creative and set direction Nicola Scarlino
Hair Charlie Le Mindu
Makeup Annabelle Petit at Wise & Talented
Nails Lora de Sousa
Creative producer Laura Prior
Production Weird Fishes Studio
Producer Réda Ait
Retouching Curro Verdugo
Analog operator Maëlle Joigne
Painter Damien Caccia
Studio assistant Tom Kleinberg
Style assistant Francesca Riccardi
Set assistants Antoine Dugrand Castaignede, Amin Bidar, Thomas Jardin
Production assistant Adélina Bichet Elzey
Model Malika El Maslouhi at Viva Model The post.

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5 ‘Elevated’ Horrors Every Film Buff Needs To See

Mother! (2017). Photo: Shutterstock This year’s 93rd annual, and Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson were the first Black women to beat the competition in the Best Makeup and Hairstyling category for their work on the Viola Davis-fronted Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.  One Oscar curse, however, remains unbroken. After a decade of thought-provoking, technically accomplished and unabashedly unique ’elevated horror’ gems, the Academy has once again snubbed the genre in its entirety. To date, merely have been graced with nominations since the Oscars’ inception in 1929, with only one taking home the coveted Best Picture statue (The Silence of the Lambs in 1992). But don’t let the Academy’s surprising lack of recognition for some of Hollywood’s most well-received films fool you. This overlooked genre has produced more than a handful of cerebral, touching and, at times, deeply existential stories that will undoubtedly leave their mark on you.  Here are our top five elevated horror films to watch now. 1. The Babadook (2014) Photo: Shutterstock Often credited as being one of the first entries in the ‘elevated horror’ genre, Australian director Jennifer Kent’s exceptional feature debut is an exceedingly original, crowd-pleasing rumination on the impact trauma and loss can have on us. Six years after the car crash that killed her husband, single mother Amelia (Essie Davis) finds herself battling not only grief, but a malevolent entity — a fairytale monster called the Babadook — which has begun terrorising her young son Samuel (Noah Wiseman). The film walks a fine line between the supernatural and the psychological, revealing that there’s nothing more frightening than the most universal of truths.  2. Goodnight Mommy (2014) Photo: Shutterstock This Austrian chiller by Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala examines the unbreakable bond between a mother and her children. Ten-year-old twins Elias and Lukas anxiously await the return of their mother (Susanne Wuest) after her mysterious facial surgery. When she finally does arrive, her head is completely covered in bandages, and it soon becomes clear that the woman in their house bears no resemblance to the mother they remember. With stellar performances, a script that effortlessly walks a tricky tightrope and a twist that made audiences audibly gasp during the film’s premiere, Goodnight Mommy is a modern cult classic. 3. Mother! (2017) Photo: Shutterstock By far the most divisive film on this list, Darren Aronofsky’s (Requiem for a Dream [2000], Black Swan [2010], The Wrestler [2008]) allegorical nightmare split critics and audiences down the middle. Mother! tells the story of a couple (played by Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem) living a tranquil, undisturbed existence in the middle of nowhere. This tranquillity is unceremoniously interrupted by two strangers who bring chaos and violence into the couple’s home. To give anything more away would be doing the story a disservice, especially given the film’s gonzo crescendo, and Aronofsky’s vision isn’t for everyone. But one thing can’t be denied: Mother! is unlike any film you’ve ever seen. 4. Saint Maud (2019) Photo: Shutterstock British director Rose Glass’s claustrophobic debut follows titular Maud (Morfydd Clark), a hospice worker and recent convert to Catholicism, who is sent to take care of terminal cancer patient Amanda (Jennifer Ehle). While Amanda’s deterioration is physical, Maud finds herself unraveling in ways far more sinuous. Are there malevolent forces at work? Is it something more experiential? Glass’s vision — part character study, part possession story — is devilishly ambiguous, leaving us hanging until the final frames. The hell that breaks loose just before the film cuts to black will sink its claws into you. 5. Relic (2020) Photo: Shutterstock The scariest tales are those rooted in real emotion — stories that have something meaningful to say about the human condition, rather than rattling us with cheap jump-scares and jarring soundtracks. Director Natalie Erika James’s stirring feature debut centres on three generations of women, gradually confronting those truths we all try to keep at arm’s length. Rich in metaphorical storytelling, Relic is a mediation on life, love and identity. The moving denouement will break your heart as much as it will rattle your bones. This is one not to be missed. Read Next: Originally published on The post.

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Treat Your Family to a Salmon Feast of Roasted Head, Skin-Wrapped Milieu and Seared Tail

Photo: Sarka Babicka for The Jewelled Kitchen A fish in three parts is a conversation starter – and requires far less effort than it sounds. First, go for a wild fish, if you can. I love salmon for its fatty meat but I treat myself to it only occasionally because of the un-sustainability of farming practices. The head is the best part. It’s the sweetest, most succulent, most nutritious meat, especially the rapture-rousing flesh on the cheek and the collar bone. While not exactly made as Al Baghdadi had suggested, the recipe is in fact inspired by one in his 13th century Book of Dishes that called for a fish “whose head is roasted, whose middle is baked and whose tail is fried.” In my version, the Persian curry ghalieh (which is also a hit at my supperclubs) supplies adventurous eaters a more enticing dining experience. I’ve accounted for extra sauce as it can be enjoyed across the different thematic parts of this fish, should you wish. A 2 kg (4 lb 6 oz) whole salmon should feed 6–8 people, alongside other side dishes. Ask your fishmonger to prepare the salmon into the following parts: head reserved, tail reserved (skin on), and two fillets, skins reserved. Serves 8–10 as part of a multi-course
Prep 45–50 minutes
Cook 1 hour For the fish head ghalieh with tamarind and fenugreek: Ingredients • Salmon head
• 250 g (9 oz) pre-packaged tamarind pulp
• 80 ml (2 ⁄2 fl oz/1⁄3 cup) rapeseed oil
• 1 large onion, finely chopped
• 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
• 1 small hot red chili, deseeded and finely chopped
• 1 tablespoon fenugreek seeds
• 2 handfuls coriander (cilantro) leaves, finely chopped
• 1–2 handfuls parsley leaves, finely chopped
• 1 garlic head, peeled and finely chopped 1. Put the tamarind pulp in a large heatproof bowl, pour over 480 ml
(16 fl oz) just-boiled water and leave to soak for about 10 minutes. With
a fork, mash the tamarind until it dissolves in the water, leaving you with a thick, sauce-like paste. Strain through a fine sieve, discarding the seeds and tough fibres. Set aside. 2. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4. Line a baking sheet with baking (parchment) paper and lightly grease with oil. 3. Heat the remaining oil in a large, heavy-based saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the onion and fry for 3 minutes until translucent and lightly brown. Add the turmeric, chili, and fenugreek, and cook for a further 3–4 minutes, until aromatic. Add the coriander, parsley, and garlic and cook for 2–3 minutes, until the herbs wilt and darken in color, stirring often. Add the tamarind paste and reduce the heat to low. Partially cover with the lid and simmer for 30 minutes. See roasting of the salmon head in the next steps For the skin-wrapped salmon milieu with vegetables: Ingredients  • 600–800 kg (1 lb 5 oz– 1 lb 12 oz) whole side of salmon, skin removed and reserved
• 21⁄2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to grease
• 3–4 radishes, thinly sliced
• 3–4 small purple potatoes, very thinly sliced
• 1 carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
• 1⁄2 leek, thinly sliced
• 1⁄2 fennel bulb, thinly sliced lengthways
• 5 Cherry tomatoes, sliced Instructions:  1. For the skin-wrapped salmon milieu, lay the salmon skins vertically on the prepared baking sheet. Place the salmon on top, so it is horizontal on skin, and season with salt and pepper and half the oil. Arrange the vegetables around the salmon, brush with the remaining oil and season with salt and pepper. Fold the edges of the salmon skins onto the salmon. The skin should partially cover the salmon, like in the picture on the following page. 2. Next, generously brush the salmon head with the rapeseed oil and place on a separate baking tray. Roast both the salmon and head for 25–30 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender, the salmon cooked through and the skin crisp. 3. 3 minutes, until the skin has crisped up and the flesh is almost cooked through. Repeat for the other side, searing for another 3 minutes until the flesh has cooked through. For the salmon tail with date molasses and toasted sesame seeds: Ingredients • 1 salmon tail, skin-on, pat dry using paper towels
• 45–60 ml (11⁄2–2 fl oz) rapeseed oil
• 1 tablespoon Bezar spice mix
• 1–2 tablespoons date molasses
• 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted
• Flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Instructions 1. During the final 5 minutes of the roast salmon, prepare the salmon tail with date molasses. Place a non-stick frying pan over medium heat and add 2 tablespoons of rapeseed oil. Season the salmon tail with salt, pepper and the bazaar spices, and brush the skin with more oil. Place the tail, skin-side down, into the pan and sear on each side for about Final assembly Transfer the salmon tail to a serving plate, drizzle with the date molasses and toasted sesame seeds. Stand the salmon head on a serving plate and spoon the sauce around it. Slice portions of the skin-wrapped salmon into individual portions and serve with the vegetables. Bethany Kehdy is a celebrated Lebanese-American chef, award-winning cookbook author, culinary anthropologist, presenter, and former Miss Lebanon (2002). The entrepreneur has cooked and consulted for restaurants, gourmet events, and high-profile figures the world over to full restaurant consultancies from New York to Mykonos. Kehdy believes cooking and eating should have no bounds and follow no superficial rules. Pushing the boundaries and dreaming up trailblazing takes on classics, neglected cuts and forgotten ingredients excites her. “I believe that cuisine, especially Middle Eastern cuisine, should evolve as it always has,” she says. “I also think it’s important that we become acquainted with the roots and history first in order to build on this knowledge and maintain the cuisine’s soul essence.” Read Next: These Ricotta-Filled Semolina Pancakes Make for an Indulgent Snack The post.

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Ramadan Treats: These Assorted Ma’amoul Shortbread Cookies Will Satisfy All Cravings

Photo: Sarka Babicka for The Jewelled Kitchen These cookies are traditionally created using three beautiful wooden moulds, each engraved to identify their fillings. Ma’amoul Shortbread Cookies
Makes 25-30 pieces roughly Preparation time: 45 minutes, plus chilling and resting Cooking time: 15 minutes Ingredients for the dough • 140g/5oz/scant 1 cup semolina, plus extra for dusting
• 35g/11⁄4oz/1⁄4 cup farina (potato starch)
• 2 tbsp caster sugar
• 1⁄4 tsp ground mahlab or ground almonds
• 75g/21⁄2oz butter, melted
• 1 tbsp orange blossom water icing sugar, to dust Pistachio Filling  • 35g/11⁄4oz/1⁄4 cup pistachios 1 tbsp caster sugar
• 1⁄4 tsp orange blossom water Walnut Filling • 35g/11⁄4oz/1⁄3 cup walnut pieces
• 15g/1⁄2oz caster sugar
• 1⁄4 tsp orange blossom water Date & Walnut Filling  • 40g/11⁄2oz/1⁄4 cup pitted dates
• 4–5 walnuts
a pinch of ground nutmeg  5g/1⁄4oz butter, melted Instructions  1. Put the semolina, farina, sugar and mahlab in a mixing bowl. Add the melted butter along with the orange blossom water and beat well. Knead the mixture for 3–4 minutes, working it into a pliable dough. Cover with cling film and chill in the fridge for two hours. 2. Meanwhile, prepare the fillings. For the pistachio filling, put the pistachios, sugar and orange blossom water in a small food processor or blender. Whizz for one minute to form a rough paste, then transfer to a bowl and wash the food processor. 3. For the walnut filling, put the walnuts, sugar and orange blossom water in the washed food processor or blender. Whizz for one minute to form a rough paste. Transfer to a bowl and wash the food processor. 4. For the date and walnut filling, put the dates, walnuts and nutmeg in the washed food processor or blender. Melt the butter and add to the mixture, then whizz for one minute to form a rough paste. 5. Remove the dough from the fridge and leave to rest at room temperature for about 20 minutes before kneading it for two minutes. 6. Divide the dough into three even-sized amounts and roll out each piece into a long, thin, rod-like shape. Pinch off small lumps of the dough (about 2.5cm/1in pieces), and atten them with your palms, making sure it’s quite thin but not so thin that it will tear. 7. Dust the ma’amoul mould cavities with semolina and then invert
 and tap gently to remove the excess. Gently flatten the dough into each mould cavity and add the relevant filling. Bring the edges together and seal well, then flatten the surface to create a level base for the cookie to sit on, pinching off any excess dough. Gently release by tapping the mould on the work surface. Repeat until you have about eight pistachio cookies, eight walnut cookies and ten date and walnut cookies (which are smaller). Each of your cookies should be clearly stamped with its design. 8. Preheat the oven to 200 ̊C/400 ̊F/Gas6. Dust a baking sheet with semolina and place the cookies on it. Bake for 10–15 minutes for the larger cookies and about 8–10 minutes for the smaller ones until the sides are slightly golden in colour. Leave to cool, then dust with icing sugar. Note: I like to add the filling using the mould because I find it yields more consistent results. Alternatively, flatten the dough in the palm of your hand while making a hole in it, then stuff it with the filling, seal the edges, roll it into a ball, then finally press it into a mould. Bethany Kehdy is a celebrated Lebanese-American chef, award-winning cookbook author, culinary anthropologist, presenter, and former Miss Lebanon (2002). The entrepreneur has cooked and consulted for restaurants, gourmet events, and high-profile figures the world over to full restaurant consultancies from New York to Mykonos. Kehdy believes cooking and eating should have no bounds and follow no superficial rules. Pushing the boundaries and dreaming up trailblazing takes on classics, neglected cuts and forgotten ingredients excites her. “I believe that cuisine, especially Middle Eastern cuisine, should evolve as it always has,” she says. “I also think it’s important that we become acquainted with the roots and history first in order to build on this knowledge and maintain the cuisine’s soul essence.” Read Next: Ramadan Treats: These Ouzi Rice Pockets are a Hit at Any Iftar Table The post.

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MAC x Cruella is a Fiendishly Beautiful Collab

MAC x Cruella. Image: courtesy of brand The infamous fictional villainess, Cruella de Vil of 101 Dalmatians’ fame, may be an unlikely beauty icon at first glance. But take in her collaboration. MAC x Cruella. Image: courtesy of brand The 12-piece,” says MAC’s director of makeup artistry, Terry Barber. “It’s high glam with plenty of attitude, brought to a new generation.” MAC x Cruella. Image: courtesy of brand Cruella’s is at the forefront of the launch, with two crimson hues available in MAC’s Matte Lipstick formula, the bright red ‘De Vil in the Details’, and blood red ‘Camden Caper’, plus the light pink ‘Sweet-N-Vicious’. Three Retro Matte Liquid Lipcolors in two reds and a brown-pink round out the lips collection. Dressed in Cruella’s signature two-toned black and white, the ‘Cruella to be Kind’ palette includes eight matte, frost, and satin finish shadows in a red, black and white focused color story. Read Next: The post.

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Elisa Sednaoui and Antik Batik Team Up in Style for Good

Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles “I’ve loved. “Last summer we were talking with Gabriella, the brand’s artistic director. I suddenly thought it would be fun to create the perfect summer suitcase together. So I asked her if she wanted us to collaborate for the benefit of the non-profit,” she explains. Active in Egypt, Italy, the USA, and Mexico, Funtasia creates and promotes educational projects for children and youth using innovation and creativity as tools for self-empowerment. Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles The pieces selected reflect Sednaoui Dellal’s choices worn and loved most over the years. “We had fun updating fabric patterns. They all go together and bring us from day to night.” Shop an embroidered dress, a timeless brown suede fringed jacket, a romantic pastel-print maxi-dress with balloon sleeves, and a chic black camisole with gold embroidery lining its plunging V-neck among the various articles of the 11-piece collection. “Now that a vaccine is beginning to be available around the world, I’m allowing myself to dream of enjoying fun summer nights of celebration with my beloved ones,” she adds. Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles “I love Elisa. I love her energy and the way she helps others,” starts Corste. “Together, we have designed a collection to give joy, energy, happiness, and convey a free spirit. We joined forces for love and we give with love.” The limited edition Antik X Funtasia collection is crafted in ateliers in India. with the entirety of its proceeds donated to the helping children and teenagers obtain access to a high quality development, education, and creativity. Elisa Sednaoui for Antik Batik by Chris Singer photography in Los Angeles The Antik Batik collaboration is one of various initiatives that are currently active in support of Funtasia. Caffe Vergano x Funtasia coffee is distributed in Italy and the USA (at the exclusive retailer Eataly) and is on the verge of going global. T-shirts with Spazio, a clothing store from her hometown, is also in circulation. Just my Hat is a cap in collaboration with Italian best-selling author Chiara Franchi and Omayma Skincare offers its skin oil with the code Funtasia. Ever indefatigable on her quest to work with youth to help them reach their creative potential, the mother of two reveals, “There are a couple more cooking that are very exciting and I’m looking forward to sharing soon, two books, and more news on the digital side.” READ NEXT The post.

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The Post-Lockdown Destinations You Will Want to Disappear to Come the Long Weekend

With the world slowly coming out of lockdown, these are the latest destinations you will want to disappear to. Waldorf Astoria Ithaafushi, Maldives Waldorf Astoria Ithaafushi, Maldives In a country composed of 1 190 coral islands, spread across 26 atolls, mostly populated by luxurious hotels, competition is always at peak, with resorts working hard to offer the most exclusive experiences to their guests. One of their main targets is the affluent Middle Eastern traveler, a true luxury connoisseur, usually moving around the globe with large families. An overwater villa master bedroom A comfortable 40-minute private yacht ride from Malé (or 15 minutes by sea plane), the Waldorf Astoria Ithaafushi ticks all the boxes for Arab visitors, offering a relaxed but luxury experience, where guests feel pampered and have access to exciting experiences, while still feeling connected to nature and enjoying privacy. This is the place for your wedding or marriage proposal, honeymoon, or family trip. The villas on Ithaafushi private island Spread across three interlinked islands, the recently opened resort offers different types of accommodation, including the more traditional overwater, beach, and reef villas, but also the super exclusive Stella Maris Private Ocean Villas: dramatic duplex homes fully surrounded by water and only accessible by boat. All rooms are spacious, beautifully designed and finished, in elegant earthy tones, with accents of wood and copper details, private pools where you can enjoy the Instagram favorite floating breakfasts, and inviting swings overlooking the tropical sea. The villas on Ithaafushi private island For the foodies, Ithaafushi proposes 11 dining venues, catering to all tastes and age groups, from pizza to caviar. The standout experiences are the Shanghai style Li Long, the meaty The Ledge by Dave Pynt, the Japanese Shimizu lead by an ex Nobu chef, and the magical Terra, the elevated treetop restaurant. Built by hand with bamboo sticks, at Terra you feel as you are levitating in the sky under the stars, with the most beautiful, elevated views of the sea in front of you. The food presentation is impeccable and artistic (expect smoke and iced domes), with the menu featuring Maldivian lobster and yellowfin tuna with beluga caviar, among other delicacies. The spa pavillion The newest offer at Ithaafushi is also the most exclusive. How about a full island just for you, where all requests are made possible? The crown jewel of Ithaafushi is the biggest private island in the Maldives, covering 32 000 sqm. Hosting up to 24 guests, the property includes a two-bedroom water villa, three-bedroom beach villa, and four-bedroom residence, all interlinked by a well-manicured tropical jungle. All styles of food and entertainment can be organized by the concierge team, from fireworks to live music. Terra restaurant At the heart of the island is an open-air entertainment pavilion, decorated with local finds by local artisans and Ligne Roset furniture, with a cinema screening area, chef’s table, and pool and ping pong tables. There is also a private spa and a spectacular gym all surrounded by water, where you will feel like exercising just for the view. No wonder that in the Maldivian language Dhivehi, Ithaafushi means pearl… Private island from US $100 000 per night. One&Only Portonovi, Montenegro One&Only Portonovi Situated along the Adriatic Sea in Montenegro, the One&Only Portonovi welcomes guests to a picturesque world of untapped beauty. The ultraluxury resort is One&Only’s first in Europe, sitting on the natural wonder of Boka Bay in the historic town of Kotor, a Unesco World Heritage Site. Suite one bedroom The one-of-a-kind location also features a 238-berth superyacht marina and helipad. The resort is built to resemble the architectural style of the old Venetian palaces found in the region, with grand facades, majestic colonnades, elaborate gardens, and indoor and outdoor pools matched with a private sandy beach. The One&Only’s elegant accommodation is positioned for guests to enjoy views of the surrounding marina, bay, and mountains. Suite one balcony All 113 rooms are adorned with modern fireplaces and large bathrooms. Floor-to-ceiling windows, a foyer, balcony, or terrace invite one to enjoy breathtaking landscapes and interiors inspired by the corresponding views and rich heritage of the region. The One&Only’s Suite One is a one-bedroom presidential suite providing the ultimate luxury escape with an outdoor dining area that can seat 12 and a separate private entrance. Chenot escape pool Additionally, the resort offers two private villas. Each of the secluded villas is in a garden with an outdoor shower, private pool, hydrotherapy pool with six massage stations, sunset views, and ample services from butlers, chefs, and valets to elevate your experience even further. The resort combines exquisite culinary experiences with a first-of-its-kind wellness concept at Chenot Escape. This is the pinnacle of spa-centered and holistic wellness, blending Chinese medicine and Western technology. Other luxury experiences include sailing a yacht along the Adriatic coastline, exploring the medieval towns of Perast and Kotor and the islands of Our Lady of the Rocks, along with sailing and diving classes. One&Only Portonovi also serves up cuisines from around the world, with some of the finest restaurants found on its grounds. Try Sabia by Giorgio Locatelli, the Michelin-star chef’s first restaurant, where he serves Riviera-style southern Italian cuisine. From €835 per night. Vinesse bar Oberoi Beach Resort Al Zorah, UAE Located in the UAE’s pristine Ajman emirate, The Oberoi Beach Resort Al Zorah offers a mind-easing experience away from Dubai’s hustle and bustle. The resort hotel features a sophisticated contemporary design by Italian architect Piero Lissoni, one million square meters of lush mangroves that come with pristine white sand beaches, lagoons that nurture biodiversity with almost 60 species of birds, a fish nursery, and offshore coral. There is also an 18-hole championship golf course designed by Jack Nicklaus, an array of water activities such as kayaking, paddle boarding, and wakeboarding, and a full menu of services offered at the Oberoi Spa, such as hammam scrubs, facials, sensorial treatments, and aromatherapy. Additionally, the resort offers adventurous excursions, included helicopter flights over Dubai and a pearl diving journey in Ras Al Khaimah. The lobby at Oberoi Beach Resort Al Zorah “The Oberoi Beach Resort Al Zorah is truly a hidden gem and offers a secluded getaway amid nature and perfect white sand natural beach,” says Antonino Cardillo, the hotel’s general manager. “Our luxury resort features modern Italian design unique to the region and offers legendary heartfelt Oberoi service, which is intuitive and always delivered with a smile.” Each of the rooms at the Oberoi resort features a Scandi-style design; walls are set with monochrome patchwork tiles and earth-toned minimalist furniture are matched with wool rugs. Every room has a private balcony with panoramic views and sunset vistas, alongside views of mangrove forests or gardens. The rooms are furnished to ensure utmost comfort with oversized sofas, king-sized beds, and handpicked modern artworks. For larger groups, the resort offers comfortable villas, which are adorned with modern technologies like Bose music wave systems and Apple TV, a private pool and garden, an extensive living and dining area, and the option to treat yourself to a bespoke barbecue experience within the comfort of your villa. Since the onset of the pandemic, the number of guests have been reduced, to ensure the safety of all. The Kohinoor suite bathroom The luxury retreat offers a taste-quenching gastronomical experience, serving up dishes from all around the world. The restaurants range from a fresh seafood relaxed dining experience at Aquario and an all-day dining experience serving up international dishes at Vinesse. The latter features a sophisticated glass design that makes it appear to float on the surrounding waters. There is also an alfresco dining space offering healthy and light tapas, artisanal breads, and sandwiches at the poolside lounge. If you’re looking for an intimate dining experience, the hotel offers dinner at a private beach cabana, designed by the chef to meet your needs. From AED1 700 per night. Read Next: Originally published in the May 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia The post.

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Can Drinking Liquid Chlorophyll Clear Up Acne Like the TikTok Trend Claims?

Courtesy of @ellietaylor929 @snaillyyyyy @madiwebb Like so many, I was bored in my childhood bedroom when I downloaded TikTok at the peak of the pandemic’s stay-at-home orders. I soon became obsessed with the creative platform’s sense of comfort and relatability through short-form video content. In no time, I found myself late-night scrolling through “SkinTok” and makeup tutorials, watching creators like give new meaning to “a full face of foundation.” Most recently, though, my curated beauty feed has been filled with liquid chlorophyll, a concentrated form of the naturally derived substance that gives plants their green pigment and is also found in green vegetables, like spinach and parsley. TikTokers’ have been dropping the dark-green liquid into their water like. The first jaw-dropping video I watched was made by user on her forehead, nose, and cheeks. In less than a minute’s time, Taylor documents her week of drinking a “dessert spoon-size” of liquid chlorophyll, which she adds to her water every day. Over three million viewers have watched Taylor’s viral video and have seen the drastic difference in her skin’s texture and redness. One week of drinking chlorophyll for my spots It’s no wonder that concentrated chlorophyll is flying off the shelves at the Vitamin Shoppe near me, where the sales associate said that in the last month they’ve seen a surge in liquid chlorophyll purchases. “The recent spike in interest in liquid chlorophyll has been extraordinary, driving a 500 percent increase in sales of the product at the Vitamin Shoppe in one week,” Muriel Gonzalez, executive vice president and chief merchandising and marketing officer at the chain, tells Allure. “On VitaminShoppe.com, liquid chlorophyll was the number-one search term of the week. This trend drove a wave of new customers to the Vitamin Shoppe and we sold out of the product in many places.” Before I could even start doing research, my phone was flooded with messages from friends and family who were also seeing this chlorophyll water trend on their feeds. Could adding a little concentrated chlorophyll to water be their remedy when it comes to acne,, and redness? “Taking it back to high school,” says, a board-certified dermatologist based in New York City, “chlorophyll is an important mediator in photosynthesis, which is the process by which plants convert sunlight energy to chemical energy.” Chlorophyll water is the new wave As far as its potential skin-care benefits, board-certified dermatologist and it has antioxidant properties,” says Patel, who is based in Germantown, Tennessee. This means it helps fight free radicals that occur when the skin is damaged or breaking down. “Liquid chlorophyll is helpful if you have inflammatory acne that is red and inflamed,” says Patel. Although, if you have deep, cystic acne, Patel does not suggest this antioxidant as “it may not be very helpful.” chlorophyll is the $hit According to cosmetic chemist Ginger King, liquid chlorophyll is a more concentrated form of what we get from eating dark, leafy greens. To put it into perspective, may sound outrageous, let’s not forget that after a few minutes on the stove spinach cooks down to almost nothing. With that in mind, eating 10 cups of spinach in one day doesn’t seem impossible, but adding 10 to 16 drops of liquid chlorophyll to water would be a great substitute for those times when I’m not feeling like Popeye. Although the trend seems to be drinking chlorophyll, it can also be used topically, which has its own benefits. “When using [chlorophyll] topically, there are two advantages: its antimicrobial ability, which can reduce swelling, and the green color, which can mask the redness from acne-prone skin, neutralizing its appearance,” King explains. Both Patel and Bhanusali agree that when used topically, this form of chlorophyll is not as stable and can be less effective. “There are many variables when using it topically, including the breakdown of the ingredient and oxidization,” says Patel. “Taking it orally is a better mode of taking it.” That may explain the results shown in these TikTok videos, like‘s below. Reply to @ggabbyy20 “There are small trials that show benefits in treating acne,” says Bhanusali about the trending green drink. “While research is very limited, it is certainly promising.” So, is drinking liquid chlorophyll the solution to help clear your acne-prone skin? If you’re already eating (or juicing) your greens, there is no need to supplement your diet with this concentrated form of antioxidant. But it definitely couldn’t hurt. Read Next: This TikTok Concealer Trick is a Game Changer for a Fresher, More Lifted Look Originally published on The post.

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Selena Gomez Launches Mental Health Initiative to Empower the Youth with Helpful Resources

Photo: Instagram/@selenagomez On Thursday, Selena Gomez launched a new campaign named Mental Health 101 theough her brand. Launched ahead of May, which is Mental Health Awareness Month, the campaign is aimed at raising awareness around the subject in educational settings. Emphasizing that mental health education is just as important as any other subject being taught, Gomez took to Instagram to share her own struggles and the importance of such conversations. “Today, I’m so grateful that we get to launch Mental Health 101. This campaign is so close to my heart because of my own struggles with mental health,” she wrote. “I know firsthand how scary and lonely it can feel to face anxiety and depression by yourself at a young age,” Gomez continued. “If I had learned about my mental health earlier on- been taught about my condition in school the way I was taught about other subjects- my journey could have looked very different. The world needs to know that mental health matters. It’s just as important as your physical health, and I wish we could all acknowledge that, not just in words but through our actions.” The 28-year-old went on to share a message of hope with those suffering from mental health issues and encouraged asking for help. “For anyone who is hurting right now, I hope you know that you are not alone,” she said. “I’m a believer in seeking help. Getting support and educating myself on mental health has changed my life, and it can change yours, too. I hope that Mental Health 101 will be the stepping stones for others that I wish I had… to get connected to the resources they need, and to empower young people in ways that may not have been possible before. I hope you’ll join me in supporting this initiative and being part of the change:. With gratitude, Selena.” In a second Instagram post, the actor and singer detailed how one can help support this campaign in three ways. Firstly, by signing Rare Beauty’s petition that is calling on the philanthropy community to support mental health services in schools,, and lastly, by sharing the post as well as tagging a friend. The post was captioned, “When I created Rare Impact by @RareBeauty, my goal was always to bring more mental health services to educational settings. I’m proud to launch #MentalHealth101- dedicated to supporting education and encouraging financial support for more mental health services in educational services.” In 2019, Gomez was awarded the Mclean Award for her mental health advocacy and later in April 2020, opened up about her bipolar diagnosis with Miley Cyrus on her Bright Minded Instagram live series. Gomez first launched the fundraiser for the on her 28th birthday last July. Rare Impact Fund was meant to raise $100 million over the next 10 years to provide mental health services to underserved communities, with 1% of annual sales will also be an extra addition alongside the funds raised. If Gomez were to reach her goal, the Rare Impact Fund would become one of the largest known funds supporting mental health from a corporate entity. Additionally, last year Rare Beauty also created the Rare Beauty Mental Health Council, which brings mental health experts from universities, organizations, and companies to navigate the company’s strategies in dealing with mental health. Some Rare Beauty, Mental Health Council members include The Cut Editor-in-Chief, Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Sephora Vice President of Merchandising, Makeup Jenifer Cohen, Youtube’s Global Social Impact Marketing Director Kit Hayes, and more. Read Next: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to Join Selena Gomez, J Lo, and More for Covid-19 Vaccine Benefit Concert The post.

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This New Skincare Range Will Save Sensitive Complexions

Tata Harper Superkind. Photo: Courtesy of Tata Harper Cult favorite skincare brand and soothing formulas. “I am thrilled to introduce our new collection, Superkind, to the Middle East [and] to the women in the Arab world who are such a highly engaged sector of the, but who in the past have been limited to basic formulas that don’t deliver powerful, multi-benefit results, she explains. Tata Harper. Photo: Courtesy of Tata Harper Designed to replenish the, the Superkind collection is free from a long list of skin triggers, including beta-hydroxy acids and sulfates. The allergy-safe formulas exclude essential oils, gluten, tree nuts, soy, or wheat. Approved by SkinSafe, a Mayo Clinic partner, the Superkind range is hypoallergenic, and suitable for those with sensitive or reactive skin types, as well as those healing from excessive acid and peel usage. Tata Harper Superkind Cleanser. Photo: Courtesy of Tata Harper Tata Harper says: “the Softening Cleanser comforts and conditions the skin while gently removing impurities. It’s powered by non-stripping, micro-foaming, botanical blends and our counter stress complex to nourish the skin with neutralizing antioxidants and strengthening minerals.” Tata Harper Superkind Moisturiser. Photo: Courtesy of Tata Harper “The Fortifying Moisturizer defends the skin against daily stress while targeting signs of aging. A multifunctional mulberry leaf complex targets dark spots, wrinkles, and sagging skin to restore a youthful complexion. The microalgae peptides shield the skin from stressors to prevent overreacting and rose of Jericho rejuvenates weak, damaged skin” Tata Harper Superkind Mask. Photo: Courtesy of Tata Harper “The Radiance Mask dissolves dullness without over-exfoliating the skin. It’s powered by self-neutralizing AHAs, balancing sugar prebiotics, and water-binding sugar carbohydrates that gently exfoliate, rebalance the microbiome, and rebuild the skin barrier to restore moisture, clarity, and radiance to stressed skin.” Read Next: The post.

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This Luxury E-Tailer is the One-Stop Shop for All Your Eid Gifts

Roman Stud Small Handbag 'AED 9,207'Buy Now Blossom Pink Intrecciato Raffia Stretch Mule Sandals 'AED 3,284'Buy Now Panthere Xl Blue Sapphire Yellow Gold Unisex Watch W25014b9 'AED 44,214'Buy Now Hermès Birkin 30 Bag Craie Gold Hardware Togo Leather 'AED 119,357'Buy Now The Pouch 'AED 11,752'Buy Now 18K Rose Gold Diamond Maya Earrings 'AED 36,083'Buy Now Black Hourglass Chain Bag 'AED 6,247'Buy Now Roman Stud Leather Pumps 'AED 3,563'Buy Now Roman Stud Small Handbag 'AED 9,207'Buy Now Blossom Pink Intrecciato Raffia Stretch Mule Sandals 'AED 3,284'Buy Now Panthere Xl Blue Sapphire Yellow Gold Unisex Watch W25014b9 'AED 44,214'Buy Now Hermès Birkin 30 Bag Craie Gold Hardware Togo Leather 'AED 119,357'Buy Now The Pouch 'AED 11,752'Buy Now 18K Rose Gold Diamond Maya Earrings 'AED 36,083'Buy Now Black Hourglass Chain Bag 'AED 6,247'Buy Now Roman Stud Leather Pumps 'AED 3,563'Buy NowAfter a sacred month dedicated to charity,. From the luxury statements of Bottega Veneta, Gucci, Balenciaga, and Valentino to the timeless pieces of Hermès and Chanel, the list goes on, making sure there is something for every preference. The edit also includes precious watches and jewels of Rolex, Cartier, Anita Ko, and Chantecler, for those with an appreciation of pieces that can be cherished forever. With a prevailing presence in more than 190 countries, The List ensures that no one is left uncherished, delivering luxury to doorsteps anywhere and anytime. Sourced from the most renowned boutiques from across the world, look no further than this list of gifts to be inspired this Eid and share something special with all of your loved ones. If you like to shop on the go, The List’s has added a drop model to the regular marketplace. This means you can now purchase highly demanded, limited, and hard-to-get globally sourced products without VIP status, waitlist, or queue at dynamic market prices. Read Next: Bvlgari’s Exclusive Collection Brings Italy to the Middle East in Celebration of Ramadan The post.

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Mrs Prada’s 12 Greatest Style Moments

Photo: Getty Mrs Prada celebrates her 72nd birthday on 10 May, and while the designer dresses legions of women worldwide in her unique brand of cerebral chic, this week we’re toasting Miuccia herself. Here, Vogue rewinds through 12 of her best outfits — from feather-trim trench coats to flatforms sandals and neon fringing — that hallmark her iconoclastic style. Photo: Getty 1. The shocking pink shirtwaister, June 2018 Miuccia stepped out in a fuchsia-pink shirtdress for the finale of Miu Miu’s 2019 Paris Cruise show in June 2018 — a blazing exclamation point on a collection dedicated equally to ankle-skimming gowns and abbreviated hot pants. Note the upper-arm bracelet worn atop the sleeve and signature sleek stilettos. Photo credit: REX/Shutterstock 2. The lime-green Met Gala look, May 2018  Miuccia wasn’t about episcopal tailoring or a gilded colour palette for 2018’s Met Gala, themed ‘Heavenly Bodies and the Catholic Imagination’. Instead, she wore neon green fringing — riffing off look 40 of Prada’s AW18 collection.  Photo credit: Getty Images 3. The scarlet skirt suit, March 2018 A very Miuccia entrance: scarlet Prada skirt suit (with the jacket wrapped, rather than fastened), black opaque tights and the trusty strappy silver sandals she would also wear to the Met Gala two months later. Photo credit: REX/Shutterstock 4. Jacquard co-ords, May 2017 Cannes Film Festival red carpet? No big deal. Mrs P attended the premiere of director Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Killing of a Sacred Deer in a Jacquard pantsuit that spotlighted the artisanal tee in place of a tailored jacket. Note the reappearance of the signature upper arm bangle, and the floral appliqué Miu Miu heels.  Photo credit: Getty Image 5. The smartest casuals, January 2017 If you ever need to take a moment to refresh how to wear chunky flats, look to Prada’s final bow at the house’s AW17 menswear show in Milan. The feather-trim pastel knee skirt, high neck blouse and grey cashmere V-neck are the holy trinity of polished daywear.  Photo credit: Getty Images 6. The marabou-trim trench, October 2016 Beyond executing the most elegant of bows, Miuccia’s marabou-trim trench coat and upscale hiking sandals are a lesson in finessing classic Prada style, which wasn’t lost on anyone stationed front row for Miu Miu’s SS17 catwalk show in Paris. Photo credit: Getty Image 7. The leather jacket and pleated skirt, March 2014 Mrs Prada was doing statement beige way back in 2014 with the leather bowling jacket. Her deft wardrobe assemblage gives a grounding in how to pull off the new-era cult shade — a flash of primrose yellow and unfussy late Nineties-style heels go a long way. Photo Credit: Getty Images 8. The prom skirt, October 2007 At the Hammer Museum’s Gala in the Garden back in 2007, Prada’s reimagined Fifties silhouette made the below-the-knee skirt the artistic focal point of an otherwise unshakably straightforward look. Photo credit: Getty Image 9. The headband, June 2004 Cast your mind back to the 2004 CFDA Fashion Awards in New York, when Mrs Prada demoed a dressed-up knit with lashings of costume jewellery — her crowning glory a regal headband, offset by an equally luminous smile.  Photo credit: Getty Images 10. The chandelier drop earrings, and sandals, 1996 Rewind to 1996: Backstage at a Miu Miu show in New York, the look is, of course, a perfect example of the era’s uptown style, but forget the fashion for now — this is one of those candid Nineties mood moments that Pinterest exists for. Photo credit: Getty Images 11. Snakeprint and purple hosiery, October 1996 Next up in 1996, the VH1 Fashion Awards in New York (where David Bowie performed Fashion in a McQueen Union Jack dress coat), with more Miuccia magic by way of red platforms, purple hosiery, a snakeskin jacket and another enormous smile.  Photo credit: Getty Images 12. The sheer pastel shift, 1993 An early Nineties Miu Miu flashback sees Miuccia wearing a sheer pastel shift, while demonstrating her now-signature love of black opaque tights. Naturally, the designer’s runway style coordinates with supermodels’ Kate Moss and Linda Evangelista, who are seen wearing similar but not the same looks. Read Next: Originally published on Vogue.fr The post.

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This is How Celebrities Keep Their Platinum Blonde Hair Looking Healthy

Billie Eilish. Photo: Instagram/@billieeilish Just in time for SS21, swapped her trademark black and yellow shag for a striking white-blonde shade, plus bangs. The singer showed off her new look on her Instagram, before dropping her new album cover featuring her platinum locks. Selena Gomez hit the salon too, emerging after eight hours and a reported 200 foils with a delicate pastel blonde hue by colorists Nikki Lee and Riawna Capri at Nine Zero One. “We’ve been doing Selena’s color for over a decade now. She typically keeps it pretty natural, but this time she went for a big change,” says Capri. “This blonde is unique to her as we had to make sure there was an equal balance of cool and warm for her skin tone. It’s an edgier look and perfect for summer.” Even for an undisclosed project. Blonde hair can be tough to maintain in the Middle East, with the harsh climate, air-conditioning, and all contributing to unwanted brassy blondes. Hicham Eid, creative director at Eideal and Davines Arabia, says that while getting blonde and bleached hair care right can be demanding, the pay-off is worth the effort. “You can still enjoy bleached blonde hair, but it will require adjusting your hair care and styling routine, most notably using the right products and taking the right steps to keep bleached blonde hair as healthy as possible,” shares Eid. The hair expert shares his top tips for keeping highlighted and bleached blondes looking bright and feeling healthy. Use a dedicated color-toning shampoo “It is hard to keep, but it’s also difficult to avoid brassiness. If you’re on major damage control, a purple shampoo isn’t a must, but if your blonde hair is on the healthier side and you’re looking to maintain the tone as much as possible, then consider adding a purple shampoo to the mix. I like Davines Alchemic Silver Shampoo and Conditioner. Be warned though: too much purple shampoo can actually change the color of your blonde if you use it too often or too soon after your color session, since the hair will be especially absorbent.” Davines Heart of Glass Sheer Glaze, eideal.com. Photo: Courtesy Alternate products during the week “I recommend alternating a hydrating shampoo and restorative conditioner like Davines NaturalTech Nourishing, with color protecting products designed specifically for blondes like the Davines Heart Of Glass range. Launched in March on eideal.com, the Heart of Glass range includes a silkening shampoo, a rich conditioner, an intense treatment with biacidic bond complex and baobab extract to strengthen the hair fiber to help prevent breakage, and the Sheer Glaze, which provides hydration, shine, and heat protection.” Add a treatment at the salon “Ask your colorist to use Olaplex during the color process. No. 1 and No. 2 are done in-salon and help rebuild and reverse damage and breakage as your hair. Then use Olaplex No. 3 as a home care treatment as it reduces breakage and visibly, improving its look and feel.” Slip Silk Pillowcase. Photo: Courtesy Update your amenities “ In the Gulf, water may be desalinated and can often negatively impact the hair and cause hair fall, especially if you have chemically treated or bleached hair. A shower filter will minimize this. Silk pillowcases are soft and smooth to the touch—this means that your hair glides easily over the pillowcase without any friction to rough up the strands.” Protect strands when styling “Always use a heat protector when using hot hair tools. I love the Davines OI All-In-One Milk. This multi-functional product hydrates, detangles, controls frizz and protects the hair from heat and offers all the benefits of a cream and the lightness of a spray.” Read Next: The post.

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Vaccinated Dubai Residents Can Now Access These Gyms for Free

Photo: Trunk On May 2, the Dubai Sports Council launched an initiative that gives anyone who has received the free training in gyms. The initiative titled Everyone Responsible for Everyone will last from May 3 to May 13 in cooperation with 55 fitness centers around Dubai. Some of the gyms participating in this initiative are Fitness First, Golds Gym, The Warehouse, Fitness 360, The Sevens, Just Play, and Zabeel Ladies Club. For anyone wishing to take part in this initiative, a Covid-19 vaccination certification approved by the Ministry of Health or the Dubai Health Authority must be shown upon arrival at any of the gyms. Fitness First has clarified that even if you are not a member of the gym, you can partake in this initiative at any of their branches as long as you provide them with proof of vaccination. The offer will still adhere to Covid-19 safety measures and protocol, ensuring that individuals within the gym are social distancing and operating at a certain capacity. Additionally, the Everyone Responsible for Everyone initiative is only valid for gym and facility access only; group classes are not included. The UAE has been urging all residents who are eligible to get the vaccine to do so to deter the likelihood of the virus mutating and developing. According to the, the UAE has administered at least 10,634,693 doses of vaccines so far, which means that over 54.4% of the population is vaccinated. During the last week, the UAE averaged 70,373 doses administered per day; if this rate continues, it will take another 28 days to administer enough doses for another 10% of the population. Read Next: The Sinopharm Vaccine Gets Renamed as UAE Launches its Own Production Line The post.

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12 Wardrobe Essentials For That Stylish Eid Staycation

Rave Review Hatty floral cotton terry-towelling hat at Matchesfashion.com 'AED 1,695'Buy Now Serpui raffia fringed bag at Farfetch.com 'AED 643'Buy Now Miu Miu Gingham Cotton Poplin Dress at Ounass 'AED 8,160'Buy Now Mango Croc effect heel sandals 'AED 169'Buy Now Dior White Cotton And Linen T-Shirt With ‘J’Adior 8’ Print 'AED 2,900'Buy Now Bottega Veneta Orange Leather Pouch at Level Shoes 'AED 10,150'Buy Now MGSM Pleated Floral-Print midi skirt at The Outnet 'AED 1,524'Buy Now Gucci Purple Square Sunglasses 'AED 1,330'Buy Now Dolce and Gabbana Crossed top in mixed with fruit and leopard print 'AED 3,982'Buy Now Amina Muaddi Lupita PVC Sandals at MyTheresa 'AED 2,110'Buy Now Burberry Short Sleeve Monogram Print Cotton Shirt 'AED 2,350'Buy Now Celine Strap Sandal in Metalized Calfskin 'AED 2,200'Buy Now Rave Review Hatty floral cotton terry-towelling hat at Matchesfashion.com 'AED 1,695'Buy Now Serpui raffia fringed bag at Farfetch.com 'AED 643'Buy Now Miu Miu Gingham Cotton Poplin Dress at Ounass 'AED 8,160'Buy Now Mango Croc effect heel sandals 'AED 169'Buy Now Dior White Cotton And Linen T-Shirt With ‘J’Adior 8’ Print 'AED 2,900'Buy Now Bottega Veneta Orange Leather Pouch at Level Shoes 'AED 10,150'Buy Now MGSM Pleated Floral-Print midi skirt at The Outnet 'AED 1,524'Buy Now Gucci Purple Square Sunglasses 'AED 1,330'Buy Now Dolce and Gabbana Crossed top in mixed with fruit and leopard print 'AED 3,982'Buy Now Amina Muaddi Lupita PVC Sandals at MyTheresa 'AED 2,110'Buy Now Burberry Short Sleeve Monogram Print Cotton Shirt 'AED 2,350'Buy Now Celine Strap Sandal in Metalized Calfskin 'AED 2,200'Buy NowWith just around the corner and summer finally in full swing, a long weekend makes the perfect time to enjoy a much-needed break in a wardrobe tailored to suit your off-duty mood. If your original summer travel plans are on hold, there are still that are primed for exploration and relaxation. The most successful way to convince yourself you are on a faraway vacation? Actively dress for the occasion. There is no shame in indulging in the perfect bucket hat or and Azza Slimane can attest to this in their playful wardrobe choices for the tropics. Coordinate outfits to suit your itinerary. Sunset drinks call for a chiffon midi skirt or tiered maxi dress, daytime lounging or a spot of sightseeing requires shade in the form of a raffia sun hat, and those special occasion dinners? Only a Dolce & Gabbana silk halter top will do. For a beach day don’t skip out on raffia shoppers big enough to fit books, SPF and lounging essentials. In fact, for any planned sandy days tap Mykonian beach vibes with accessories in natural fibers. Matching loungewear sets, such as those offered by, create an effortless yet composed ensemble when dressing up can feel too demanding. Yes, making a sartorial effort can feel too much when the point of a vacation is to switch off completely but subtle fashion choices can enhance your experience. While the distance you travel may be compromised for the time being, the environment you create for yourself doesn’t have to be. Read Next: 10 Pieces to Nail Joyful Dressing for Day This Summer The post.

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Iraqi Calligrapher Wissam Shawkat on Collaborating with Van Cleef & Arpels on a Special Ramadan Artwork

The Perlée collection. Photo: Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels With two collaborations, has taken an artistic route to convey the values of the Holy Month of Ramadan. This season, the French luxury jeweler has teamed up with French visual artist Arthur Hoffner and Iraqi calligraphy artist Wissam Shawkat on two artworks — each one emanating harmony. Wissam Shawkat photographed by Alin Constantin for VCA Calligraphy Commission 2021 Winner Coverage. Photo: Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels Championing local talent, Van Cleef & Arpels enlisted Iraqi calligraphy artist Wissam Shawkat to create a series of artworks inspired by the spherical beads of the Perlée collection. The artwork titled Pearls Radiant Harmony unifies three individual designs, with each of them embodying the ethos of Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr. “Ramadan, for me, means a time when people all come together and help each other. It purifies the heart and helps us enlighten from within. It’s a time to give more and get less,” says Shawkat. Vogue Arabia caught up with the artist to learn more about the collaboration and how the artwork came to be. How did the Perlée collection inspire the design? The artwork is inspired by the perfectly spherical beads of the Perlée collection, harmoniously coming together to create unity in an enchanting world. The Perlée collection has always been a symbol of joy and femininity, a celebration of delicate golden beads. I’ve strived to bring together the harmony of the season with the enchantment found in Van Cleef & Arpels’ creative universe, shedding light on the maison‘s values of unity and positivity. The design process took approximately two and a half months as we worked together to translate the harmony of the season through a collective vision. It has been an absolute pleasure to design this artwork, and I’m very happy with the outcome. I look forward to sharing this artwork with my family and friends in the art world during the Holy Month of Ramadan. Pearls Radiant Harmony by Wissam Shawkat. Photo: Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels You have created three designs and weaved them into one. What was your thought process behind this?  Using my unique calligraphy style, called the Al Wissam style, I unified the three designs to showcase harmony across the artworks. I have also used different stroke widths to create movement within the design. The stroke shapes and forms resemble the crescent and circular moon, a key symbol associated with Ramadan. The calligraphic style remains united and consistent with the rest of the campaign while giving this master artwork design its unique look and feel.  What are the words used in the designs, and what do they mean?  The artwork titled Pearls Radiant Harmony comes as a reflection of the spherical beads that form the Perlée collection and is showcased in an illustrative and magical way while conveying the beautiful message of the season: “Let harmony bring us together to enlighten our lives.” Each word becomes a sphere in harmony with the next word; the strokes of calligraphy completing each other and unifying harmoniously to create an enchanting scene. The main word meaning “bring us together” is the largest circle and holds the whole design together.  In your opinion, what is the significance of calligraphy? Calligraphy is the artistic identity of the region. It became very widespread because of its connections to Islam and the writing of the Qur’an, so this is how it grew. Since the 1960s calligraphy has been practiced as a contemporary art form, but now it is becoming even more popular due to the internet.   Photographed by Alin Constantin for VCA Calligraphy Commission 2021 Winner Coverage. Photo: Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels What do you love the most about this collaboration? There are a lot of common threads between my work and the values of the maison. Van Cleef & Arpels are artists in jewelry making, and I find my art so aligned with these efforts towards achieving excellence. The precision of the design, thought process, and craftsmanship are just a few things that align our values and ethos. Just as the maison enchants us with new designs based on patrimonial creations, similarly, I strive to introduce a contemporary touch to an ancient art form through my work as an Arabic calligraphist. I seek to push the boundaries of creativity, strive for excellence, persevere to achieve perfection in the strokes and techniques of my work – these traits are aligned with the maison‘s mastery of its craftsmanship. It has been an amazing experience to have this opportunity to express my creative potential while aligning with the maison‘s values and artistic style. This is the beginning of a long-term collaboration whose purpose is to give visibility to this art form as it will serve as an inspiration for the new generation of calligraphists. As an art form that is not only culturally relevant but also very important to the region, Van Cleef & Arpels aims to perpetrate Arabic calligraphy with a contemporary twist for emergent artists of the future, so that it is continued to be practiced and innovated in the years to come. Photographed by Alin Constantin for VCA Calligraphy Commission 2021 Winner Coverage. Photo: Courtesy of Van Cleef & Arpels  Read Next: Meet the Winner of the Van Cleef & Arpels Middle East Emergent Designer Prize 2020 The post.

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Your First Look at the ‘Divas, from Oum Kalthoum to Dalida’ Exhibition in Paris

The women of the Arab Golden Age are celebrated in an exhibition at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris. Shirin Neshat Ask My Heart, Looking For Oum Kulthum 2018 A familiar warmth, a voice that echoes, and eyes heavy with bliss. Such are the piercing remnants of the Arab Golden Age. There’s something to be said of an era that resonates beyond its years; a distant lullaby that once was, moving listeners, still. When pertaining to that of Arab history and lyricism, visiting the Parisian Institut du Monde Arabe is a must. For in the midst of this nostalgia lies Divas, from Oum Kalthoum to Dalida, unveiling this month. With this ode to a time and a devotion to its women, the institute opens passage to the most treasured artists of Arab music and cinema from the 1920s to 1970s. In narrating the nuances of an epoch, the lives and hearts of these women are assembled like never before. Among its most moving pieces are some personal belongings of Algerian singer Warda, Lebanese chanteuse Sabah’s extravagant gowns, and never-before-seen photographs from Egyptian-born French-Italian singer Dalida’s early days. These intimate items give way for a window into their value, and also includes rare interviews, classic movie ads, and excerpts. Through these, visitors are invited to reflect on their creative expressions, along with their influence within a discourse of emancipation. Fairuz’s 1960s record Fairuz at Ba’albak For what is a “diva?” To Hanna Boghanim and Élodie Bouffard – curators of the exhibition – their essence transcends that of mere performers to pioneering women, with “unparalleled gifts and exceptional charisma.” As they reflect, “The exhibition raises the question of their heritage, in contemporary, artistic creation. Along the way, Divas pays homage to powerful women who revolutionized artistic fields by establishing themselves in patriarchal societies.” From Cairo to Beirut and Algiers, these women advocated for the hopes of their people. Emerging from different faiths and origins, their unwavering legacies continue to charm. Oum Kalthoum was hailed as “the star of the east.” A queen of improvisation, her voice remains unmatched in power. As the Lebanese Fairuz later perpetuated Kalthoumian heritage – with a depth of her own – Warda renewed the style with sounds from the Maghreb. In the realms of film, one could hardly forget performers such as Samia Gamal or Taheyya Kariokka. Enduring in their eloquence, they were the first to popularize sharqî-style oriental dance. Egyptian singer Asmahan in Beirut, 1930s Following a period of optimism, which saw the Arab identity forged and anti-colonial struggles triumph, the influence of such women persists even today. Over the last 20 years, contemporary Arab art has evoked a feeling of nostalgia towards this golden age. As noted by the curators, “It is by listening to the popular heart, by following the gaze of contemporary artists and the musical avant garde, that we wanted to implement this great project.” Such reverence for the past is evident when observing contemporary works, such as Iranian artist Shirin Neshat’s 2017 film Looking for Oum Kulthum. The drama attests to her fascination with the icon, who established herself in a male-dominated society. Also reclaiming the iconography of the past, Youssef Nabil’s I Saved My Belly Dancer (2016) is a 12-minute-long video installation inspired by the 50s era of Egyptian cinema and starring Salma Hayek and Tahar Rahim. The work of the duo La Mirza and Waël Kodeih is also exemplary in this respect. The artists offer a musical installation based on extracts of Gamal and Kariokka, who come to life in the form of holograms. Algerian singer Warda in Algiers, 1970s These are women who continue to be recognized as the foundation of a shared Arab culture. Visionary and emancipated, their strengths and sensibilities are what elevate them still. As they linger within a collective cultural consciousness, the institute becomes a place to murmur their words and sway to their rhythms. To immerse oneself in their essence once more. Divas D’Oum Kalthoum à Dalida is on from May 12 to July 25 at Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris. Read Next: Originally published in the May 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia The post.

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Meghan Markle Wrote a Children’s Book—Here’s Everything We Know About The Bench

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex is presented with a book called Grandma Wombat by school children at South Melbourne Beach on October 18, 2018 in Melbourne, Australia. Photo: Getty Come June 8, you may see a familiar name at your local bookstore:. On May 4, she announced the release of her new children’s book, The Bench. Published by Random House and illustrated by Caldecott-winning artist Christian Robinson, The Bench tells the story of the bonds between fathers and sons, as described by their mothers. The concept came to the duchess on Father’s Day of 2018—Harry’s first as a dad, and an emotional milestone for any young family. Meghan decided to put her feelings from that day down on paper. “The Bench started as a poem I wrote for my husband on Father’s Day, the month after Archie was born,” the Duchess of Sussex says. “That poem became this story.” The cover of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex’s new children’s book. Illustrations are by award-winning artist Christian Robinson.Photo: Courtesy of Random House It was important for Meghan and Robinson that The Bench feature families from all walks of life. Illustrations shared from the book, for example, show a young boy overjoyed by the return of his military father. In another, a Black child naps peacefully on his father’s chest, clutching a stuffed giraffe. “This representation was particularly important to me, and Christian and I worked closely to depict this special bond through an inclusive lens,” the duchess says. That perspective is inevitably important to the many, many multicultural households across America. The children’s book industry has a noted lack of diversity: According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Cooperative Children’s Book Center, only in 2020 featured racially diverse characters. “My hope is that The Bench resonates with every family, no matter the makeup, as much as it does with mine,” Meghan says. A page from The Bench. Illustration by Christian Robinson, courtesy of Random House. It’s just the latest project for the duchess, who, since stepping down from the royal family in early 2020, has undertaken several creative projects. She and Harry inked high-profile deals with both Netflix and Spotify. Then in November, she wrote about suffering a miscarriage, and the subsequent grief that followed. Meghan and Prince Harry are expecting a second child, a daughter, Read Next: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Both Plan on “Proper Time Off” After Their Baby’s Birth Originally published on The post.

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How to Get Audrey Hepburn’s Classic Cat-Eye Flick

Photo: Getty Images When it comes to creating the ultimate feline flick, look no further than Hollywood legend Audrey Hepburn. “Her almond eyes were synonymous with the winged eyeliner that adorned them, and the perfectly defined lashes that fluttered as she gazed through the window of Tiffany & Co, eating a croissant,” says Vogue makeup artist,. “When Alberto de Rossi died, Hepburn’s makeup artist of 25 years, she was said to have declared she’d rather not work again. A perfect tribute to the enormous role that makeup — and the man applying it — had played in her career. Legend has it that de Rossi would apply mascara and then separate each individual eyelash with a safety pin to emphasise her doe eyes.” Indeed, famed for her feminine brows and signature cat-eye, Hepburn’s was a beauty that surpassed all others.  Below, Vogue makeup artist Celia Burton breaks down the steps to recreating Audrey Hepburn’s signature cat-eye flick. Photo: Getty Images Step 1: Use liquid eyeliner to mark the position Look straight into a mirror, with your chin lowered. Consider your eye shape, and use a liquid liner — my favourites are — to mark out with a dot or dash where you want the ‘flick’ to finish. For the Hepburn effect, I recommend a sharp, squat flick, angled upwards and outwards from the end of the lash line at 45 degrees. Step 2: Drag the eyeliner across the eye Tip your head back, so now you’re looking down at the mirror, and drag the liner across the eye from the inner corner, staying as close to the lash line as possible. Always have a cotton bud and oil-free makeup remover to hand, to neaten as you go.  Photo credit: Getty Images Step 3: Connect the dots and thicken up Stop when you reach the end of the lash line, return to looking straight into the mirror, and join the dots from the marked spot to the main event. You can leave this skinny, as a subtle flick, or thicken it out at the wing — just make sure to keep the 45-degree angle. If you prefer your liner soft or blurred, use a gel-liner pencil in the same way — my favourites are — and smudge it along the lash line with a brush or finger before it sets, then tidy up the bottom of the flick with a cotton bud and oil-free makeup remover.  Step 4: Finish with lashings of mascara  Finish with an intensely black, lengthening mascara such as, making sure not to clump the lashes in tribute to Alberto de Rossi and his safety pin… Read Next: Originally published on The post.

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How to Practice Pottery as a Therapeutic Process to Relax and Create

An ancient art revived for modern times, pottery offers a therapeutic process to relax and create. Ceramics by Laurence Leenaert Of Lrnce. Photo: Supplied An ancient craft that has lived through the ages as an artistic medium and practical necessity, pottery is now being rediscovered. Emerging in the Middle East around the 9th century as a result of trade with China and the heavy import of porcelain, the first fine pottery was produced in Baghdad and elsewhere in the caliphate, with prominent production centers sprouting up from Damascus to Tabriz. Ream Saksouk in her studio. Photo: Supplied “Pottery was one of the first inventions in human history,” says Ream Saksouk, owner of Dubai-based ceramic studio, meaning “handmade” in Arabic. “Before the Neolithic period, people invented ways to carry and conserve their food in vessels made from mud or clay.” Its uses have evolved dramatically in the current day. Established five years ago in the city’s Al Quoz district, Yadawei was one of the first pottery concept studios in the GCC, providing a purpose-built space for members and students exploring clay as a medium of art expression and design. This modern pottery is made of the same reddish brown clay that originated in ancient Egypt and that was used at the time to manufacture small lamps, children’s toys and ships, and pottery game boards with clay pieces. Today, “Participants can use the wheel, a machine that rotates to create a rounded vessel, or the hand-build technique where they can shape the clay with their hands to create plates, cups, or statues,” Saksouk explains. Luxury brands like René Caovilla are finding parallels between their sculptural designs and the age-old craft, inviting guests to enjoy pottery workshops in collaboration with the likes of Oka Ceramic Studio in Dubai. Ceramics by Laurence Leenaert Of Lrnce. Photo: Supplied Across the region, prominent potters and ceramicists are emerging with their own unique styles and take on the traditional craft. From Laurence Leenaert in Marrakech, whose whimsical creations and enigmatic forms have sparked global attention for her brand has been dabbling in pottery for several years, using it both as a creative outlet and a means to relax. She has found inspiration in global artists, including South African ceramicist Hylton Nel, whose work is funky, strange, and imperfect; Danish Maria Lenskjold, with her quirky and unbalanced pieces; and Swedish Joakim Ojanen, who creates ceramics that are whimsical, a bit scary, and colorful. “I started working with ceramics several years ago, but didn’t take it seriously,” Kassicieh says. “I would make plates, cups, and bowls as gifts for friends and family, and then I began taking classes to improve and learn more.” Lena Kassicieh’s work. Photo: Supplied The making of pottery or ceramics itself, the Dubai-based artist adds, is quite a time-consuming practice that requires many stages. “One ceramic piece can take weeks to finish, so it definitely tests your patience. It is also exciting as sometimes you’re not quite sure how the end result will look, as there are elements you cannot control,” she explains. “It’s taught me a lot about letting go a bit, and not expecting perfection. With digital art or collaging, I feel a lot more in control, but with ceramics, you have to let go of some of that.” Saksouk agrees that sculpting can be therapeutic, and can even help during stressful periods. “Nowadays pottery is becoming a relaxing activity, like… The more you blend and shape it, the more it relaxes you. And the final result gives you a high sense of self-esteem and pride.” It has been especially helpful during the Covid-19 pandemic, when many people across the world have been feeling stressed, lonely, and anxious. In the beginning, Saksouk says many of her members were frustrated about not being able to go into the studio. But as they had taken their clay and tools home, they continued to work. “I created a WhatsApp group with my members, which kept us in touch and helped us send pictures of our work the whole time,” she says. Piece by Ream Saksouk. Photo: Supplied For Kassicieh, the process has taught her to let go of perfectionism. “Especially now, when many of us have realized that control is an illusion, pottery is a great way to remind ourselves that we’re not really in control and we have to accept that and work with it. There’s also something wonderful about making artworks that have a function and purpose (like a bowl, plate, cup, vase) that can be decorative but also useful,” she says. “I’ve enjoyed putting energy into that, and then gifting items to friends and family. Seeing the pottery in their homes makes me happy, like a piece of me lives with them everyday.” Read Next: How Caring for Green Things Can Lower Your Anxiety Originally published in the April 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia The post.

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How to Do Your Own Henna This Eid, as Taught by Azra Khamissa

Azra Khamissa photographed by Abdulla Elmaz for Vogue Arabia The practice of however, takes on a more contemporary approach to the ritual. Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Courtesy of Azra Khamissa Her unique and modern designs were quick to take Instagram by storm within a span of only two years and even lead to the launch of her very own henna brand named Azra. The product under her namesake brand features no ordinary henna formula as Khamissa claims it is non-toxic and “pure natural goodness.” “Made with care and dedication, by hands, for your hands,” wrote Khamissa announcing the product. “After two years of trial and error, giving up, and then trying again, we have a beautifully branded henna cone! Just in time for Eid.” Explaining more about the formula she added: “The color, is deep and dark; the smell, just perfect; the size, making it nice and easy to use. No toxicity, no-nonsense, just pure natural goodness.” 00:00 / 00:00 Video View CountDo not alter this value. Validate Email “My henna designs are a complete contrast to what people in the Middle East are used to,” she previously shared with Vogue.me. “Henna is something I am very passionate about; it makes me feel alive and allows me to express my artistic side. The best thing about it is that unlike a tattoo, I can update the designs regularly and natural henna is actually good for your skin.” Her minimalistic designs feature intricate sketches and trend-driven patterns, serving perfect inspiration for body-art this Eid. Her mini-tutorial on the stunning body-art teaches the essential henna basics you should follow if you’re planning on henna painting this holiday. Read Next: How Practicing Henna Can Help Relieve Stress The post.

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Damas’s Fireworks Collection Will Have You Lighting Up the Sky

Damas’s Fireworks collection. Photographed by Amina Zaher for Vogue Arabia Damas, the iconic jewelry house, is taking creative gemology to the next level through a collaboration with an award-winning designer. And it is nothing short of spectacular. Bursting with vibrant colors and bold demeanor, Damas’s new collaboration with designer celebrates life with all of its exhilarating twists and turns. The awe-inspiring Fireworks collection features three jewelry lines bedazzled with diamonds and precious and semi-precious stones that unite in a captivating display. Damas’s Fireworks collection. Photographed by Amina Zaher for Vogue Arabia Inspired by the grandeur of fireworks, an icon of celebration, this new collection radiates with extraordinary colors and serendipitous composition. The unique collection is crafted using intricate design innovation, allowing for statement pieces to be worn and styled in a number of ways. Engulfed with versatility, the collection serves as a bold expression of every woman’s style and personality as they celebrate their own journey in life. Damas’s Fireworks collection. Photographed by Amina Zaher for Vogue Arabia In addition to intricately designed necklaces, bracelets, rings, and earrings, the Fireworks collection makes a show-stopping statement with bold ear cuffs, palm cuffs, nail cuffs, chokers, and midi rings. Shimmering with striking variety, each alluring assortment of gemstones is carefully curated to exhibit strength and confidence, all while unveiling an undeniable passion for life. Damas’s Fireworks collection. Photographed by Amina Zaher for Vogue Arabia For more than 100 years, Damas has used its creativity, innovation, and expertise to tell stories of beauty. Today, alongside Vinita Michael, the brand has encapsulated the pinnacle of celebration in its craft, cherishing none other than the beauty of life itself. Read Next: Bvlgari’s Exclusive Collection Brings Italy to the Middle East in Celebration of Ramadan Videography: Karim Atassi
Photography: Amina Zaher 
Style: Rashwan
Styling assistant: Ema Manikaite
Hair: Deena Alawaid 
Makeup: Kasia Domanska 
Model: Marli Libucha
Production: Camilla Fitz-Patrick 
Production assistant: Cynthia Baaklini 
Mirrors provided by The One The post.

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10 Pieces to Nail Joyful Dressing for Day This Summer

STELLA MCCARTNEY 'AED 4,959.79'Buy Now JACQUES MARIE MAGE 'AED 2,479'Buy Now ALEXANDER MCQUEEN 'AED 14,885'Buy Now JW ANDERSON 'AED 4,895'Buy Now HOPEFUL 'AED 764'Buy Now GIVENCHY 'AED 1,750'Buy Now AMINA MUADDI 'AED 4,590'Buy Now ISABEL MARANT 'AED 2,243'Buy Now RAEY 'AED 1,403'Buy Now MARA PARIS 'AED 2,185'Buy Now STELLA MCCARTNEY 'AED 4,959.79'Buy Now JACQUES MARIE MAGE 'AED 2,479'Buy Now ALEXANDER MCQUEEN 'AED 14,885'Buy Now JW ANDERSON 'AED 4,895'Buy Now HOPEFUL 'AED 764'Buy Now GIVENCHY 'AED 1,750'Buy Now AMINA MUADDI 'AED 4,590'Buy Now ISABEL MARANT 'AED 2,243'Buy Now RAEY 'AED 1,403'Buy Now MARA PARIS 'AED 2,185'Buy NowAs the mercury rises, it’s time to retire minimalist tonal tailoring for something a little more joyful. This means unexpected shapes,, everything goes, from metallic gold shoppers to neon green sunglasses and studded pumps. Shop from our edit above to nail joyful dressing this season. Read Next: 10 White Sneakers to Up Your Shoe Game with Ease This Summer The post.

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5 Things To Know About Chanel’s Cocteau-Inspired Cruise Show

Courtesy of Chanel Virginie Viard took’s Cruise 2021/22 collection to the South of France, where she staged a dreamy presentation complete with nods to Jean Cocteau and a live performance from the French singer Sébastian Tellier. Vogue brings you five things to know about the collection. Courtesy of Chanel The show took place in Carrières de Lumières “An invitation to travel” was how Chanel described its Cruise 2021/22 show, set in the Carrières de Lumières in the village of Les Baux-de-Provence. A former quarry, the place is now home to epic lightshows that draw crowds when there’s not a pandemic around. In 1959, Jean Cocteau shot his film The Testament of Orpheus there, casting a stellar group of fellow artists from Pablo Picasso to Brigitte Bardot. Virginie Viard is a fan: “In particular this magnificent scene: a man with a black horse’s head descends into the Carrières de Lumières, his silhouette cut out against the very white walls,” she said. Cocteau, of course, was also friends with Gabrielle Chanel, or “my dear Coco” as he called her in his letters. Their two worlds united in Viard’s collection, underpinned by the house’s eagerness to return to the life of travel that created Cruise collections in the first place. Courtesy of Chanel It was summertime modernism Backdropped by the golden white limestone of the Carrières de Lumières, Viard rolled out a modernist collection rooted in the familiarities of summertime travel. “The simplicity, the precision and the poetry of Cocteau’s film made me want to create a very clean collection, with a very distinct two-tone, made up of bright white and deep black,” she said. Graphic black and white dresses had a naval sensibility about them, which, when backed up by knitted macramé dresses and capes, were decidedly seaside-friendly. Add magnified peplos silhouettes and those pre-pandemic memories of the Mediterranean were hard to forget. It was perhaps Viard’s most comfort-driven collection since taking the reins at Chanel, a statement expressed in knitted tracksuits, mesh tops layered casually over t-shirts, and twill dungarees with frayed edging. Courtesy of Chanel There were frills and fringes galore Adding to the lightness of it all, Viard trimmed her garments and bags with frills and fringes that brought a continuous sense of movement to the collection. “Echoing the extreme modernity of Cocteau’s film, I wanted something quite rock,” she said. “Lots of fringes, in leather, beads and sequins, T-shirts bearing the face of the model Lola Nicon like a rock star, worn with tweed suits trimmed with wide braids, and pointed silver Mary-Janes. A look that recalls as much the modernity of the sixties as that of punk…” Courtesy of Chanel It got animalistic Gabrielle Chanel shared with Jean Cocteau an affinity for bestiaries, observed in the various animal representations that embellished her apartment at 31 rue Cambon. Viard translated the fascination into various motifs in prints and “lucky charm” adornments, which easily captured the free-spiritedness of the collection. They included stars, a nod to an “absinthe star” Chanel mentioned in one of her letters to Cocteau. After the show, each model released a white dove before the French singer Sébastian Tellier performed a low-key medley that could have scored a summer night’s dinner in the South of France. Courtesy of Chanel Chanel continued to evolve its digital format Since the pandemic put a stop to live audiences and travel, Chanel has steadily been developing its digital experiences to make them more immersive for viewers and clients – while making no secret of the fact that it intends to return to the live format as soon as possible. This season came with a preview short film by Inez and Vinoodh shot at 31 rue Cambon, as well as moodboards depicting the friendship between the house’s founder and Jean Cocteau. Read Next: How Virginie Viard is Reimagining Chanel for the House’s Next Chapter Originally published on The post.

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The 5 Most Hotly Anticipated Shows and Movies Releasing on Netflix This Summer

Halston. Photo: Netflix As we approach the summer of 2021, with countless cinemas across the world still shuttered and the future uncertain, featuring Amy Adams and Julianne Moore, a miniseries chronicling the life of a fashion icon, and the return of two binge-worthy shows that proved to be essential quarantine viewing the first time around. These are the five releases to add to your watch list now. 1. The Woman in the Window (out May 14) Woman in the Window (2021). Photo: Melinda Sue Gordon/ Netflix A distressed Amy Adams plays an agoraphobic child psychologist who watches her neighbours through the windows of her New York brownstone in Joe Wright’s twisty. She makes a new friend (Julianne Moore), but then witnesses her being attacked, after which her cloistered existence unravels entirely. The supporting cast is stellar (Gary Oldman, Anthony Mackie, Brian Tyree Henry and Jennifer Jason Leigh) and the powerful sense of claustrophobia undeniably timely. 2. Halston (out May 14) Halston (2021). Photo: Atasushi Nishijuma/Netflix Created by Sharr White, directed by Daniel Minahan and executive produced by, this glittering five-part drama casts Ewan McGregor as the titular designer who changed the face of American fashion. As we track his stratospheric rise and eventual downfall, as a result of addiction and ill-advised business decisions, expect flamboyant 1970s costumes, wild nights at Studio 54 and an introduction to his circle, which included actor Liza Minnelli and jewelry designer Elsa Peretti. 3. Army of the Dead (out May 21) Army of the Dead (2021). Photo: Clay Enos/ Netflix What happens when a group of mercenaries are hired to retrieve US $200m from a Las Vegas casino during a zombie outbreak? Prepare to find out in’s delightfully bombastic action epic which centres on Dave Bautista as a war hero who assembles an eclectic crew (Ella Purnell, Omari Hardwick, Ana de la Reguera, Tig Notaro and Matthias Schweighöfer). It has all the ingredients of a summer blockbuster: shoot-outs, spectacular set pieces and laughs, not to mention a zombie tiger. 4. Never Have I Ever (expected July 2021) Never Have I Ever (2021) . Photo: Isabella B. Vosmikova/ Netflix As charming as it was quietly revolutionary, the first season of and Lang Fisher’s high-school comedy about Indian-American teenager Devi won hearts the world over. Now, its magnetic lead, Maitreyi Ramakrishnan, is back for the second instalment with a slew of new additions, from Megan Suri as a fellow student to Common as a potential love interest for Devi’s mother (Poorna Jagannathan). It’ll be worth watching for the side-splitting one-liners and shattered stereotypes. 5. Lupin (expected summer 2021) Lupin (2020). Photo: Emmanuel Guimier. If you’re still reeling from the cliffhanger ending of the first part of George Kay’s ingenious thriller, take solace in the fact that the second half is on its way. It’ll follow the charismatic Omar Sy in the role of Assane, a thief hellbent on avenging his father’s death whose son (Etan Simon) has just been abducted by his enemies. There are sure to be more shocking revelations, tense standoffs, elaborate disguises and the same sleight of hand that made the earliest episodes so irresistible. Read Next: A Netflix Film on Syrian Refugees-Turned-Olympians Yusra and Sarah Mardini is in the Works Originally published on The post.

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